Archive for » October, 2017 «

MarineMax reports fourth quarter, fiscal year results

MarineMax, Inc. has announced its fourth quarter and fiscal year ending results. For the quarter ending Sept. 30, 2017, revenue grew more than 10 percent to $250.6 million from $227.4 million for the comparable quarter last year. Same-store sales for the quarter increased 5 percent on top of 12 percent growth for the same period last year.

Net income for the quarter was $3.9 million. Included in the quarter is $2.9 million of unusual expenses associated with Hurricane Irma. Excluding the Irma related expenses, pretax earnings rose 38 percent to $8.6 million for the fourth quarter, from $6.3 million in the comparable period last year. 

Irma shut down MarineMax’s largest market for two to four weeks in September, said William H. McGill, Jr., chairman and chief executive officer, during the company’s fourth quarter earnings call Tuesday morning. 

“We had damage at just about every facility in the state, and within 24 hours almost every store in clean-up mode,” he said.

However, shortly after Irma passed, the phones began ringing with customers asking about the status of their boats, McGill said.

For the fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2017, the company produced revenue growth of 12 percent to approximately $1.1 billion compared to $942.1 million in fiscal 2016.

Same-store sales for the year increased over 5 percent on top of 22 percent growth for the prior two consecutive fiscal years. Net income for the fiscal year was $23.5 million,  compared to $22.6 million in 2016.

Included in fiscal 2017 are the $2.9 million of unusual expenses associated with Hurricane Irma. Excluding the Irma related expenses, pretax earnings rose 17 percent to $40.7 million for the year, from $34.8 million in the prior year. Also included in fiscal 2017 are unusual tax-related items that reduced the company’s tax provision by $522,000 net. Included in fiscal 2016 is a deferred tax asset valuation allowance reversal of $1.1 million net.

While current trends in the industry remain positive, choppiness has continued in the 40-foot and larger boat segment, McGill said. MarineMax is working closely with its manufacturing partners to ensure inventory is aligned with retail trends.

“Fortunately, each of our manufacturers has done a good job launching new models in the last few years, leaving our inventory about as fresh as it has ever been,” McGill said. “We have also added initiatives to better align expenses with the current environment. We remain enthusiastic about the long-term strength of the industry and the business given the ongoing activity with our customers. As we look ahead, we remain committed to improving our earnings as the MarineMax team continues to execute on our customer centric approach in order to build upon our industry leading market share gains and efforts to build additional shareholder value.”

During the quarter, the company repurchased approximately 2.4 million shares of its common stock. As of Sept. 30, 2017, the company had approximately 387,000 shares remaining under its Aug. 2, 2017, repurchase plan.

“The MarineMax Team delivered a strong close to the fiscal year as we did our best to overcome the challenges brought on by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey,” McGill said. “Our results in the fourth quarter, considering the impact to the state of Florida, our largest market, is a testament to our customers’ desire for the boating lifestyle, our team’s passion for MarineMax and the strategies that have led to our industry leading results. In the fourth quarter and fiscal year, we were able to grow sales and expand gross margins, driven by improving product margins and meaningful contributions from our higher margin businesses.”



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Boaters, and their Irma insurance checks, due to boost sales at Fort Lauderdale boat show

The northern eye wall of Hurricane Irma swept up Bill Keogh’s Carolina Skiff, Sophia, and spun her upside down like a wrestler in a power slam. After the storm, she lay hull-up at the marina at Old Wooden Bridge Fishing Camp in Big Pine Key.

Now, thanks in part to an insurance check, Keogh is in the market for a replacement, and at the perfect time, too. Later this week, he’ll make the three hour-drive north to the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The annual showcase is expected to teem with fellow boaters impacted by Hurricane Irma.

“Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop,” Keogh said.

He hasn’t attended the show in 15 years, he said, but will travel there this year in the hopes that a new boat will help him restart his kayak business, Big Pine Kayak Adventures, by Thanksgiving. Of his 140 kayaks, about 55 survived the storm — some turning up as far north as Daytona Beach — and now all he’s missing is the skiff.

Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop.

Bill Keogh, owner of Big Pine Kayak Adventures

Keogh said he didn’t get as much as he expected from his insurance claim on Sophia — about a third what he thought her true value was — but with some savings, he think he can manage the $25,000 to $40,000 price tag on the boat he wants.

“[The boat show] gives me the opportunity to pick the right one and take my time,” Keogh said. “I’d like to get up there and just get on the boats and see how they feel and what the layout is and what I’d like to modify.”

The boat show kicks off its preview day Wednesday and then runs Thursday through Sunday across six marinas in Fort Lauderdale and the Broward County Convention Center. More than 1,200 vessels will be displayed in the water, with another 400-plus on land from about 1,400 exhibitors.

Show organizers are forecasting a busier-than-usual event: Last week, online ticket sales were 16 percent ahead of the same time in 2016, said Andrew Doole, vice president and general manager of Informa, the company that runs that boat show. About 100,000 people attended the event last year, a 5 percent increase from 2015.

The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show will showcase more than 1,200 boats in the water and more than 400 on land and about 1,400 exhibitors.

Part of that is the Irma effect, he said.

“We expect there will be a lot of insurance checks that will be spent at the show,” he said, both from boaters looking for new vessels, parts or repairs and marinas looking to rebuild docks and boat lifts.

It’s still unclear how many insurance claims have been filed related to Irma; the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation doesn’t subdivide Irma insurance claims to reflect boat losses. As of Oct. 20, 79,401 claims had been reported for other lines of business — the designation that would include cars and boats. Nearly 61 percent of those claims have already been closed.

Overall, more than $5.3 billion in insurance claims have been filed since Irma’s passage on Sept. 10.

IMG_IRMA0912_ROAD_CTJ_2_1_ACCCCJ3S_L342442236

Both the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the Boat Owners Association of The United States estimate the boat loss during Irma — numbers that will likely be available sometime in November — will be far below the losses during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when 65,000 recreational boats were damaged or lost.

“There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats,” said Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association, which runs the Miami International Boat Show in February. “That will play itself out over the next 18 months or so and it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.”

There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats…it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.

Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association

The $36 billion U.S. boating industry is already sailing smoothly as it is, thanks to strong consumer confidence bolstered by a low unemployment rate (4.2 percent in September) and high stock market, Dammrich said. Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018, the marine manufacturers association predicts.

That wave of strong sales, helped along by Irma claims, will likely mean a busy Miami boat show come February.

Still, that doesn’t mean some boaters in the areas hardest hit by the storm — particularly in the Florida Keys and the Caribbean — will be able to break away from rebuilding to attend the shows, Dammrich said.

“To bug out during this time, it’s kind of challenging,” Keogh, of Big Pine Kayak Adventures, added.

Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018.

But Doole of the Fort Lauderdale show said he’s been surprised by the number of vendors from the Caribbean that are still able to make it out to the show.

“We thought some of the large charter yachts …might not come, but I think the charter brokers got creative and are sending some of the clients,” Doole said.

And, added Dammrich, the faster they get new boats, the faster they are back in business and on their feet.

“If you area charter boat captain and you need that boat to make a living, you are going to find your way up to these shows to get what you need,” he said. “The fact that boat sales are strong and consumer confidence is strong and more people are buying more boats, I think that will kind of overwhelm the negative.”

If you go

The 58th Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show

Where: Across seven locations: Bahia Mar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; The Sails Marina, 2150 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Hall of Fame Marina, 435 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Fort Lauderdale Hilton Marina, 1881 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Pier 66 Marina, 2301 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; and Las Olas Municipal Marina, 2 South New River Dr. East, Fort Lauderdale.

When: Preview day on Wednesday from noon to 7 p.m., Thursday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

How: Preview tickets are $46.50 and general admission is $29 for adults and $12 for children ages 6 to 15. Children under 6 enter free.


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NMMA reports Tampa Boat Show attendance increase

The Progressive Insurance Tampa Boat Show, produced by the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA), wrapped up Sunday, Oct. 15, with a final attendance of 18,561, up 12 percent from 2015, the last time the show was held during October.

The show dates were moved to October from their traditional September dates due to an abundance of caution surrounding Hurricane Irma. Initial reports out of the show were of strong sales and quality crowds.

This year’s show was also the test site for NMMA’s new boat and sport show lead generation and consumer engagement platform, Boater Pass, which saw success among attendees and exhibitors.

“We had a successful show despite the change in dates, with a 12 percent increase in attendance comparative to other shows held in October,” said Kevin Murphy, show manager, Progressive Insurance Tampa Boat Show. “We heard from many exhibitors that the weekend was full of quality crowds filled with serious buyers.”

Feedback from exhibitors was positive, with many reporting strong sales and quality attendees.

“We had a fantastic show—there was great traffic all three days, said Steve Wacker, Thunder Marine. “We were thrilled that the crowds came out even after the date change due to the Hurricane and as a result of the buying crowd the show attracted and NMMA’s new Boater Pass, we’re confident we’ll close several more deals after the show.”

New this year, NMMA partnered with FISH Technologies to launch the Boater Pass program. Boater Pass is a lead generation and consumer engagement platform that attendees register for onsite, online or by downloading the My Boater Pass app.

By registering for their Boater Pass, attendees are able to collect information on products and exhibitors throughout the show, scan at instant win prize towers, and share their information quickly by having their Boater Pass scanned by an exhibitor.

“We were able to leverage the Boater Pass program to provide us and our exhibitors’ rich insights into our show attendees while at the same time giving the consumer an improved and gamified show experience,” said Jennifer Thompson, vice president of consumer and trade events for NMMA. ”The Boater Pass program allows us to better track consumer behavior, understand attendees’ expressed and inferred interests, and then use that knowledge in real-time to marry buyers with our exhibitors—all while providing our exhibitors a new way to engage and qualify leads.”

Exhibitors using the Engage App from FISH Technologies had the ability to scan an attendee’s Boater Pass QR code and instantly know their contact details, boat ownership status, intent to purchase and more. They were then able to save those leads and add their own notes for follow-up—all with a simple easy-to-use app.

“The Boater Pass program is a game changer for the industry and the future of boat shows,” said Steve Heese, president of Chris-Craft. “In Tampa, our team was able to quickly qualify leads, making the time spent at the show more efficient for us and for our prospective customers, resulting in a great show for our dealers.”

NMMA and FISH Technologies have entered into an agreement to bring the Boater Pass program to the upcoming Progressive Insurance Miami International Boat Show.

For more information on Boater Pass and how to get onboard for the upcoming Miami show, contact Jennifer Thompson at jthompson@nmma.org or Mike Gilvar with FISH Technologies at mgilvar@fishisdata.com.



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Fort Lauderdale boat show expects sales boost from Irma | Miami …

The northern eye wall of Hurricane Irma swept up Bill Keogh’s Carolina Skiff, Sophia, and spun her upside down like a wrestler in a power slam. After the storm, she lay hull-up at the marina at Old Wooden Bridge Fishing Camp in Big Pine Key.

Now, thanks in part to an insurance check, Keogh is in the market for a replacement, and at the perfect time, too. Later this week, he’ll make the three hour-drive north to the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The annual showcase is expected to teem with fellow boaters impacted by Hurricane Irma.

“Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop,” Keogh said.

He hasn’t attended the show in 15 years, he said, but will travel there this year in the hopes that a new boat will help him restart his kayak business, Big Pine Kayak Adventures, by Thanksgiving. Of his 140 kayaks, about 55 survived the storm — some turning up as far north as Daytona Beach — and now all he’s missing is the skiff.

Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop.

Bill Keogh, owner of Big Pine Kayak Adventures

Keogh said he didn’t get as much as he expected from his insurance claim on Sophia — about a third what he thought her true value was — but with some savings, he think he can manage the $25,000 to $40,000 price tag on the boat he wants.

“[The boat show] gives me the opportunity to pick the right one and take my time,” Keogh said. “I’d like to get up there and just get on the boats and see how they feel and what the layout is and what I’d like to modify.”

The boat show kicks off its preview day Wednesday and then runs Thursday through Sunday across six marinas in Fort Lauderdale and the Broward County Convention Center. More than 1,200 vessels will be displayed in the water, with another 400-plus on land from about 1,400 exhibitors.

Show organizers are forecasting a busier-than-usual event: Last week, online ticket sales were 16 percent ahead of the same time in 2016, said Andrew Doole, vice president and general manager of Informa, the company that runs that boat show. About 100,000 people attended the event last year, a 5 percent increase from 2015.

The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show will showcase more than 1,200 boats in the water and more than 400 on land and about 1,400 exhibitors.

Part of that is the Irma effect, he said.

“We expect there will be a lot of insurance checks that will be spent at the show,” he said, both from boaters looking for new vessels, parts or repairs and marinas looking to rebuild docks and boat lifts.

It’s still unclear how many insurance claims have been filed related to Irma; the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation doesn’t subdivide Irma insurance claims to reflect boat losses. As of Oct. 20, 79,401 claims had been reported for other lines of business — the designation that would include cars and boats. Nearly 61 percent of those claims have already been closed.

Overall, more than $5.3 billion in insurance claims have been filed since Irma’s passage on Sept. 10.

IMG_IRMA0912_ROAD_CTJ_2_1_ACCCCJ3S_L342442236

Both the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the Boat Owners Association of The United States estimate the boat loss during Irma — numbers that will likely be available sometime in November — will be far below the losses during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when 65,000 recreational boats were damaged or lost.

“There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats,” said Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association, which runs the Miami International Boat Show in February. “That will play itself out over the next 18 months or so and it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.”

There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats…it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.

Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association

The $36 billion U.S. boating industry is already sailing smoothly as it is, thanks to strong consumer confidence bolstered by a low unemployment rate (4.2 percent in September) and high stock market, Dammrich said. Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018, the marine manufacturers association predicts.

That wave of strong sales, helped along by Irma claims, will likely mean a busy Miami boat show come February.

Still, that doesn’t mean some boaters in the areas hardest hit by the storm — particularly in the Florida Keys and the Caribbean — will be able to break away from rebuilding to attend the shows, Dammrich said.

“To bug out during this time, it’s kind of challenging,” Keogh, of Big Pine Kayak Adventures, added.

Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018.

But Doole of the Fort Lauderdale show said he’s been surprised by the number of vendors from the Caribbean that are still able to make it out to the show.

“We thought some of the large charter yachts …might not come, but I think the charter brokers got creative and are sending some of the clients,” Doole said.

And, added Dammrich, the faster they get new boats, the faster they are back in business and on their feet.

“If you area charter boat captain and you need that boat to make a living, you are going to find your way up to these shows to get what you need,” he said. “The fact that boat sales are strong and consumer confidence is strong and more people are buying more boats, I think that will kind of overwhelm the negative.”

If you go

The 58th Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show

Where: Across seven locations: Bahia Mar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; The Sails Marina, 2150 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Hall of Fame Marina, 435 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Fort Lauderdale Hilton Marina, 1881 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Pier 66 Marina, 2301 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; and Las Olas Municipal Marina, 2 South New River Dr. East, Fort Lauderdale.

When: Preview day on Wednesday from noon to 7 p.m., Thursday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

How: Preview tickets are $46.50 and general admission is $29 for adults and $12 for children ages 6 to 15. Children under 6 enter free.


Similar news:

Boaters, and their Irma insurance checks, due to boost sales at Fort Lauderdale boat show

The northern eye wall of Hurricane Irma swept up Bill Keogh’s Carolina Skiff, Sophia, and spun her upside down like a wrestler in a power slam. After the storm, she lay hull-up at the marina at Old Wooden Bridge Fishing Camp in Big Pine Key.

Now, thanks in part to an insurance check, Keogh is in the market for a replacement, and at the perfect time, too. Later this week, he’ll make the three-hour drive north to the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The annual showcase is expected to teem with fellow boaters impacted by Hurricane Irma.

“Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop,” Keogh said.

He hasn’t attended the show in 15 years, he said, but will travel there this year in the hopes that a new boat will help him restart his kayak business, Big Pine Kayak Adventures, by Thanksgiving. Of his 140 kayaks, about 55 survived the storm — some turning up as far north as Daytona Beach — and now all he’s missing is the skiff.

Enough time has passed, enough insurance checks have been cut, that they probably will shop.

Bill Keogh, owner of Big Pine Kayak Adventures

Keogh said he didn’t get as much as he expected from his insurance claim on Sophia — about a third what he thought her true value was — but with some savings, he think he can manage the $25,000 to $40,000 price tag on the boat he wants.

“[The boat show] gives me the opportunity to pick the right one and take my time,” Keogh said. “I’d like to get up there and just get on the boats and see how they feel and what the layout is and what I’d like to modify.”

The boat show kicks off its preview day Wednesday and then runs Thursday through Sunday across six marinas in Fort Lauderdale and the Broward County Convention Center. More than 1,200 vessels will be displayed in the water, with another 400-plus on land from about 1,400 exhibitors.

Show organizers are forecasting a busier-than-usual event: Last week, online ticket sales were 16 percent ahead of the same time in 2016, said Andrew Doole, vice president and general manager of Informa, the company that runs that boat show. About 100,000 people attended the event last year, a 5 percent increase from 2015.

The Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show will showcase more than 1,200 boats in the water and more than 400 on land and about 1,400 exhibitors.

Part of that is the Irma effect, he said.

“We expect there will be a lot of insurance checks that will be spent at the show,” he said, both from boaters looking for new vessels, parts or repairs and marinas looking to rebuild docks and boat lifts.

It’s still unclear how many insurance claims have been filed related to Irma; the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation doesn’t subdivide Irma insurance claims to reflect boat losses. As of Oct. 20, 79,401 claims had been reported for other lines of business — the designation that would include cars and boats. Nearly 61 percent of those claims have already been closed.

Overall, more than $5.3 billion in insurance claims have been filed since Irma’s passage on Sept. 10.

IMG_IRMA0912_ROAD_CTJ_2_1_ACCCCJ3S_L342442236

Both the National Marine Manufacturers Association and the Boat Owners Association of The United States estimate the boat loss during Irma — numbers that will likely be available sometime in November — will be far below the losses during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when 65,000 recreational boats were damaged or lost.

“There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats,” said Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association, which runs the Miami International Boat Show in February. “That will play itself out over the next 18 months or so and it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.”

There were some boats that were lost and there will be people looking for new boats…it will have a positive impact but it’s not going to be anything big.

Thom Dammrich, president of the National Marine Manufacturers Association

The $36 billion U.S. boating industry is already sailing smoothly as it is, thanks to strong consumer confidence bolstered by a low unemployment rate (4.2 percent in September) and high stock market, Dammrich said. Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018, the marine manufacturers association predicts.

That wave of strong sales, helped along by Irma claims, will likely mean a busy Miami boat show come February.

Still, that doesn’t mean some boaters in the areas hardest hit by the storm — particularly in the Florida Keys and the Caribbean — will be able to break away from rebuilding to attend the shows, Dammrich said.

“To bug out during this time, it’s kind of challenging,” Keogh, of Big Pine Kayak Adventures, added.

Unit sales of new powerboats increased 6 percent in 2016 and are expected to increase another 6 percent this year and through 2018.

But Doole of the Fort Lauderdale show said he’s been surprised by the number of vendors from the Caribbean that are still able to make it out to the show.

“We thought some of the large charter yachts … might not come, but I think the charter brokers got creative and are sending some of the clients,” Doole said.

And, added Dammrich, the faster they get new boats, the faster they are back in business and on their feet.

“If you area charter boat captain and you need that boat to make a living, you are going to find your way up to these shows to get what you need,” he said. “The fact that boat sales are strong and consumer confidence is strong and more people are buying more boats, I think that will kind of overwhelm the negative.”

If you go

The 58th Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show

Where: Across seven locations: Bahia Mar Yachting Center, 801 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Broward County Convention Center, 1950 Eisenhower Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; The Sails Marina, 2150 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Hall of Fame Marina, 435 Seabreeze Blvd, Fort Lauderdale; Fort Lauderdale Hilton Marina, 1881 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; Pier 66 Marina, 2301 SE 17th St., Fort Lauderdale; and Las Olas Municipal Marina, 2 South New River Dr. East, Fort Lauderdale.

When: Preview day on Wednesday from noon to 7 p.m., Thursday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

How: Preview tickets are $46.50 and general admission is $29 for adults and $12 for children ages 6 to 15. Children under 6 enter free.


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Crevalle 26 Open Boat Review

Fishing Features

Our second spot — a series of dock pilings — held more than just mangrove snapper, as Badzinski found out after his first cast. A powerful fish — a big snook, we presume — inhaled the live bait and streaked away against a tight drag, weaving its way through the encrusted pilings. Badzinski braced his knees against the padded coaming bolsters that bracket the interior as he struggled to stop the fish, but to no avail. The line parted.

Having spooked that spot, we moved on to fish the abutments of the Tom Adams Bridge. During the cruise, I explored the fishing features of this 26 Open, which include six gunwale rod holders along each side. I also found four rod holders across the leaning post, and another quartet on the hardtop, plus two holders for live-bait trolling. You can stash a pair of sticks under the gunwales, with tips extending into ports under the aft casting deck.

 


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Motorhead: Volvo Penta D13

Inboard or IPS, the D13 is a 12.8 liter ( 781 cubic inches, for you old school motorheads), inline-6, that produces 1,000 horsepower at the crankshaft. It boasts a 131 mm (5.1 in) bore and a 158 mm (6.2 in) stroke. The maximum rated engine speed is 2400 rpm. It weighs 3,605 pounds as a bobtail ( with no gear).

Historically, a key characteristics of Volvo Penta diesel engines has been torque, and, according to Bering, the D-13 continues that tradition. The D13 produces near peak torque at just 1100 rpm, peaks at 1900 rpm and falls of at a very shallow angle from that engine speed to WOT. That shallow decline is what Bering described as a torque rise, stating that it is a design mandate that, “ every Volvo Penta diesel exhibit a torque rise in the cruising band of rpm.” What this means is, that, as horsepower decreases, torque increases.
In actual running-the-boat terms,consider a following sea scenario. The boat drives into the back of a wave. Power drops. But since torque increases, the boat climbs the backside with authority. At the helm, you may not have even needed to advance the throttle. This characteristic delivers a feeling of confidence and authority to the skipper. Especially, Bering adds, when coupled to the dual-propeller IPS drives: “ Its one of the best ways to get the torque from the engine actually into the water.”


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On The Street

• The University of Minnesota Extension of Douglas County thanked outgoing committee member Kelly Lund of Brandon for serving six years as a member of the Douglas County Extension Committee. The Extension Committee, in partnership with the University of Minnesota, assists in approving programs, establishing budgets and selecting and evaluating professional extension staff. Extension is an outreach arm of the University of Minnesota which connects community needs with university resources. Those interested in serving as a member of the Douglas County Extension Committee should contact their county commissioner.

• Alexandria has a new business, a consultancy focused on developing strengths and leadership. Karin Weigel launched Cultivate 2 Conquer and will work with students, youths, parents, schools, businesses and teams. Weigel has five years of experience and is a Gallup certified strengths coach. She helps clients develop their strengths, something they are innately good at, as well as recognize the strengths of those around them. Cultivate 2 Conquer is on Facebook.


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Nixon’s Marina adds Skeeter Boats line-up

Skeeter Products, Inc., the leader in performance fishing boats is excited to announce it has joined with Nixon’s Marina as they open their second authorized dealership. Nixon’s is fully equipped to support the sales and service of all Skeeter Boats’ products. Through years of experience, Nixon’s has created a dealership facility that offers a high level of professionalism and customer service.

“We are extremely pleased to add another dealership with Nixon’s Marina to our list of northern dealers. They have a dealership culture and customer centric business philosophy that lines up perfectly with the values and goals that we manage our business by at Skeeter Boats,” Jeff Wooldridge, National Sales Manager, Skeeter Boats.

Nixon Marina will handle the sales and service responsibility for Skeeter Boats from its additional location at 8100 Tacoma Mall Blvd. Lakewood, WA. (360) 353-8401

Skeeter Boats and Nixon’s deliver quality product and service to form a business partnership that makes for a perfect fit in our norther market.

About Skeeter Boats

Skeeter Boats, a Yamaha Boat Company, has been a proud supporter of America’s fishing consumers for almost 70 years. Skeeter Boats is the recipient of 16 consecutive NMMA® C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index awards, and its boats are certified to meet strict U.S. Coast Guard and American Boat Yacht Council standards. For more information visit www.skeeterboats.com


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