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Growing market for eco-friendly marine solutions drive sales at …

Mar 13 2016

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-ASIS Boats reports record sales of electric-powered support craft for yacht owners during region’s largest boat show-

The growing appetite for eco-friendly marine solutions in the yachting world was evident at this year’s Dubai International Boat Show, when leading marine craft manufacturer ASIS Boats reported record sales of 12 of their revolutionary electric jet tenders. Enjoying its global debut this year’s show, the 3.2m electric jet driven support craft offers a more efficient, economical and convenient alternative to traditional fuel-powered tenders.

Commenting on the exceptional response to the launch of the new tender, Roy Nouhra, Founder President of ASIS Boats said: “Interest in our new product has been overwhelming, not only with the number of immediate sales at the show, but also the significant number of enquiries we have received from boat owners around the world. It is clear that a new cleaner and more eco-friendly alternative for support craft is very attractive for the yachting world, particularly as our product doesn’t compromise on power or performance.

“The electric jet tender also improves safety on board yachts, alleviating the need to carry tanks of highly flammable fuel and additional haz mat equipment on board.”

Always at the forefront of engineering innovation, ASIS Boats invest heavily in Research Development to ensure they remain ahead of their competition with pioneering products that respond to customers’ specific requirements. As a manufacturer ASIS Boats follows applies environmentally-conscious policies across all areas of its business.

A manufacturer and supplier of military, government, security, coastguard and industry marine craft around the world, ASIS Boats are unparalled in their speed, manoeuvrability, reliability, seaworthiness, safety and stability in the most adverse conditions, in all climates and at the highest speeds. One of the few manufacturers in the world to gain US Coastguard Sub-Chapter T approval, ASIS Boats has both European CE approval, as well as US-certification from NMMA, SOLAS and ABYC bodies.

To learn more about ASIS Boats and their extensive advanced marine solutions visit www.asisboats.com

-End-

About ASIS Boats
ASIS Boats is a world leader in advanced maritime solutions for leisure, commercial and military customers. One of the largest manufacturers of rigid inflatable boats globally, the UAE based company provides a full turnkey service that includes specification consultancy, design, manufacture, training, delivery and after sales support. Manufactured in a facility that has earned ISO 9001 certification, ASIS boats have both European CE approval and U.S. certifications from NMMA and ABYC bodies. ASIS Boats is also one of very few manufacturers in the world to gain US Coastguard Chapter T approval. Combining expertise, credibility, innovation, safety, performance and uncompromising quality enables ASIS Boats to provide the best possible solutions to any customer requirement.

ASIS Boats are sold in 80 countries and support navies, coastguards, anti-piracy, security and riverine patrols for military and special forces in the US, Europe, Africa, Far East, South America and the Middle East.

Like ASIS Boats on: www.facebook.com/ASIS.Boats

Follow ASIS Boats on: @ASISBOAT

Media Contact:
Mutaz Albadri
Mojo PR
+971 (0)50 570 6785
mutaz@mojo-me.com

© Press Release 2016


© Copyright Zawya. All Rights Reserved.



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Growing market for eco-friendly marine solutions drive sales at Dubai Boat Show

Mar 13 2016

more articles from

-ASIS Boats reports record sales of electric-powered support craft for yacht owners during region’s largest boat show-

The growing appetite for eco-friendly marine solutions in the yachting world was evident at this year’s Dubai International Boat Show, when leading marine craft manufacturer ASIS Boats reported record sales of 12 of their revolutionary electric jet tenders. Enjoying its global debut this year’s show, the 3.2m electric jet driven support craft offers a more efficient, economical and convenient alternative to traditional fuel-powered tenders.

Commenting on the exceptional response to the launch of the new tender, Roy Nouhra, Founder President of ASIS Boats said: “Interest in our new product has been overwhelming, not only with the number of immediate sales at the show, but also the significant number of enquiries we have received from boat owners around the world. It is clear that a new cleaner and more eco-friendly alternative for support craft is very attractive for the yachting world, particularly as our product doesn’t compromise on power or performance.

“The electric jet tender also improves safety on board yachts, alleviating the need to carry tanks of highly flammable fuel and additional haz mat equipment on board.”

Always at the forefront of engineering innovation, ASIS Boats invest heavily in Research Development to ensure they remain ahead of their competition with pioneering products that respond to customers’ specific requirements. As a manufacturer ASIS Boats follows applies environmentally-conscious policies across all areas of its business.

A manufacturer and supplier of military, government, security, coastguard and industry marine craft around the world, ASIS Boats are unparalled in their speed, manoeuvrability, reliability, seaworthiness, safety and stability in the most adverse conditions, in all climates and at the highest speeds. One of the few manufacturers in the world to gain US Coastguard Sub-Chapter T approval, ASIS Boats has both European CE approval, as well as US-certification from NMMA, SOLAS and ABYC bodies.

To learn more about ASIS Boats and their extensive advanced marine solutions visit www.asisboats.com

-End-

About ASIS Boats
ASIS Boats is a world leader in advanced maritime solutions for leisure, commercial and military customers. One of the largest manufacturers of rigid inflatable boats globally, the UAE based company provides a full turnkey service that includes specification consultancy, design, manufacture, training, delivery and after sales support. Manufactured in a facility that has earned ISO 9001 certification, ASIS boats have both European CE approval and U.S. certifications from NMMA and ABYC bodies. ASIS Boats is also one of very few manufacturers in the world to gain US Coastguard Chapter T approval. Combining expertise, credibility, innovation, safety, performance and uncompromising quality enables ASIS Boats to provide the best possible solutions to any customer requirement.

ASIS Boats are sold in 80 countries and support navies, coastguards, anti-piracy, security and riverine patrols for military and special forces in the US, Europe, Africa, Far East, South America and the Middle East.

Like ASIS Boats on: www.facebook.com/ASIS.Boats

Follow ASIS Boats on: @ASISBOAT

Media Contact:
Mutaz Albadri
Mojo PR
+971 (0)50 570 6785
mutaz@mojo-me.com

© Press Release 2016


© Copyright Zawya. All Rights Reserved.



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Heber Springs past chamber director lauded

Talk about making a good impression — Jo Price volunteered to answer the phones at the Heber Springs Area Chamber of Commerce. Barely a month later, she was its executive director.

“To be honest with you, that was the coolest thing I’ve ever done,” she said of the top job.

Price was honored at the chamber banquet in February with the Distinguished Citizen Award. It was presented by state Rep. Josh Miller, R-Heber Springs.

“I feel kind of guilty getting this award. I really appreciate it, and I’m humbled about it, but it’s not just me — it’s so many people. I was just a teeny-tiny portion of that,” she said.

That’s a modest description, given the accomplishments made during her tenure.

Price said she considers Heber Springs her hometown, but she grew up on a farm in Palmer, Illinois.

“I’ve baled hay and milked cows and taken care of chickens,” she said. Her parents moved to Heber Springs to retire, and she moved to the community in 1979 and met her husband, Mike, there. They married in 1982.

She worked in real estate and was a substitute teacher for six years while she raised their children.

“I was a jack-of-all-trades,” she said.

Her husband, a chamber member, came home one day and said the executive director was leaving. He suggested that she volunteer.

“They were desperate for somebody to answer the phones,” she said. Price volunteered, and she was one of two people in the office.

The board asked her to take the executive director’s position almost immediately. Because it was all new to her, it was an “overwhelming position,” she said. “We had all these events approaching, and I kind of thrive on events and planning — that’s kind of my nature,” she said.

The popular Fourth of July Fireworks Extravaganza hadn’t been held the year before, for some reason, Price said, “and people were pretty upset about that.”

Ricky Davis, who owns Sonic restaurants in Heber Springs and other locations, came to see her, she said. He offered to help her get the event off the ground again. “Rick was the biggest one who pushed for it, and he helped go out and helped get people to commit to it,” she said.

“The lake is just a sea of boats; it’s the most beautiful thing you’ve ever experienced,” Price said. “It’s become a very significant tradition for a lot of families.”

Without time to take a breath, the World Championship Cardboard Boat Races were next, and “people came out of the woodwork” to help, she said.

One of her favorite parts of the job was working with potential business owners.

“I loved the part when people were wanting to come and put a business in,” she said. “I liked sitting down with them and being real with them about what all goes into starting a business.”

Price said she and the chamber were part of an economic-development team that helped pass a countywide sales tax in 2000 to support the growth of Arkansas State University-Heber Springs, which was then in the industrial park.

“We did a lot of pushing, a lot of interviews,” she said.

In 2006, the university purchased land that included Sugarloaf Mountain.

Price has devoted countless hours to preserving the mountain, too. She is a member and past president of the Sugarloaf Heritage Council, which was formed in 2007 to preserve the county landmark.

“The Sugarloaf Heritage Council is probably one of the hardest-working boards I’ve ever been part of,” she said. “There is significant graffiti on Sugarloaf Mountain. I used to come visit my parents before I moved here and climbed Sugarloaf and have pictures in the mid-’70s of me sitting at the base of the mountain and graffiti in the background. It kind of makes you mad to think somebody tears down something that’s such a monumental icon.”

Price said she and other members use mops and brooms to spread a substance on the graffiti, and use ropes to haul power washers up the mountain summit to clean it.

She was also right in the middle of the Our Town Committee,

which the chamber spearheaded in 2005. Residents were surveyed about activities and facilities they wanted to see in Heber Springs.

“Our team worked day and night,” she said. “That was a cool thing I got to be part of, too. When it came down to it, they wanted a community center. Walking trails were way, way up there.”

A 1-cent sales tax and a $16 million bond issue were approved by Heber Springs residents to build a community/aquatics center and sports complex.

Davis was involved in the group, and he said Price was the one who “held it all together” and kept him organized.

He said Price hired Arlene Anderson and Ina Brown for the chamber staff.

“Those three ladies, mainly with the leadership of Jo Price, took that chamber to a level it had never seen before,” he said.

Price is also president of the Greers Ferry Lake Trails Council, which works in partnership with the city. The council received a state grant and improved one trail to the Sugarloaf Mountain summit by adding benches; built and paved Hidden Pond Trail, which is handicapped-accessible; and built a 1.2-mile trail around the base of the mountain.

Her latest endeavor is getting an 11-mile Sulphur Creek Trail finished from the ballpark on the west end of town to tie into the Sugarloaf Mountain trails. A $2 million capital campaign should kick off soon for the project, Price said. One portion is finished, a half-mile trail between Fourth and Broadway streets.

Price has focused on getting easements from property owners along the old Missouri and North Arkansas Railroad right of way, which will be the route the trail will follow.

“It’s taken about two years to find the lineage of the old railroad, who got the land when the railroad disappeared,” she said. “It’s been a big chore, but I love it. That’s the kind of challenges I like.”

She said 14 property owners have given easements, so far, with just a few more to pursue.

“People have just been so kind,” she said. “It has been phenomenal. The city has agreed to take care of it and maintain it so it won’t be junkie or trashy.”

Also in the years she was executive director, the Cleburne County Community Foundation was created to award grants to nonprofit organizations. “That has been a significant thing in our community, and I just happened to be the chamber of commerce director,” she said.

“Lots of chamber members have said they got two for the price of one when I was hired, because Mike was a hands-on support,” Price said of her husband. “He has had so much faith in me. He has always pushed me to go outside of my comfort zone.”

But she emphasized the dedication of the people in the community.

“I’m just telling you, the people of Heber Springs are just fabulous. Anything I was a part of was not Jo Price; it was totally a community effort and extraordinary people who backed me up. The chamber of commerce, and anything we have accomplished, [involved] a huge team of people with extraordinary talents.

“A person is only as good as the people they surround themselves with,” Price said.

Senior writer Tammy Keith can be reached at (501) 327-0370 or tkeith@arkansasonline.com.

Niche Publications Senior Writer Tammy Keith
can be reached at 501-327-0370
or
tkeith@arkansasonline.com.


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Salmon permit prices plunge while halibut soars | Alaska Dispatch …

Fire sale salmon prices last year and a dim outlook for the upcoming season have caused the value of Alaska fishing permits to plummet.

At the other extreme, the prices for halibut catch shares have soared to “unheard-of levels,” according to Olivia Olsen of Alaskan Quota and Permits at Petersburg.

Starting with salmon permits:  “A lot of people had disastrous seasons last year, whether it was drift gillnet or seine permits, and the values have declined dramatically,” said Doug Bowen of Alaska Boats and Permits in Homer.  

At Alaska’s bellwether Bristol Bay fishery, a base sockeye price of 50 cents a pound helped push drift gillnet permit prices into the $98,000 range, down from $175,000 last spring. 

“That may be the bottom; they seem to have come up a bit,” Bowen said. “But it’s still way below what they were trading for at this time last year.”

Lower prices haven’t sparked much interest in Bristol Bay drift permits — nor for salmon seine cards across the state. 
Seine permits in Prince William Sound are priced in the $150,000 range, down from more than $200,000 a year ago. Kodiak seine permits have sunk to less than $40,000, and a Cook Inlet drift permit is valued in the $60,000 range.  

Bowen doesn’t expect the tide to turn soon.

“I’m afraid a lot of the same factors that contributed to the low prices we saw last year are pretty much the same this year. It’s not an optimistic outlook for salmon, and that is depressing the market for permits, and also the boats,” he added. “There are lots on the market, lots of sellers, not that many buyers.”

“There’s not a lot of extra money floating around in the salmon industry. So folks wanting to upgrade their vessels or pick up permits in another area, we’re just not seeing that happening.”

The situation is slightly better in Southeast Alaska, where driftnet permits are generating some interest.

“More than I thought compared to all the other salmon areas,” said Olsen of Alaskan Quota and Permits at Petersburg.

“We started at $78,000 in November and drifts now are going for $85,000 and they may creep up from there. Same with power troll permits. They’ve been pretty steady sales at about $35,000, which is down about $6,000 from last year but still a pretty good price when you listen to all the talk about bad salmon prices. Hand troll permits also are on the upswing to $12,000,” Olsen said. 

Both brokers said salmon permit prices tend to tick upward closer to salmon season.

“I think the main issue is what we are going to see for prices,” Bowen and Olsen said.

 

Halibut shocker

This year’s small increase in the halibut quota combined with hopes of a repeat of $6 to $7 per pound prices was enough to send quota share prices skyrocketing. 

“There was a big rush after the halibut numbers were announced in late January,” said Olsen of Petersburg.

For the first time in nearly two decades, the coast-wide halibut catch was increased — by 2.3 percent to nearly 30 million pounds. Alaska’s share of 21.45 million pounds is up 200,000 pounds.

“Quota prices shot up $10 a pound since December,” Olsen said of Southeast shares. “We have current sales pending at $63 and $65 per pound, with rumors of going higher. Those prices are just unheard of, and to jump up that high in that short period of time — oh, my golly!”

Are people buying at those nosebleed prices?

“There’s a lot of people drawing the line, but there are a few who have bought,” Olsen said.

The same holds true for quota prices in the Central Gulf, Alaska’s largest halibut fishing hole.

 “Those are bumping up to $60,” said Doug Bowen of Alaska Boats and Permits in Homer. “We’ve had offers of $59 but no takers. Quota shares for the Western Gulf have increased by around $5 and are in the $40s if you can find it. There is strong interest there and also in Bering Sea regions. But it’s the same scenario — more buyers than sellers and the market is really tight.”

        

Got ice? 

A grassroots push is underway in Kodiak for a self-pay icehouse and crane at Oscars Dock in the downtown harbor.

“It’s common in fishing communities throughout Alaska and the nation,” said Theresa Peterson, a fisherman and outreach director for the Alaska Marine Conservation Council. “It’s kind of strange that Kodiak doesn’t have this facility, being that we are the No. 2  port in the nation and home to the largest and most diversified fleet in Alaska.”

The need and benefits go far beyond commercial fishing, Peterson stressed. It would serve Kodiak’s five outlying villages, whose residents travel by boat to town and load/offload provisions, sport charter operators, recreational anglers and hunters.

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak, who calls Kodiak’s lack of a public icehouse “flabbergasting,” is worried that without one, the island’s fleet of small salmon boats may be driven out of business. 

“More processors are requiring RSW (refrigerated sea water) systems and are phasing out all the iceboats. Only a few processors are still accepting fish iced in holds, and most of those are grandfathered in,” Kasprzak said. “So all these little boats that don’t have room for RSW or don’t have the money are walking on pins and needles. But if there’s public ice, that will change things dramatically.”    

Kasprzak said there’s another reason ice is especially important for a community like Kodiak.

“Our waters are warming. Right now temperatures are at 7 degrees over normal. Last summer the water at Prince William Sound reached 60 degrees. Our RSW systems aren’t built to handle those temperatures.  The Kodiak processors didn’t have enough ice for boats last salmon season because it was so hot. There’s more of a need now for a community icehouse than ever.”

The Kodiak City Council will hear the issue on March 15.

Laine Welch is a Kodiak-based commercial fishing columnist . Contact her at msfish@alaskan.com.

 

 


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