Archive for » January 14th, 2018«

Trade commission must do what’s right for manufacturers across …

You may not know it, but there are nearly 12 million registered boats across the U.S. In 2016 alone, 141.6 million Americans went boating. that’s right, almost half the population.

These folks make a huge contribution to the U.S. economy, with direct spending of $37 billion on new boats and marine products and by simply participating in one of America’s favorite pastimes. Each year, 111,000 aluminum boats are manufactured and sold, representing 43 of all new boat sales.

Currently, there is a case before the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) that requires the attention of all boaters and all users of common alloy aluminum sheet.

 

Last Novemberthe Department of Commerce announced it would self-initiate anti-dumping (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations on common alloy aluminum sheets from China.

The rationale behind commerce’s decision is simple: Imports of common alloy sheet from China at reduced price may materially injure, or threaten material injury to, the domestic aluminum industry.

But commerce neglects to paint a full picture of the situation at hand, instead obscuring the facts and tipping the scale by self-initiating a process in which they play judge, jury, and executioner.

Rather than allowing the U.S. aluminum industry to pursue an AD and CVD investigation by submitting a petition — as has been standard practice since the passage of the Tariff Act of 1930 – the Department of Commerce has chosen to overreach by self-initiating this investigation.

After all, there’s a reason it has been over 30 years since the Department last did so. This kind of investigation, while presumably intended to level the playing field for American industry, could in fact do the exact opposite and harm American manufacturers.

The boating industry is a shining example of American manufacturing — in fact 95 percent of boats sold in the U.S. are made in the U.S. Our boats are made by Americans, for Americans. Recreational boating isn’t reserved for the elites and ultra-wealthy — it’s an accessible pastime enjoyed by millions of Americans from all walks of life.

Sixty two percent of boat owners have an annual household income of less than $100,000. Unfortunately, Commerce’s investigation threatens the recreational boating industry and the 650,000 American jobs it supports.

By initiating this investigation, Commerce stands to disrupt the existing supply chain of common alloy aluminum sheet, which is used in all kinds of every day products — from electronics, to recreational boats, vehicles, and trailers.

Like all American manufacturers, we believe wholeheartedly that American businesses and workers should be on a level playing field, and that bad actors should be punished. The Administration has indicated they will further examine China and other potential rogue actors that should be taken to task for unfairly manipulating markets.

But the government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers. In this instance, by potentially leveling the playing field for U.S. aluminum, which cites 3,700 impacted jobs, Commerce puts ours, and other parts of the American manufacturing industry, at a disadvantage.

To be clear, that means taking American jobs supported by industries that rely on common alloy aluminum sheets and putting them in jeopardy. By potentially doubling the price of the primary materials used to manufacture boats and marine products — ranging from pontoon and aluminum fishing boats to boat trailers. Commerce threatens to hamstring the recreational boating industry’s economic impact.

By way of next steps, the USITC will vote on the investigation on January 12 and is slated to issue preliminary determinations by Jan. 16.

Manufacturers across the country just hope the USITC will do what is right for all American workers.

Thom Dammrich is the President of the National Marine Manufacturers Association.


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Aluminum Trade: American Industry, American Workers Need Imports

[Editors note: On Friday, January 12, the US International Trade Commission determined that “there is a reasonable indication that a US industry is materially injured by reason of imports of common alloy aluminum sheet from China…”]

You may not know it, but there are nearly 12 million registered boats across the US In 2016 alone, 141.6 million Americans went boating – that’s right, almost half the population. These folks make a huge contribution to the US economy, with direct spending of $37 billion on new boats and marine products and by simply participating in one of America’s favorite pastimes. Each year, 111,000 aluminum boats are manufactured and sold, representing 43 percent of all new boat sales.

Currently, there is a case before the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) that requires the attention of all boaters and all users of common alloy aluminum sheet. Last November, the Department of Commerce (Commerce) announced it would self-initiate anti-dumping (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations on common alloy aluminum sheets from China. The rationale behind Commerce’s decision is simple: Imports of common alloy sheet from China at reduced prices may materially injure, or threaten material injury to, the domestic aluminum industry.

But Commerce neglects to paint a full picture of the situation at hand, instead obscuring the facts and tipping the scale by self-initiating a process in which they play judge, jury, and executioner.

Rather than allowing the US aluminum industry to pursue an AD and CVD investigation by submitting a petition – as has been standard practice since the passage of the Tariff Act of 1930 – the Department of Commerce has chosen to overreach by self-initiating this investigation. After all, there’s a reason it has been over 30 years since the Department last did so. This kind of investigation, while presumably intended to level the playing field for American industry, could in fact do the exact opposite and harm American manufacturers.

The boating industry is a shining example of American manufacturing – in fact 95 percent of boats sold in the US are made in the US. Our boats are made by Americans, for Americans. Recreational boating isn’t reserved for the elites and ultra-wealthy – it’s an accessible pastime enjoyed by millions of Americans from all walks of life. Sixty-two percent of boat owners have an annual household income of less than $100,000. Unfortunately, Commerce’s investigation threatens the recreational boating industry and the 650,000 American jobs it supports.

By initiating this investigation, Commerce stands to disrupt the existing supply chain of common alloy aluminum sheet, which is used in all kinds of every day products – from electronics, to recreational boats, vehicles, and trailers.

Like all American manufacturers, we believe wholeheartedly that American businesses and workers should be on a level playing field, and that bad actors should be punished.  The Administration has indicated they will further examine China and other potential rogue actors that should be taken to task for unfairly manipulating markets.

But the government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers. In this instance, by potentially leveling the playing field for US aluminum, which cites 3,700 impacted jobs, Commerce puts ours, and other parts of the American manufacturing industry, at a disadvantage. To be clear, that means taking American jobs supported by industries that rely on common alloy aluminum sheets and putting them in jeopardy. By potentially doubling the price of the primary materials used to manufacture boats and marine products – ranging from pontoon and aluminum fishing boats to boat trailers – Commerce threatens to hamstring the recreational boating industry’s economic impact.

Thom Dammrich is the President of the National Marine Manufacturers Association.


Similar news:

Trade commission must do what’s right for manufacturers across America

You may not know it, but there are nearly 12 million registered boats across the U.S. In 2016 alone, 141.6 million Americans went boating. that’s right, almost half the population.

These folks make a huge contribution to the U.S. economy, with direct spending of $37 billion on new boats and marine products and by simply participating in one of America’s favorite pastimes. Each year, 111,000 aluminum boats are manufactured and sold, representing 43 of all new boat sales.

Currently, there is a case before the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) that requires the attention of all boaters and all users of common alloy aluminum sheet.

 

Last Novemberthe Department of Commerce announced it would self-initiate anti-dumping (AD) and countervailing duty (CVD) investigations on common alloy aluminum sheets from China.

The rationale behind commerce’s decision is simple: Imports of common alloy sheet from China at reduced price may materially injure, or threaten material injury to, the domestic aluminum industry.

But commerce neglects to paint a full picture of the situation at hand, instead obscuring the facts and tipping the scale by self-initiating a process in which they play judge, jury, and executioner.

Rather than allowing the U.S. aluminum industry to pursue an AD and CVD investigation by submitting a petition — as has been standard practice since the passage of the Tariff Act of 1930 – the Department of Commerce has chosen to overreach by self-initiating this investigation.

After all, there’s a reason it has been over 30 years since the Department last did so. This kind of investigation, while presumably intended to level the playing field for American industry, could in fact do the exact opposite and harm American manufacturers.

The boating industry is a shining example of American manufacturing — in fact 95 percent of boats sold in the U.S. are made in the U.S. Our boats are made by Americans, for Americans. Recreational boating isn’t reserved for the elites and ultra-wealthy — it’s an accessible pastime enjoyed by millions of Americans from all walks of life.

Sixty two percent of boat owners have an annual household income of less than $100,000. Unfortunately, Commerce’s investigation threatens the recreational boating industry and the 650,000 American jobs it supports.

By initiating this investigation, Commerce stands to disrupt the existing supply chain of common alloy aluminum sheet, which is used in all kinds of every day products — from electronics, to recreational boats, vehicles, and trailers.

Like all American manufacturers, we believe wholeheartedly that American businesses and workers should be on a level playing field, and that bad actors should be punished. The Administration has indicated they will further examine China and other potential rogue actors that should be taken to task for unfairly manipulating markets.

But the government should not be in the business of picking winners and losers. In this instance, by potentially leveling the playing field for U.S. aluminum, which cites 3,700 impacted jobs, Commerce puts ours, and other parts of the American manufacturing industry, at a disadvantage.

To be clear, that means taking American jobs supported by industries that rely on common alloy aluminum sheets and putting them in jeopardy. By potentially doubling the price of the primary materials used to manufacture boats and marine products — ranging from pontoon and aluminum fishing boats to boat trailers. Commerce threatens to hamstring the recreational boating industry’s economic impact.

By way of next steps, the USITC will vote on the investigation on January 12 and is slated to issue preliminary determinations by Jan. 16.

Manufacturers across the country just hope the USITC will do what is right for all American workers.

Thom Dammrich is the President of the National Marine Manufacturers Association.


Similar news:

Outdoors notebook: Reward offered in game warden assault incident

Craig Bonds, inland fisheries chief for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, said fish smaller than 13 pounds caught from private waters will not qualify for entry into the new format for Toyota ShareLunkers.

Private waters largemouth bass of 13 pounds or more will be accepted as brood fish if caught by March 31, Bonds said. A private waters brood fish donor will not be eligible for prizes or offspring from the donated fish. The new ShareLunker rules are adapted from the Florida TrophyCatch program, which does recognize private waters fish.

In 2017, a 16-pound, 12-ounce bass was caught from Florida private waters. Without TrophyCatch recognition, that fish may never have been made public. It’s the biggest documented bass caught in Florida since 1986.

Boat, outdoor show is coming to Belton

The 42nd Annual Central Texas Boat and Outdoor Show is Jan. 26-28 at the Bell County Expo Center in Belton. Show promoter Bill Foster said this is the only boat and outdoor show between Dallas and Austin.

Foster said attractions include a kids’ fishing tank, though they’re still looking for a sponsor.

Hours are 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Details are online at centraltexasboatshow.com.

Market Hall to host boat expo

According to the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA), overall U.S. powerboat sales are expected to be up 6 percent in 2017. That’s about 260,000 boats valued at $3.7 billion. Texas ranks second only to Florida in boat sales. The DFW Boat Expo is set for Market Hall Feb. 2-11. Details are online at dallasboatexpo.com.

Cold winter may have its advantage

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials are hoping this winter’s cold weather will slow giant salvinia, an invasive aquatic plant renown for its fast growth, and taking over waterways from native plant species. That’s what happened after the freeze in 2010. Unfortunately, the same cold that kills giant salvinia also takes a toll on the weevils specially bred to eat the fast-spreading vegetation.


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