Archive for » October 11th, 2014«

Former boat dealer ordered to pay penalties, restitution

Posted: Thursday, October 9, 2014 3:00 pm

Former boat dealer ordered to pay penalties, restitution


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LITTLE ROCK — A former Cleburne County boat dealer who swindled consumers out of the money he owed them for consignment sales has been ordered to pay civil penalties and restitution of more than $170,000, Attorney General Dustin McDaniel announced today.

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    Thursday, October 9, 2014 3:00 pm.


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    Sailing

    Race forecasters warned the 66 sailors taking part that heavy rain and strong winds would greet them on day one of the 36,739-mile voyage around the world that begins with an Atlantic crossing to Cape Town, via the Mediterranean, expected to take around three weeks.

    The warning evoked memories of the start of the last edition in 2011 when two boats were forced to quit on day one after suffering crippling damage during an electrical storm in the Mediterranean.

    This time a new one-design boat that is built for durability has been introduced for all the teams.

    A Dutch crew, Team Brunel, led by 51-year-old skipper Bouwe Bekking was the first to set sail from Alicante.

    They face opposition from teams from Spain, Abu Dhabi, the United States/Turkey, Denmark, China and Sweden.

    The latter, Team SCA, is the first all-women crew to contest the event in 12 years.


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    Jet boats and more at Tampa Bay Boat Show

    TAMPA — Like many die-hard “prop” men, I once snubbed my nose at jet-powered watercraft. A dedicated outboard owner, I dismissed these recreational vessels as nothing more than jet skis on steroids.

    Times have changed.

    “Where’s my ride?” I asked Justin Greene, pointing to a beefy boat on the back of a trailer outside Barney’s Motorcycle Marine in St. Petersburg. “I’m here to do a test drive.”

    One of the perks of being an outdoors writer is that you get to check out all sorts of watercraft. This weekend’s Tampa Bay Boat Show at the Florida State Fairgrounds will feature dozens of boat dealers from both sides of the bay, showing everything from flats skiffs to cabin cruisers.

    So when I went through the list of manufacturers, I really had my pick of the fleet. Over the years, I’ve tested everything from motorized canoes to offshore race boats (I find the former functional, but the latter more enjoyable). This time, the choice was easy.

    “I like to go fast. Real fast,” I told Greene, Barney’s sales manager. “I’d want to get his baby out on the open water and crank it.”

    While this Yamaha 242 is fresh off the showroom floor, jet boats are nothing new. I first ran across them back in the late ’80s in New Zealand, where the Kiwis had been using them for decades to run shallow boulder-strewn rivers.

    Any boater will tell you that rocks and props don’t mix. So a jet drive, which utilizes an impeller system, has no outward moving parts, so nothing to bend or break when it hits something.

    “They are really much safer,” said Greene. “They are especially well suited for running in sensitive areas such sea grass beds. They are also manatee friendly.”

    Yeah, yeah, I thought. I’ve heard it all before. Sounds good, but I wanted power, enough umph to get the hull out of the hole and up on a plane without waiting for the tide to turn. The jet boats of old, or at least the ones that I’d run before, barely had enough energy to get off the floor and up on the couch.

    “You will be surprised,” Greene said. “This new Yamaha is bigger and better than any jet boat I’ve ever seen. It’s got a lot of muscle.”

    At first glance, the 242 had me looking for a stern drive. It looked too big for a jet boat. What’s more, it seats 12 (adults, not preschoolers) and has carrying capacity of 2,700 pounds, which is more than many bay boats.

    With an 8-foot 6-inch beam, the platform is astonishingly stable. And the twin 1.8 liter, high-output engines give it plenty of power to top out, fully loaded, at more than 50 mph.

    But the real question was, how does it handle?

    I found out pretty quickly. Doing donuts at full throttle in the middle the bay is my kind of fun. Smiling ear to ear, I burned off a few gallons of fuel before Greene grabbed the keys so he could head back to the showroom to get the boat ready for the fairgrounds.

    “I need one,” I told him. “If I could only convince my wife.”

    For many would-be boat buyers, the choice often comes down to performance or function. I’ve always looked at utility, but a 24-foot jet boat, while not a fishing craft, seems like the ideal family-fun machine. Fast, yet easy to operate, the 242 is the perfect way to get to a sandbar sunset.

    “This is the ideal family boat,” Greene said. “But you don’t have to go this big to get the kids out on the water.”

    The Yamaha 242 will be on display at this weekend’s Tampa Bay Boat Show with a list price of $58,499. The price is reasonable in a market where high-end bay boats can go for more than $100,000. But you don’t have to spend that much to get into a jet boat. Yamaha makes a 19-footer that starts at $27,499.


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    Sailing-Storm awaits fleet on day one of global race

    ALICANTE, Spain, Oct 11 (Reuters) – A storm was lying in wait for the Volvo Ocean Race’s seven-strong fleet as the nine-month marathon offshore event was launched on Saturday.

    Race forecasters warned the 66 sailors taking part that heavy rain and strong winds would greet them on day one of the 36,739-mile voyage around the world that begins with an Atlantic crossing to Cape Town, via the Mediterranean, expected to take around three weeks.

    The warning evoked memories of the start of the last edition in 2011 when two boats were forced to quit on day one after suffering crippling damage during an electrical storm in the Mediterranean.

    This time a new one-design boat that is built for durability has been introduced for all the teams.

    A Dutch crew, Team Brunel, led by 51-year-old skipper Bouwe Bekking was the first to set sail from Alicante.

    They face opposition from teams from Spain, Abu Dhabi, the United States/Turkey, Denmark, China and Sweden.

    The latter, Team SCA, is the first all-women crew to contest the event in 12 years. (Editing by Tony Jimenez)


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    Fremac Marine Earns Outstanding Dealer Award

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    Fremac Marine Sales gsPictured from left are Brad Gates Nautic Global Chief Executive Officer; Fran D’Agata, Fremac Marine; and Mike O’Connell, Nautic Global Chief Operating Officer.

    (Bridgeport, NY – Oct. 2014) Nautic Global Group recognized top dealers from across the country at their Annual Dealer Meeting. With a theme of “Back to the Future” the event held at the Century Center, South Bend Indiana featured a business meeting, sales seminars, 2015 product review and awards banquet.

    Fremac Marine Sales was presented an outstanding dealer award as a national sales leader for the Nautic Global Group Godfrey Pontoon, Hurricane Deck Boat and Polar Kraft product lines for the 2014 model year.

    In making the presentation, Nautic Global Group CEO, Brad Gates commented, “Successful dealers learn from the past and incorporate that knowledge into their plans for the future. Fremac continues to build for the future by marketing NGG products with a superior level of sales and service. We are proud that they are a part of our national dealer family.”

    Fremac Marine is located at 1081 Route 31 in Bridgeport.

     

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    The biggest and best: 'Largest ever' U.S. Sailboat show cruises into town

    The internationally recognized United States Sailboat Show opened today in historic downtown Annapolis, filling Ego Alley and beyond with all types of beautiful new sailing vessels.

    Each year the U.S. Sailboat Show draws to Annapolis nearly 50,000 attendees and the world’s most prestigious sailboat manufacturers. Here you will find the newest luxury cruising yachts, sleek racing hulls, trailerable sailboats, and small sailing dinghies.

    For the first time, the show, which continues through Monday, includes previously owned boats in a separate section known as Brokerage Cove, located on the opposite side of the Spa Creek Bridge. In addition to the boats, the area around City Dock is filled with hundreds of exhibitor booths in which every type of sailing gear, nautical accessory, and marine service is on display.

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    Continued growth

    “The show continues to grow. This year, we’re expecting a huge number of monohulls and more than 50 catamarans, with boats ranging in size from 20 to 90 feet. In terms of the show’s square footage, this is our largest show ever,” said Paul Jacobs, president and general manager of U.S. Yacht Shows, producer of this and several other area boat shows.

    “(Brokerage Cove) is a dedicated area for high-quality, previously owned boats,” he said. “Following a terrific inaugural year introducing brokerage boats at the 2013 Powerboat Show, we began building additional floating docks for a similar section at the Sailboat Show.”

    To get to the brokerage boat docks, attendees have several options. They may take the water taxis, use the electric car shuttles provided by the show, cross Duke of Gloucester Street on foot, or get off on the first stop when riding the buses from the show’s offsite parking lot at the Navy stadium.

    After much publicity regarding the sale of U.S. Yacht Shows last year by then-owner C. Edward Hartman II, Jacobs emphasized that the new ownership group, led by Jacobs and comprised of five locals, continues Hartman’s commitment to the community.

    “Ed’s desire was that the show remain locally owned, and it is,” Jacobs said. “We have retained the same management team, from operations through sales and accounting. They’ve all remained in place.”

    This evening from 6 to 8:30 p.m., the show’s second annual Launch Party takes place at the Loews Annapolis Hotel. Ken Read, celebrated sailor and two-time U.S. Yachtsman of the Year, will speak on the state of the sailing industry and the Volvo Ocean Race. Also at tonight’s event, the first Sailing Industry Distinguished Service award will be presented. (Tickets to the party are sold out.)

    New boats

    The Annapolis Show, as many in the sailing industry know it, is a favorite venue for sailboat manufacturers from around the world to debut their newest boats. Expect to see more than a dozen new vessels, ranging from ocean-going cruisers, to built-for-speed racing hulls, to smaller, entry-level models.

    To find these newest boats, look for the blue and gold “USSS Premiering Boat” flags flying in their rigging. A sampling of the new models includes the CC 30 racing hull at Dock D, the Jeanneau Sun Fast 3600 at Dock F1, the Fountain Pajot Saba 50 Catamaran at Dock B, the Beneteau Oceanis 35 at Dock B, and the Dufour 560 at Dock F2.

    Forbes Horton, owner of Forbes Horton Yachts in Annapolis, has on display at Dock C two new X-Yacht boats. The boats, a 35-foot hull and a 38-foot hull, were delivered by freighter to Baltimore last month.

    “These boats are luxury, high quality performance cruisers built in Denmark,” said Horton. “We believe they will fill the niche between normal production boats and fully custom models.”

    Horton plans to build on his success at the 2013 Powerboat Show’s initial brokerage section.

    “In general, Brokerage Cove had good traffic, and we found that most of the attendees who came to the brokerage docks were pretty serious buyers who were taking advantage of the opportunity to view and compare many makes and models in a relatively small area,” he said. “We were pleased to sell a boat right out of the show.”

    This year, Forbes Horton Yachts is displaying a previously owned boat in the first-ever sailboat brokerage section, but it isn’t a sailboat. It’s a Selene 53 Trawler. Why? “Many cruising sailors are baby boomers who are going into powerboats because they’re not as physically demanding to operate,” Horton said. “In fact, every one of our Selene powerboat owners was once a sailor, so that’s the reason we’ll be showing this particular boat at the sail show.”

    Horton offered some advice for locals who aren’t sailors.

    “If you don’t own a boat, you don’t know what you’re missing,” he said. “We live in an area that has some of the best sailing in the world. This is a good place for beginners because we have small tides and the soft bottom of the Chesapeake Bay is forgiving of the inevitable navigational error. If the boat hits the bottom, you can generally just back up without doing damage.


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