Archive for the Category »Sailing Boats «

Navy laser championship to begin from April 15

: The inaugural edition of the Navy Open Laser Championship, a national-level open sailing event, will be held at the Ettikulum Bay of the Indian Naval Academy (INA) at Ezhimala here from April 15 to 18.

Teams from various sailing clubs affiliated to the Yachting Association of India (YAI) will participate in the event, the INA said in a press release here on Monday. The participants will compete in sailing Laser-Standard and Laser-Radial class of sail boats for a cumulative prize money of over half-a-lakh rupees.

The championship being organised under the aegis of the Indian Naval Sailing Association (INSA) will have separate races being conducted for both Laser Standard and Laser Radial sail boats with nine races spread over three days. Individual medals and prize money will be awarded to top three positions in Laser Standard for men’s category and Laser Radial (open-combined men and women).

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Get, set, sail from Sir Bani Yas Island!

Sailors from across the UAE gear up for 2-day race to Dubai Offshore Sailing Club

Sailors from across the UAE will once compete with each other in the second annual Sir Bani Yas Offshore Race.

Just as last year, the two-day race covering 175 nautical miles from Sir Bani Yas island in the far Western waters of Abu Dhabi to Dubai is organised by Abu Dhabi’s Tourism Development and Investment Company (TDIC) in partnership with Dubai Offshore Sailing Club (DOSC).

Last April some 80 sailors in 11 sailing boats lined up at the start line and this year TDIC expects more participants.

“This year, we’ve opened up participation to sailing clubs throughout the UAE. The events’ recurrence shows that Sir Bani Yas is a viable location for such sporting events, and a destination that is capable of welcoming boating travellers to the island,” said Ahmed Al Fahim, executive director of marketing, communications, sales and leasing at TDIC.

Ahead of the race, sailors will travel to Sir Bani Yas island, where they will berth and prepare for the main race. Some are already on their way, planning some island hopping before reaching one of Abu Dhabi’s most treasured islands.

An 87-square kilometre island, Sir Bani Yas has a rich history as a destination for sailors to trade or replenish their supplies. An island inhabited for 7,500 years, it was developed into a wildlife reserve by the late Shaikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, who started a programme of rehabilitation of the Arabian Oryx — an indigenous species extinct in the wild — on the island in the 1970s.

Shaikh Zayed found two Arabian Oryx in a US zoo, which he brought to Sir Bani Yas island, and today there are thousands of them roaming freely on the island.

As a result of dedicated environmental and conservation efforts, over 10,000 animals and birds, including gazelles, ostriches, giraffes and cheetahs, can be found in the 4,100 hectare Arabian Wildlife Park — a popular attraction on the island.

Events such as the sailing race are meant to create more awareness about Sir Bani Yas’ environmental efforts and its tourism attractions.

Setting out from Sir Bani Yas Island, the sailors will be taking on one of the oldest trading routes in the region, before crossing the finishing line at DOSC.

“Not only have several of last year’s participants signed up once again, we’ve also received interest from new sailors. Given the growing interest for the event, we believe it has a bright future as one of the most looked forward to sailing events in the UAE,” said James Harris, sailing manager at DOSC.

 

Copyright © 2015 Khaleej Times. All Rights Reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).


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Sailing federation rejects complaint vs America's Cup jury

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Sailing’s international governing body has rejected a former official’s complaints of gross misconduct filed against the America’s Cup jury that handed down the harshest penalty in the history of sailing’s marquee regatta.

In a statement posted on its web site on Monday, the International Sailing Federation says that along with outside attorneys, it reviewed the complaints by Paul Henderson of Toronto and “considers there is no case to answer.” Henderson has the right to appeal, ISAF said.

ISAF has refused to divulge which of its officials reviewed the complaints.

Henderson is a former ISAF president and a former member of the International Olympic Committee.

He filed complaints in January contending the five-member jury failed to provide a fair hearing to sailors from Oracle Team USA while investigating the biggest cheating scandal in America’s Cup history.

Messages were left seeking comment from Henderson.

Henderson filed his complaints a few weeks after the Court of Arbitration for Sport reduced sailor Dirk de Ridder’s suspension from sanctioned events from three years to 18 months. De Ridder was banned from the 34th America’s Cup in September 2013 and Oracle Team USA was docked two points in a scandal involving manipulation of the weight distribution of boats that Oracle sailed in warmup regattas.

Henderson filed individual complaints against jury members Bryan Willis of Britain and Graham McKenzie of New Zealand, based on depositions they gave during hearings before CAS, and a single complaint against the other three jury members, David Tillett of Australia, Josje Hofland of the Netherlands and John Doerr of Britain.

Four days before the first race between Oracle Team USA and Emirates Team New Zealand in the 34th America’s Cup, de Ridder, a key crew member, was banned from the regatta and the American-based crew was docked two points. Two shore crew members also were expelled, grinder Matt Mitchell was barred from the first four races and the syndicate was fined $250,000.

After falling behind 8-1, Oracle Team USA staged one of the greatest comebacks in sports and won the final eight races to retain the Auld Mug.

ISAF later suspended de Ridder from sanctioned events for five years, a penalty ultimately reduced to three years. De Ridder then appealed to CAS.

In a majority decision announced in December, CAS, finding fault with both de Ridder and ISAF, reduced the suspension to 18 months.

De Ridder has denied involvement in the scandal.

Mitchell also filed complaints of gross misconduct against the five jury members, alleging “a trail of conspiratorial ineptitude that is hard to refute.”

In a separate complaint, Mitchell asked ISAF to investigate former Oracle Team USA teammate Simeon Tienpont for breaking a racing rule and lying during a hearing. Mitchell says he was punished because Tienpont lied to the jury.

Mitchell’s complaint says Willis and McKenzie chose not to bring charges against Tienpont despite having a signed admission from the Dutch sailor, and that the jury failed to share with the accused sailors the notes of a meeting between Willis and McKenzie, and Oracle Team USA general manager Grant Simmer and attorney Lee Ann La France, hired by the syndicate to conduct an internal investigation.

___

Follow Bernie Wilson on Twitter at http://twitter.com/berniewilson


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Italian rescue services save thousands of migrants sailing from Libya

Italian rescue services saved 5,629 migrants and refugees sailing from Libya to Italy during the last few days, officials said Monday, as aid agencies predicted a large wave of migration across the Mediterranean this summer.

The migrants, including Africans fleeing extremism, poverty and oppression, and Syrians escaping their country’s grueling civil war, were packed into 20 rickety fishing boats and overloaded inflatable dinghies, officials said.

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After leaving Libya, the migrants used satellite phones to send out distress calls and were picked up by Italian coast guard vessels, merchant ships and patrol ships sailing as part of a European Union mission.

Nine of the migrants drowned when their vessel capsized, while 144 other passengers from the vessel were pulled out of the water after they were spotted by a coast guard surveillance plane. Officials said the 5,629 people were saved in a three-day period that started Friday.

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The migrants set sail as calm weather arrived in the Mediterranean, and officials predicted numbers sailing this year could rise above the 170,000 who sailed to Italy in 2014. Thousands are waiting to leave from Libya, where militias are fighting for power.

“Talking to people arriving, you hear stories about children armed with guns in Libya and amazing violence,” said Giovanna di Benedetto, a spokeswoman with Save the Children. “I predict big numbers this year and we need to strengthen the rescue operation at sea.”

At least 9 killed in attack on Libyan hotel, including one American

At least 9 killed in attack on Libyan hotel, including one American associated press Gunmen stormed a luxury hotel in the Libyan capital of Tripoli on Tuesday, killing four foreigners and five guards, and triggered an hours-long standoff that ended when two assailants set off a grenade that killed them, officials said. Gunmen stormed a luxury hotel in the Libyan capital of Tripoli on Tuesday, killing four foreigners and five guards, and triggered an hours-long standoff that ended when two assailants set off a grenade that killed them, officials said. ( associated press ) –>

The Italian coast guard has made most of the sea rescues this year after the cancellation of an Italian navy operation, Mare Nostrum, last year, which was replaced by the more limited EU operation Triton, which stays closer to the Italian coast.

European governments suggested at the time that Mare Nostrum was encouraging migrants to sail. But with 18,000 sailing so far this year, numbers are about the same as last year. What has increased is the number drowning — about 500 so far this year, compared with about 17 in the same time last year, the United Nations said.

“The end of Mare Nostrum has not deterred anyone and more are dying because the navy is not patrolling the high seas,” said Carlotta Sami, a United Nations spokeswoman.

On Monday, aid officials were rushing to Palermo, where up to 1,200 migrants were expected to land during the night, including 13 pregnant women and 55 minors.

“The minors coming in are from Gambia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and Ivory Coast,” said a spokesman for Save the Children. “This is a problem because centers for unaccompanied minors in Palermo are already full.”

On Friday, the international aid agency Doctors Without Borders said it would team with an American, Christopher Catrambrone and his Italian wife, Regina, to mount a 3.2 million euro [about $3.4 million] private rescue effort for migrants between May and October.

The Catambrones, who run a medical insurance business on the island of Malta, spent 800,000 euros [about $850,000] last year to buy a ship and helicopter drones and picked up 3,000 migrants at sea over a six-week period during the summer.

This year they will extend the operation to six months, running between May and October, joined by Doctors Without Borders, which will split the costs with the couple. The aid agency will provide a medical team of two doctors and a nurse to treat dehydration, fuel burns, severe sunburn and hypothermia suffered at sea by migrants.

Kington is a special correspondent.

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times


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Young sailors take part in Commodores' Cup Regatta

MANILA, Philippines – Sixteen young sailors aged 9-15 participated in the dinghies competition (optimist class) during the recently concluded 8th Commodore’s Cup Regatta in Subic Bay Freeport Zone.

The young sailors, mostly from Cavite and Paranaque City, were trained in Manila for three months by Philippine Sailing Association coach Medy Fidel.

This summer, the training program will be expanded in Subic Bay wherein prospective sailors will come from Olongapo City and nearby towns of Zambales.

Hong Kong’s Frank Pong, Asia’s top sailor and Asian Yachting Grand Prix Skipper of the Year, is among the leading supporters of sailing in the Philippines.

He recently donated new sails for the training boats of the Saturday Afternoon Gentlemen Sailing Club to help jump start the sailing program in Subic.


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America's Cup to have six or seven boats

The 2017 America’s Cup will feature six or seven yachts despite fallout over a change in boat size, according to race director Russell Coutts.

A probable new Asian entry will be announced next month, Coutts told AFP.

For the next contest in Bermuda, boats will be shrunk from 62 feet (19 metres) to 45-50 feet (13.7- 15.2 metres) as a cost-saving measure.

Four of the six teams who voted in favour of reducing the boat size last week issued a statement criticising Team New Zealand for their opposition.

Italian syndicate Luna Rossa, who were also opposed to the reduction in boat size, have withdrawn from the 2017 Cup in protest at what it called the “illegitimate” decision.

But organisers insist they were right.

“Since the launch of the AC45 turbos (with foils), people have realised that these boats, much smaller than the AC72, are fast and good for TV,” insisted Coutts, chief executive of the America’s Cup Event Authority.

“The boats will not be slower than the AC72 because their teams will have more expertise and there is a good chance that the 50-knot barrier will be broken.

“With the AC48, budgets are less important. To be a decent player, if you’re starting today, you need around 20 to 30 million US dollars,” Coutts told AFP.

“In 2013, Emirates Team New Zealand had a budget of around $NZ180 million ($A177 million).

“You have to be smart about the way you are going to spend your money. But money is not the only factor and it’s not always the richest team which wins the Cup”.

The New Zealander, a five-time winner of the oldest international sporting trophy, said a realistic number of teams competing in 2017 would be “six or seven, including one or two Asian teams”.

So far five teams are officially entered: defending champions Oracle Team USA and challengers Team New Zealand, Artemis of Sweden, Britain’s Ben Ainslie Racing and Team France.


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Sailing on small ships gets closer to the treasures

Cruising by gulet — traditionally small, two-masted sailing vessels — is a wonderful way to explore places like Turkey, Greece and Italy. Peter Sommer Travels specializes in such adventures and offers small-group journeys (maximum of 18 people) aboard gulets to explore the cultural and archaeological treasures of those countries. For an even more interesting experience, the company will do custom gulet charters that can be based on its regular itineraries, or you can build your own itinerary. The cost for a one-week regularly scheduled cruise in Turkey runs about $3,260 per person double occupancy. If you charter and have a group of eight or more, the cost would be about the same. For a group of 12 or more, you get a better rate. In addition to room and board on the gulet, tours include a specialist guide and local guides when ashore, entrance fees, wine with dinner and more. Info: 855-443-3027, http://www.tinyurl.com/qgt869g

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The great outdoors and Wi-Fi

Reconnecting with nature and the outdoors was the No. 1 reason cited by fans of camping, according to the 2015 North American Camping Report. The report was based on a survey of nearly 3,000 people in the U.S. and Canada that was commissioned by Kampgrounds of America (KOA). Interestingly, despite the desire to get away, 70 percent of those polled said they go online at some point while camping, and free Wi-Fi was among the top three most important camping amenities. Clean and well-maintained restrooms/bath houses was easily the most-desired amenity, at 50 percent. Kid-friendly campgrounds earned the second spot at 20 percent, and Wi-Fi tied with acceptance of pets at 19 percent. Tents are the most common camping accommodation, at 54 percent, and the typical North American camper is likely to have started camping with parents before the age of 18. Read the whole report at http://www.tinyurl.com/n3mkgxq.

Students travel with a cause

Parents looking for summer opportunities for their high-school- and middle-school-age kids might want to consider VISIONS Service Adventures, which exposes participants to different cultures while they lend a hand to those less fortunate. In the U.S., for example, there are two- or four-week programs in northern Montana helping out on the Blackfeet reservation with home rebuilds or perhaps playground construction. In Cambodia, work might be a mix of construction and social-service activities. During off-hours participants are immersed in the local culture. There are also programs in countries where Spanish or French are the primary languages, giving kids a chance to strengthen their foreign-language skills. All programs have a leader-to-student ratio of 1 to 4 or 5, and to ensure that technology doesn’t get in the way of the learning experience, all electronics are collected and stored until the end of the program. An FAQ on the website covers the bases. Info: 406-551-4423, http://www.visionsserviceadventures.com

Marty is a freelance reporter for Tribune Newspapers.

Copyright © 2015, Chicago Tribune


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Sailors say the ancient technology of wind and water isn't hard to learn and can take you far

BOLTON LANDING, N.Y. – Spencer Raggio’s affair with sailing began on Boston Harbor aboard a sloop he chartered with a girlfriend late one August afternoon.

There was some breeze early. A four-hour sail turned into seven hours. They passed sunset and returned in the dark, ringed by the lights of Boston.

“It was just a beautiful night on the water,” Raggio said. Intrigued, he asked the skipper lots of questions.

Thirty years later, he has sailed off both coasts, the Great Lakes, Mexico and the Caribbean, often invited to crew on the sailboats of friends or other boat owners, usually in races. The marketing and communications executive keeps his own 26-foot sloop on Lake George, near his home in the southern Adirondacks, where the season starts in May.

Crewing is a common start. Clubs in popular sailing cities like San Diego, San Francisco and Miami host days where visitors can learn basics or meet owners who may invite them to do little more initially than help balance the boat.

In Annapolis, Maryland, Jeff Jordan said some days he’ll see 300 to 400 pleasure boats on Chesapeake Bay, nearly half of them sailboats.

“It’s easy certainly in this area to sail without having boat ownership,” said Jordan, director of J World sailing, which offers introductory lessons as well as three- and five-day classes that can lead to certificates. “Even in Iowa, at a little sailing club, just go down and be friendly. Someone will ask you if you want to go. … It’s an adult social sport.”

For novices who just walk down to the dock, it’s more common to get invited on a boat on race evenings, Jordan said. But it can take beginners some time to figure out exactly what the rest of the crew is doing. Jordan said he gets students who’ve done that and want to be more than just passengers; in a couple days of lessons, he said, they can become competent crew.

On 32-mile-long Lake George, where the season runs through October, Raggio teaches annual spring classes where novices learn the names and uses of the lines, aka ropes; how to manage two sheets, aka sails; and how to steer with the tiller and point the boat.

In two decades, the Y-Knot adult learn-to-sail program there has taught hundreds of novices how to tack and jibe, tie essential knots, and put up and take down the rigging. They use 20- to 24-foot-long sloops defined by their single mast and two sails. Each takes four or five students out for about four hours on three consecutive Sundays. This year, it costs $105.

“It was kind of magical being on Lake George in the sun and the wind,” said Diane Fiore, describing her first outing last year. An occupational therapist, she was preparing to volunteer with the Y-Knot program for disabled sailors.

This year, at 52, she’s taking the class for herself.

“If you have a wide open space and really get to play around, it’s not that complicated,” Fiore said.

Raggio loves the quiet of the motor-less boats.

“It’s a very back-to-nature experience,” he said.

Dan Kennedy teaches disabled sailors in two-seat, 16-foot sloops with simple controls and deep keels that keep them stable.

“It’s harmonious,” he said of the ancient art of capturing the wind to travel across the water. “It’s an amazing technology.”

Kennedy and Raggio said the number of sailboats on Lake George has declined. The last company to rent and charter sailboats on the lake stopped last year, they said.

“In the ’70s, there were 100 boats on Wednesday nights,” Raggio said of the weekly summer races he enters. “Now we see 18, 20, 22.”

Kennedy’s theory is that Americans have gotten lazier and would rather ride on motorboats.

On Chesapeake Bay, the number of sailboats declined four or five years ago after the recession, but the industry has recovered, Jordan said.

He added that there are, as Raggio has found, sailboats and owners all over. “It’s just a giant network and people are always looking for people to go sailing with them.”


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Teesdale Sailing Club partners up with outdoors club

PARTNERSHIP: Teesdale Sailing Club has joined forces with the Swaledale Outdoor Club



First published


in News


TEESDALE Sailing Club has partnered up with the Swaledale Outdoor Club to give their members access to sailing, facilities, boats and expertise.

The Swaledale Outdoor Club is based in Richmond and was formed nearly 50 years ago by a group of friends with a love of the outdoors.

Initially skiing, walking and climbing were offered but the club gradually added canoeing, cycling, potholing, mountain biking, fell running and orienteering.

Teesdale Sailing Club is 42 years old and doubled its membership last year after attracting funding to help develop its facilities.

Paul Brooks, Swaledale Outdoor Club chairman, said: “When Teesdale approached us with the idea of offering taster membership, allowing our people to ‘dip their toe’ into sailing, the whole committee agreed it could be of real value and interest to our members.’’

Paul Davison, Teesdale Sailing Club’s new commodore added: ‘‘We are really pleased to have forged this link with a like-minded organisation.

“With over 300 paid up members, Swaledale Outdoor Club proves that there is life after Playstation.

“We are very keen to introduce them to the thrills and pleasures of sailing, with a fair chance of dipping more than their toes into Grassholme’s water!’’

Tony Merry, Teesdale Sailing Club development officer added: “We are all really looking forward to the coming year.”

For more information visit swaledaleoutdoorclub.org.uk or teesdalesc.co.uk


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Sailing for novices often begins with invitations to crew

BOLTON LANDING, N.Y. (AP) — Spencer Raggio’s affair with sailing began on Boston Harbor aboard a sloop he chartered with a girlfriend late one August afternoon.

There was some breeze early. A four-hour sail turned into seven hours. They passed sunset and returned in the dark, ringed by the lights of Boston.

“It was just a beautiful night on the water,” Raggio said. Intrigued, he asked the skipper lots of questions.

Thirty years later, he has sailed off both coasts, the Great Lakes, Mexico and the Caribbean, often invited to crew on the sailboats of friends or other boat owners, usually in races. The marketing and communications executive keeps his own 26-foot sloop on Lake George, near his home in the southern Adirondacks, where the season starts in May.

Crewing is a common start. Clubs in popular sailing cities like San Diego, San Francisco and Miami host days where visitors can learn basics or meet owners who may invite them to do little more initially than help balance the boat.

In Annapolis, Maryland, Jeff Jordan said some days he’ll see 300 to 400 pleasure boats on Chesapeake Bay, nearly half of them sailboats.

In this Sunday, March 22, 2015 photo, sailor Spencernbsp;hellip;

“It’s easy certainly in this area to sail without having boat ownership,” said Jordan, director of J World sailing, which offers introductory lessons as well as three- and five-day classes that can lead to certificates. “Even in Iowa, at a little sailing club, just go down and be friendly. Someone will ask you if you want to go. … It’s an adult social sport.”

For novices who just walk down to the dock, it’s more common to get invited on a boat on race evenings, Jordan said. But it can take beginners some time to figure out exactly what the rest of the crew is doing. Jordan said he gets students who’ve done that and want to be more than just passengers; in a couple days of lessons, he said, they can become competent crew.

On 32-mile-long Lake George, where the season runs through October, Raggio teaches annual spring classes where novices learn the names and uses of the lines, aka ropes; how to manage two sails; and how to steer with the tiller and point the boat.

In two decades, the Y-Knot adult learn-to-sail program there has taught hundreds of novices how to tack and jibe, tie essential knots, and put up and take down the rigging. They use 20- to 24-foot-long sloops defined by their single mast and two sails. Each takes four or five students out for about four hours on three consecutive Sundays. This year, it costs $105.

“It was kind of magical being on Lake George in the sun and the wind,” said Diane Fiore, describing her first outing last year. An occupational therapist, she was preparing to volunteer with the Y-Knot program for disabled sailors.

In this Sept. 11, 2011 photo provided by YMCA Campnbsp;hellip;

This year, at 52, she’s taking the class for herself.

“If you have a wide open space and really get to play around, it’s not that complicated,” Fiore said.

Raggio loves the quiet of the motor-less boats.

“It’s a very back-to-nature experience,” he said.

Dan Kennedy teaches disabled sailors in two-seat, 16-foot sloops with simple controls and deep keels that keep them stable.

“It’s harmonious,” he said of the ancient art of capturing the wind to travel across the water. “It’s an amazing technology.”

Kennedy and Raggio said the number of sailboats on Lake George has declined. The last company to rent and charter sailboats on the lake stopped last year, they said.

“In the ’70s, there were 100 boats on Wednesday nights,” Raggio said of the weekly summer races he enters. “Now we see 18, 20, 22.”

Kennedy’s theory is that Americans have gotten lazier and would rather ride on motorboats.

On Chesapeake Bay, the number of sailboats declined four or five years ago after the recession, but the industry has recovered, Jordan said.

He added that there are, as Raggio has found, sailboats and owners all over. “It’s just a giant network and people are always looking for people to go sailing with them.”