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Nautical Flea Market, Boat Show sets up shop on Lovers Key – The News

Mark Generales promises an “extraordinary” weekend at Lovers Key State Park with its first Nautical Flea Market and Boat Show.

“I’m really hopeful it will become a big part of Southwest Florida events as years go on,” he said.

The three-day market, sponsored by Friends of Lovers Key and the Rotary Club of Bonita Springs, opens Friday and features six boat dealers, 60 vendors, food by Fitzgerald’s and a beer tent.

The vendors will have nautical-themed clothing, antique rods and reels, lures, sunglasses, artwork, stand-up paddleboards, old and new engines, and other fishing equipment.

Vendors include Branching Out/B.O.S.S. Tackle, with antique  tackle boxes, Robin R Designs with handcrafted wood wall hangings that have nautical and beach themes, and The Old Fishing Guy with lures, rods and reels going back to the 1940s. And other vendors will offer underwater fish lights and waterproof packs.

“The antique lures and fishing rods are going to be great,” Generales said. “Some of the artwork people are really going to be appreciative of. The clothing folks are offering things, in some cases, that are one of a kind and what’s not, at prices you can’t get in stores.”

Raja Associates owner Peter Fournier, of Fruitland, decided he’d take a chance on the market, figuring the boat dealers would draw some upscale customers. He handcrafts pens from 100 varieties of wood from all over the world, he said, including rosewood from across Central America. He has a supplier of  woolly mammoth tusk from Alaska that he uses, as well as alligator jawbone, walrus bone and water buffalo horn.

His favorite wood to work with is the Banksia nut from Australia, which has a swirled, speckled grain.

“It’s a beautiful wood,” he said.

While he has many designs, he recently branched out into nautical themes, including inlaid images of lighthouses, tall ships, and scuba divers. He also offers pen holders with miniature divers helmets, propellers, compasses and ships wheels.

The pens run from $29 to $600.

Generales,  a Rotary and Friends of Lovers Key board member, said he was inspired the Dania Marine Flea Market in Hallandale Beach and Islamorada’s Gigantic Nautical Flea Market.

“The Dania market is the largest in the world,” he said. “It’s huge. It runs for four days, and it’s our model.”

Opened in 1979, it  had 300 vendors with 1,000  stalls during its annual run  in early March.

The Islamorada market is operated by the local Rotary to fund its scholarships. It offers more than 200 vendors for two days each February.

Generales said the Bonita Springs club and the Friends of Lovers Key will split the profits for their respective  groups.

“Both organizations are always seeking to do what they can to raise funds to do important work in the community,” he said. “They’re always looking for fresh ideas, looking for events that have succeeded.”

While the Friends group funds improvements at the park, the Rotary club sponsors food drives, scholarships and vaccinations for low-income residents, among many others.

He said he’s hoping the sale will grow each year, and other groups can use it as fundraisers, asking members and soliciting donations of unused boat parts and water sports supplies.

“Come on in, grab a beer, get something to eat,  and check out what the exhibitors have for sale,” Generales said. “It should be a great time.”

If you go

What:  The first Lovers Key Nautical Flea Market and Boat Show, featuring 60 vendors with nautical themes and several boat sales companies.

When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Where: The large field to the west of Estero Boulevard at Lovers Key State Park,  8700 Estero Blvd, Fort Myers Beach

Cost: $5 donation; parking is free.

Information: http://loverskeynauticalmarket.com/


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Radio sales to reshape the airwaves

CBS’s decision to sell off nearly 120 radio stations had local industry insiders buzzing about the future of the five in Boston — WBZ AM, The Sports Hub, WZLX, Mix 104 and AMP 103 — and who would be the likely buyers.

And depending on how the sale shakes out, Entercom — owner of WEEI, WRKO and WAAF — could become a key player in the game.

“There aren’t a lot of people out there who can buy all the markets,” said Bruce Mittman, owner of Community Broadcasting, which boasts 44 small-market radio stations. “But Entercom could buy a couple of markets, including Boston.”

CBS is looking for a buyer to take the whole radio division off its hands, but that may be wishful thinking. Two of the nation’s biggest radio groups — iHeart (owner of KISS 108, Jamn’ 94.5 and 101.7 The Bull in Boston) and Cumulus (owner of stations in Worcester and Springfield) — are buried in debt and likely are unable to finance a purchase of the CBS stations, Mittman said.

Other possible suitors include Alpha Media and Connecticut-based Townsquare Media. But thus far both have concentrated on accumulating small-market stations.

If CBS cannot find a buyer for the whole division, it may have to sell the group off in pieces, local experts said. That is where Entercom could come into play. The company might be interested in adding to its holdings in Boston — where it is relatively weak — as well as in Philadelphia, where it is based, and possibly even a third market.

Entercom already owns a sports station here — WEEI — but would no doubt love to control the fate of arch-rival The Sports Hub. The rest of the CBS Boston stations do not compete with any of Entercom’s other local holdings, which is a plus, and, with the exception of AMP, they are all successful.

The other big local player, Greater Media, which owns Magic 106.7, Country 102.5, WROR, WBOS and HOT 96.9, is not expected to be in the hunt. The company is privately owned and debt-free. The owners are unlikely to want to rock the boat with an ambitious expansion, insiders say.

The FCC limits the number of radio stations that any one entity can own in each market. So if the CBS stations are sold to a competing local entity, they would no doubt have to divest one or more of the stations that they already own.

Radio consultant Donna Halper said CBS has an ideal situation in Boston — one of the few places where an AM station, WBZ, is “getting great ratings and turning a profit.”

“You have The Sports Hub which is doing incredibly well on FM but unlike most cities, you have an AM (WBZ) doing incredibly well,” Halper said.

The CBS Hub stations, she said, will most likely be sold as a package. “Years ago, you could make a living just with an AM station or just with an FM station, but those days are long gone,” Halper said. “I would be very surprised if somebody tried to pick off one and not the others. It will probably be a group that they’re sold as.”

Added Talkers Magazine publisher Michael Harrison: “If they can make the best deals by selling them piecemeal and selling them to a number of buyers, they’ll do that.”

 


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Brunswick CEO banks on boats, not bowling

CHICAGO – Mark Schwabero, 63, was elevated to chairman and CEO of the 171-year-old Brunswick Corp. last month, putting him in charge of the world’s largest provider of marine engines, pleasure boats, fitness equipment and billiards products. But not bowling.

In 2014, Brunswick, based in suburban Chicago, sold its retail bowling business to Bowlmor AMF for $270 million. The company sold its bowling products line – balls, shoes and bags – to a private investment firm last year for an undisclosed price.

Schwabero, who previously served as Brunswick’s chief operating officer, was instrumental in the decision to jettison bowling, which had dwindled to less than 5 percent of revenue, in favor of its core businesses. Brunswick sales were up 7 percent last year to $4.1 billion.

The marine division, which includes everything from Mercury engines to boat lines such as Bayliner, Boston Whaler, Lund and Sea Ray, represents 80 percent of revenue. The fitness segment accounts for the balance and includes Life Fitness, Hammer Strength and Cybex, which Brunswick acquired in January for $195 million.

Energetic, amiable and plain-spoken, Schwabero roams his third-floor office, moving from a standing desk to demonstrate calf raises while passing an exercise ball around his waist – all using Brunswick products.

He also sat for at least part of an interview with the Chicago Tribune. This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: Brunswick was been synonymous with bowling for more than a century. Why sell it?

A: When we considered the overall growth opportunities for the business, bowling was a historic part of the company but wasn’t something we saw as being strategic on a go-forward basis. So we elected to sell the business.

Q: What did you do with the proceeds from the sale?

A: We had $270 million in proceeds from bowling retail, and we’ve basically taken that and invested it in our marine parts and accessories business and our Life Fitness businesses and the recent acquisition of Cybex.

Q: Brunswick was hard-hit during the recession, as U.S. powerboat sales sunk from 300,000 to 130,000 a year. At the time, the company was losing money and some analysts questioned whether it would survive. How did you right the ship?

A: We closed a lot of plants on the boat side of the business and significantly cut back employment levels. We had to resize the company for the reality of the market, and took about $450 million in fixed costs out of the company. Boat sales have made a steady recovery to about 170,000 per year, but we are actually more profitable today than when the industry was at 300,000.

Q: One of your boat lines, Boston Whaler, was featured prominently in an episode of Jerry Seinfeld’s web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” where guest Jimmy Fallon went for a cruise in Seinfeld’s own prized boat. What’s the deal with Boston Whaler?

A: Well, it’s literally unsinkable. There was a commercial way back when where they literally cut a boat in half and both halves were out on the water with people on them. There is a bit of a cult around them, just like Harleys. Boston Whaler is an iconic brand.

Q: Any other celebrity boat owners in the Brunswick family?

A: Billy Joel is a huge Sea Ray fan. The Bush family has a Fountain boat with Mercury power. I’ve been out at Kennebunkport, Maine, with the president (George H.W. Bush). We deliver boats to NFL players.

Q: You just became CEO. What are your plans to grow the business?

A: The growth will come from either our core business or adjacencies that we add to our core business. We’ve done six acquisitions in the last 18 months – four that build up our marine parts and accessories business and two for our fitness business.

Q: Your office has a traditional desk and a standing desk, which is part of your new InMovement office exercise product line. What is the premise behind this?

A: We’re really creating a business of changing how people work. The vast majority of most people’s workday is sedentary. In addition to the standing desk, we also have a treadmill desk. It only goes up to 2 miles per hour. There’s no reason you can’t be on a treadmill desk doing your conference call and getting activity while you’re at work. It’s good for the person, it’s good for the business.

Q: You run a recreation products company. What do you do for recreation?

A: It’s kind of hard to be in this industry and not have a boat. So I have a couple of boats. I like to boat and if I can find a little free time, I don’t mind playing a round of golf, but of late, that’s been kind of few and far between.

I’ve got a boat in the summer, and go out on Lake Michigan. And I’ve got a pontoon out on a lake back in Ohio where I grew up.

Q: You sold the bowling segment. Why not divest billiards?

A: It’s a small part of our business, but we’re still the biggest player in the billiards space. It’s the namesake of the company.

Tribune Content Agency 


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Glasstream announces potential expansion during unveiling of boat …

Glasstream Powerboats exports

Glasstream Powerboats exports

Drew Enfinger (left) and Louis Cardonia of Glasstream Powerboats assemble the stringing and electronics on a boat inside of the Dothan manufacturing plant on Friday.



Posted: Tuesday, March 15, 2016 3:55 pm
|


Updated: 5:53 pm, Tue Mar 15, 2016.

Glasstream announces potential expansion during unveiling of boat built for government operations

Ebony Davis
Business Reporter

dothaneagle.com

The story at Glasstream Powerboats in Dothan on Tuesday was one of promises kept, jobs created and business relationships made.

Glasstream officials unveiled the first unit of The Relentless, a coastal interceptor vessel built by Glasstream founder A.L. Kirkland for use by both military/government entities and recreational markets. Glasstream Director of Sales Doug Brogdan said the company has completed its first shipment of 35 of The Relentless units to an allied U.S. power, and is working on two more orders of a greater magnitude.

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Fixing up donated boats for Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation

Looking after Lake Wylie isn’t a contest, but C.D. Collins would earn a pretty high seed if it were.

Collins moved to his waterfront home 56 years ago on the Belmont side near York County. He joined the new Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation 18 years ago, an environmental watchdog group, which annually holds a clean-up event. Registration for starts this week for the May 21 event.

It’s to the point where, apart from hauling his grandchildren for family time, Collins forgets he can take a boat ride just to enjoy it.

“Every time I go out on the lake,” he said, “I’m looking for problems.”

Over time, his passions for boating and looking out for “the river” merged. It started with a cast-aside boat here or there, and Collins realized he could take boats others didn’t want and fix them up.

“In 56 years, I have owned a great many boats and worked on them myself,” he said.

He can’t recall how long he’s been at it, repairing donated boats and selling them. He knows he hasn’t pocketed a dime. All the money from sales goes to the foundation.

The arrangement isn’t easy, but it works. Because of its nonprofit tax status, the foundation is an appealing recipient for donations. Because many in the foundation are boaters, many donations have come from like-minded water watchers and friends.

“They’re wanting to help us any way they can,” Collins said.

Recently, Collins found help in Chuck Myers, head of the Mountain Island Lake Covekeepers. He came down for his third trip Thursday to help Collins work on the four boats next in line for sale.

Myers said the issues facing Mountain Island Lake, the drinking water source for Charlotte, mirror Lake Wylie – runoff from construction sites, sedimentation, overall water quality.

Both men are retired, both in their 70s. Both have a long-lasting love for boating, and clear reminders of how important environmental work can be. They just look at their crew when they launch their boats.

“I’ve got three grandkids living with me, so I’ve got to have something to keep them busy,” Myers said.

As the area grows, so does the number of boats coming in for donations. Collins used to have one or two at a time. Now he has four, plus a personal watercraft he’s fixing up for Covekeeper patrols. He won’t be selling that one. Instead, he’s looking for a trailer and port donation.

“Using this, we can get to areas we’ve never been able to get to before,” Collins said.

With more boats comes more opportunity, but also more challenges.

“I don’t have trailers for any of them, but I can help transport them on my trailers,” Collins said.

Collins can’t count how many hours he’s put into repair over the years. He’d rather not count the money poured into boat trailers. Close to a half dozen sit on his property just for transporting different types of donated boats.

Right now he has three 24-footers, all pontoons built from 1990 to 1999. He has a 1986 bowrider. Occasionally a boat comes in great shape. All of them, Collins said, leave that way.

“They usually aren’t in condition where they’re ready to go when we get them,” he said.

Late Thursday, an ideal day for boating, Collins lay almost hidden in the bottom of a donated pontoon, tinkering to get it presentable and in good running order. He put his hands into the outer workings of an outboard engine, inches from the lake he loves so much but far from thoughts of relaxing on it.

That same day, the foundation sorted out a move from its home of many years to another in Charlotte.

“We’re moving uptown,” Collins said. “Our rent is going up, and we can always use any funds we can get our hands on.”

John Marks: 803-831-8166

What’s for sale?

1999 Harris-Kayote pontoon, 24-foot with a 100 horsepower Mercury engine

1999 Harris pontoon, 24-foot with a 55 horsepower Johnson engine

1990 Crest pontoon, 24-foot with a 70 horsepower Johnson engine

1986 Searay bowrider with a V8 engine

For more on boats for sale for the Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation, or to donate items, call 704-825-3588 or 704-616-6009.


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In the boat and yacht market, there’s smooth sailing ahead

Savvy agents and brokers can take advantage of carriers' healthy appetites in this market, where low gas prices helped buoy sales of recreational watercraft in 2015.
Savvy agents and brokers can take advantage of carriers’ healthy appetites in this market, where low gas prices helped buoy sales of recreational watercraft in 2015.

As summer approaches, boat owners look forward to spending weekends cruising lakes and waterways. However, this past winter served as a reminder that a boat doesn’t have to be at sea to be at risk: January snows collapsed docks and boat slip roofs at marinas in Kentucky, severely damaging hundreds of boats and even pushing several craft past the point of reclamation.

Fortunately for insurers, these types of claims have not been enough to turn the tide of profitability they have enjoyed in recent years. “We had just a phenomenal season [in 2015] for boating, with no significant catastrophes,” says Todd Shasha, managing director of Travelers’ personal insurance boat and yacht unit.



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Springline Yacht Sales receives Best in Show at the New England Boat Show

MYSTIC, Conn. — The New England Boat Show has grown into the Northeast’s largest indoor boat show, attracting thousands from the New England Seaboard. Travelling to the show with five boats, Springline was awarded Best in Show for their sailboat display.

“This year was the North American debut for Elan and Impression Yachts,” said Rick Dieterich, president of Springline. “Show attendees really appreciated the Elan and Impression.”

Springline also brought two Catalinas – selling both – and a Blue Jacket 40 – winner of Boat of the Year from Cruising Magazine.

See Springline at the Connecticut Spring Boat Show in Essex, Conn., May 12-14 with the in water debut of Elan and Impression Yachts.

“We are looking forward to warmer weather and to highlighting the Elan products for their first North American in-water showing,” said Dieterich.

With representatives in Mystic, Conn., Mamoroneck, N.Y. and Quebec, Canada, Springline is always ready to assist. For further information, visit: www.SecureYourDream.com or call 860-817-7676.



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Brunswick makes wave by using pin money for boating – Quad

CHICAGO (TNS) — Mark Schwabero, 63, was elevated to chairman and CEO of the 171-year-old Brunswick Corp. last month, putting him in charge of the world’s largest provider of marine engines, pleasure boats, fitness equipment and billiards products.

But not bowling.

In 2014, Brunswick, based in suburban Chicago, sold its retail bowling business to Bowlmor AMF for $270 million. The company sold its bowling products line — balls, shoes and bags — to a private investment firm last year for an undisclosed price.

Schwabero, who previously served as Brunswick’s chief operating officer, was instrumental in the decision to jettison bowling, which had dwindled to less than 5 percent of revenue, in favor of its core businesses. Brunswick sales were up 7 percent last year to $4.1 billion.

The marine division, which includes everything from Mercury engines to boat lines such as Bayliner, Boston Whaler, Lund and Sea Ray, represents 80 percent of revenue. The fitness segment accounts for the balance and includes Life Fitness, Hammer Strength and Cybex, which Brunswick acquired in January for $195 million.

Schwabero grew up in New Knoxville, a tiny town in northwest Ohio. He earned a bachelor’s and master’s in industrial and systems engineering at Ohio State University, where he lived in a dorm overlooking the football stadium for most of his college days.

He went to work at an International Harvester (now Navistar) truck manufacturing plant in Springfield, Ohio, where he became plant manager at 29 and rose through the corporate ranks over 17 years. Schwabero later held executive positions with AlliedSignal, Bosch Braking Systems, Libbey-Owens-Ford and Hendrickson International.

In 2004, Schwabero joined Brunswick as president of its largest subsidiary, Fond du Lac, Wis.-based Mercury Marine, commuting two hours on weekends between Fond Du Lac and his Chicago-area home. His commute got a little bit shorter in 2014, when he joined the parent company in suburban Chicago as president and COO.

Brunswick moved to its current headquarters in 1993. Inside the spacious lobby are iconic pieces of history — a vintage pool table, a Boston Whaler boat and a pinsetter from the recently sold bowling division.

Energetic, amiable and plain-spoken, Schwabero roams his third-floor office, moving from a standing desk to demonstrate calf raises while passing an exercise ball around his waist — all using Brunswick products.

While acknowledging bowling’s historic role at Brunswick, he said the company didn’t see it as being strategic on a go-forward basis and elected to sell the business.

“We had $270 million in proceeds from bowling retail, and we’ve basically taken that and invested it in our marine parts and accessories business and our Life Fitness businesses and the recent acquisition of Cybex,” he said.

Brunswick was hard-hit during the recession, as U.S. powerboat sales sunk from 300,000 to 130,000 per year. To right their ship, Brunswick closed a lot of plants on the boat side of the business and significantly cut back employment levels.

“We had to resize the company for the reality of the market, and took about $450 million in fixed costs out of the company,” Schwabero said. “Boat sales have made a steady recovery to about 170,000 per year, but we are actually more profitable today than when the industry was at 300,000.

The growth will come from either our core business or adjacencies that we add to our core business,” he said. “We’ve done six acquisitions in the last 18 months — four that build up our marine parts and accessories business and two for our fitness business.”

Schwabero’s office includes both a traditional desk and a standing desk, part of Brunswick’s new InMovement office exercise product line.

“We’re really creating a business of changing how people work,” he said. “The vast majority of most people’s workday is sedentary.

“In addition to the standing desk, we also have a treadmill desk,” he said. “It only goes up to 2 miles per hour. There’s no reason you can’t be on a treadmill desk doing your conference call and getting activity while you’re at work.

“It’s good for the person, it’s good for the business.”


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Water ebbing in north Louisiana, rising at Mississippi line

As floodwaters began receding Monday in northwest Louisiana, emergency officials along Louisiana’s southeastern border with Mississippi were watching the rise of the Pearl River amid widespread flooding that has damaged thousands of homes.

The water has started to ebb from flooded subdivisions in south Bossier City on the Red River in northern Louisiana.

National Weather Service forecaster C.S. Ross in Shreveport says it will take at least a week before homeowners can get back to their homes and assess the damage. A 6-mile section of U.S. Highway 71 from Bossier Parish into Red River Parish was covered by water.

Ross said Red Chute Bayou on the east side of Bossier City did not top the levee as feared. He said there was some seepage, but not enough to reach 3,500 homes.

In Arkansas, a fast-moving weekend storm system brought rain, hail and reports of several tornadoes.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Michael Brown says as many as four possible tornadoes may have touched down amid Sunday evening’s severe weather. Weather Service crews will survey the areas Monday.

Meanwhile, the National Weather Service has pushed back to timeline of flooding from the Pearl River at the southern end of the Louisiana-Mississippi line.

Forecaster Phil Grigsby predicts the Pearl River could reach 21 feet by late Tuesday or early Wednesday — the height of a 1983 flood.

Hancock County Emergency Management Agency Director Brian Adam said he’s been told to expect 5 to 7 feet of water.

Adam said some 100 to 200 homes around Pearlington, Mississippi could take on water.

At least four deaths have been reported in Louisiana amid the flooding that began last week and the search continued for two fishermen missing since Wednesday in Mississippi.

In southeastern Louisiana, St. Tammany Parish officials said the town of Pearl River already was seeing flooding in one neighborhood.

Farther to the south, officials were warning residents in eastern Slidell to be vigilant about rising water.

Flood warnings were in effect for most of north Louisiana and scattered sections in the southern part of the state. In Mississippi, flooding warnings are in effect for areas along streams and bayous.

Louisiana emergency officials said nearly 5,000 homes were damaged. That number is expected to rise as more reports come in from areas still battling floodwaters. Mississippi reported that 185 homes were damaged by floodwaters and about 650 homes sustained minor damage.

The flood waters have caused several roads in a south Mississippi county to collapse.

Lt. Bill Davis with the Bossier Parish Sheriff’s Office said anyone with flood damage should report it to their parishes’ homeland security office.

“Once the water goes down, cleanup kits will be made available” Davis said. “By the weekend, we should have a plan for distribution.”

On Sunday, President Barack Obama signed an order declaring the flooding in Louisiana a major disaster. The president’s declaration triggers federal aid for flood victims.

It’s the most widespread non-hurricane flooding the Louisiana National Guard has ever dealt with, said Col. Pete Schneider, a guard spokesman.

The National Guard said it had about 1,200 soldiers and air crews at work in flooded areas throughout Louisiana, deploying in high-water vehicles, boats and three helicopters. National Guard crews had evacuated more than 4,255 people and 354 pets as part of its round-the-clock operations by Monday morning.

The Guard had also issued more than 71,570 bottles of water to Richland, Natchitoches, Vernon and Winn parishes, 576 MREs to Winn Parish and over 1 million sandbags to affected parishes.


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The Latest: Pearl River on the rise | The News Tribune

The Latest on Pearl River flooding along the Louisiana-Mississippi border (all times local):

6:55 a.m.

Emergency officials in Louisiana and Mississippi are watching the rise of the Pearl River which divides the two states.

The National Weather Service predicts the Pearl could reach 21 feet by Monday afternoon — the height of the 1983 flood. This could mean 100 to 200 homes will take on water around Pearlington, Mississippi.

Hancock County Emergency Management Agency Director Brian Adam says flooding will extend to Mississippi 604.

In Louisiana, St. Tammany Parish officials say the town of Pearl River in the eastern part of the parish is already seeing some flooding in one neighborhood.

Farther to the south, official are warning residents in eastern Slidell to be vigilant about rising water Monday.

4:15 a.m.

Widespread flooding in Louisiana and Mississippi has damaged thousands of homes, and the risk of rising water prompted additional evacuations Sunday.

At least four deaths have been reported in Louisiana amid the flooding that began last week, and the National Guard has rescued nearly 3,300 residents. Two fishermen have been missing for days in Mississippi.

Flood warnings were in effect across the region as many rivers remained dangerously high. Also of concern was another line of thunderstorms that hit parts of Oklahoma, Arkansas, northern Louisiana and northern Mississippi on Sunday night, bringing more rain and reports of tornadoes in Arkansas.


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