Archive for » August, 2014 «

Sailing into the Future

 It’s another beautiful day on Lake Tahoe and Paul Brunk is off for his third trip onto the water. He never gets enough of the boating life. And while he doesn’t own a boat of his own, he is responsible for ten of the biggest boats on this famous lake.

“After ten years of working for the Tahoe City Marina and trying to help take care of the boats before and after work I decided to start my own business. I found the perfect niche with the owners of these big boats.”

He is a caretaker for them. He does all the things owners don’t really want to do.

“I keep them in tip top shape, mechanically,” he says. “I stock the galleys, change the sheets, pump the tanks, scrub them down and make sure they have a great time, every time they are here.”

Not only is he a caterer, a captain, a navigator and a lifeguard for them, he’s also a nanny who can change the oil, predict the weather and make anything they need happen.”

“I’ve never had to say no to any of my clients,” he tells me. “This client here,” he says pointing to a $1.3 million yacht. “He wanted a jet ski for the weekend. He called me last night, there it is loaded up and ready for the weekend.”

He calls his business Elite Boat Management and says at first he was afraid of not having enough clients, but at the end of his first summer he’s had to turn a a few away.

 “I want to give everyone I have the very best service possible. So for now I have enough. I may hire on a few more people but we’ll just have to wait and see.”

 He calls his work the “No Stress Express” and says sometimes he can’t believe that Lake Tahoe is his office…every day.

Written by Erin Breen


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Sailing: Rushworth triumphs in Silver Firefly

REVERED coach Andy Rushworth was the fitting winner as Christchurch Sailing Club’s Silver Firefly was contested for the first time in 27 years.

Sailing a borrowed Solo, Rushworth, affectionately known as Rover, had been seen out training on the course for several days in advance and clearly had taken the event seriously.

For the first time in recent memory, the club adopted a pursuit race format with the Avon Scow setting off first followed by a stream of Toppers, Splash, Lasers, Solo, Vision and Finns.

Early race-leader Stuart Percival made good use of the early fresh breeze in his Scow and held a good margin over the chasing fleet well into the race. Jack Acton (Topper) gave chase.

Starting last, the Finns of Simon Percival and Jack Arnell made short work of reigning in the Lasers of Mike Greenland, Richard Beasley, Glen Tizzard and Gary Mehson to emerge as the early favourites.

Starting just ahead of the Lasers, the RS Vision of Jim Lawrence and Jon Arnell made a good start but when their mainsail halyard snapped they were forced to retire.

Ela Miller (Splash) managed to overhaul the Topper of Jacqui Tizzard and moved into pole position as the leading lady helm.

Despite her best efforts, however, she was unable to resist the challenge of the Solo, Lasers and Finns in the final stages as the breeze died away.

Meanwhile, Rushworth set about chasing down the slower boats and by mid-race had emerged as the main threat to Stuart Percival.

With 20 minutes to go, Stuart Percival still held a sizeable lead as Rushworth moved past Acton’s Topper into second place as Arnell and Simon Percival steadily closed in.

But with less than six minutes remaining, Rushworth finally drew level and after a short luffing match was able to dive to leeward and take the lead before the two Finns took second and third on the final beat.

At the prize-giving, Rushworth thanked the race team who braved the wet weather and congratulated the hardy sailors who defied the forecast to make the race a huge success.

The Silver Firefly remains under lock and key in the trophy cabinet but a new winner for 2014 will be engraved to join her prestigious list of former champions.

Winners – First grand master: Andy Rushworth (Solo). First junior: Jack Arnell (Finn). First legend: Stuart Percival (Scow). First lady: Ela Miller (Splash).


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Conn. Community Rejects Yale Sailing Expansion

Yale formally withdrew a request to expand its sailing center this summer after members of the nearby Branford community of South Beach protested the plans.

The school had drawn up a proposal to expand the sailing center, which is used by both the Yale varsity sailing team and community members for sailing lessons, through the purchase of two properties across the street. With the expansion, Yale would have been able to construct a larger building to store more boats and house staff. But after a public hearing with around 200 residents from the area present, Yale attorney Joseph Hammer decided to cancel the request.

“The best course is to withdraw the present application,” Hammer stated at the end of a three-hour hearing held at a fire station in Branford. “We still think the property does present an opportunity to improve the yacht club without expanding the programs and without expanding the number of boats.”

When the plans were announced at a community meeting earlier this summer, the New Haven Register reported that so many citizens turned out that some had to listen outside through open windows and a fire marshal came to shut it down.

The Civic Association of South Beach is responsible for granting permits, and under the area’s zoning law, Yale University cannot build housing unless it obtains one.

South Beach residents had raised concerns that the expansion would increase congestion in the area and worried that the new structures would tower over existing homes.

At the last meeting, residents wore bright yellow stickers that all read “No Yale Expansion.”

Yale entered a sales contract to purchase the land — which is 20 minutes away from Old Campus by car — from the estate of property owner Barbara Davidson. Property co-owner Elizabeth Bailey was the only community member to express support for the plans at the meeting on July 14, according to the Register. The rest of the residents hired a lawyer to represent opposition to Yale’s plans, who reportedly said the university’s application was “insufficient.”

According to the same Register article, residents also worried that expanding the center would lead to more unruly behavior by Yale students, with one woman complaining that she had seen students having sex outside the boathouse and a student had insulted her husband.

“If Yale has outgrown their facilities, then I say they have outgrown our neighborhood,” added resident Clarice Begemann at the meeting.

But Zach Leonard, head varsity sailing coach, said he thought the sailing team has a mostly positive relationship with the local community. Leonard believes “old stories” about the team have continued to circulate among neighbors.

He said expansion would have created more parking, allowing more community members to participate in the club’s sailing offerings.

“We’re always trying to find ways to improve our operations here and [the expansion plans were] part of that,” Leonard said. “It’s been a twenty year process and we’ve got to keep working at it.”

Sailing team member Megan Valentine ’16 said that while she had been excited by expansion plans, the existing facility meets the team’s needs. Valentine said she did not think the withdrawal of plans would compromise the team’s training or morale.

She disagreed, however, with residents’ characterization of Yale’s relationship with Short Beach. Valentine lived in New Haven last summer and occasionally attended Tuesday evening regattas open to the community. She noted that the facility also provides summer sailing lessons.

“For the most part, we got along really well,” Valentine said.

The Yale sailing team has trained at the Branford facility since 1953.


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Cantiere Delle Marche & Denison Yacht Sales Join F…

“There is no doubt about the need for Cantiere delle Marche to have someone who transfers our values, mission and vision on a daily basis in the US market,” explains Vasco Buonpensiere, Sales and Marketing Director of Cantiere delle Marche. “The combined knowledge, experience and enthusiasm of Alex together with Bob Denison is a sure formula to make things happen in the United States. This wouldn’t have been possible without such an experienced and proactive partner.”

The award-winning Italian shipyard, which – in three and a half years – has outperformed all his competitors with its two explorer ranges of yachts (Darwin Class and Nauta Air), will bring two of the seven boats under to the 2015 American boat shows; including Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

Alex G. Clarke confirms the positive energy which surrounds this new co-operation between CdM and Denison Yacht Sales. “The appointment of Denison Superyacht Division as the exclusive North American representative for Cantiere delle Marche is the culmination of over five years of building relationships with the CEO Ennio Cecchini who I consider a personal friend, as well as Naval Architect Sergio Cutolo who is responsible for the highly successful Darwin line of yachts, and of course Vasco Buonpensiere who I feel is the heart soul of the shipyard. American buyers have pioneered the explorer style vessels, and I am confident that the Cantiere delle Marche brand will be a huge success in the USA and we are honoured to be a part of building this great future with CdM.”

Bob Denison, founder and President of DYS strongly believes in the success of CdM in the North American Market and declares: “The Denison team is thrilled to be representing CdM in North America. As a grandson, a nephew, and a son of aluminium boat builders here in the U.S., this product is very special to me personally. I strongly believe in the CdM can’t wait to introduce the American market to the product.”

Gabriele Virgili, Chairman of Cantiere delle Marche, confirms: “Alex’s approach to our products and our shipyard is unbelievable; it is like he has been part of our organisation since the beginning. His commitment towards the clients, his professionalism and precision when it comes to the most delicate stages of the negotiations are really commendable. I am sure that we will soon move up from our one-sale-every-90-days average performance thanks to this partnership.”

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Boat Expo returns to FirstEnergy Park

The Jersey Shore Boat Sale Expo will return to FirstEnergy Park, home of the Lakewood BlueClaws, from Sept. 19 to 21.

Now in its sixth year and organized by the Marine Trades Association of New Jersey (MTA/NJ), this unique outdoor boat show has grown steadily in popularity since it began in 2009.

The Expo offers a long list of local dealers, each displaying a wide selection of the industry’s top brands. This year’s show will feature more dealers and more boats than ever before, plus a wide array of marine merchandise and services.

“I’m very optimistic about the show,” said Fred Brueggemann, president of the MTA/NJ. “The show has doubled in size since we began.”

Brueggemann, who is also, the owner of Key Harbor Marine and Statewide Marine Services said there’s been an uptick in boats sales and the amount of fuel sales, which is always a good indicator of a healthy boating environment.

While there is still a lot of work to do following Hurricane Sandy, Brueggemann believes the boating industry is on the mend and should experience steady growth over the next couple of years.

Chip Gahr, owner of Comstock Yacht Sales and Marina in Brick said the Expo has definitely created sales for him and he’s participated since the beginning.

“For one thing, it’s very affordable. For a small amount of money, you get a lot of space,” he said. And, he added, since it’s a fall show, there are a lot of good opportunities for buyers.

“Manufacturers are offering rebates and promos, so there are a lot of good deals out there,” he said.

Comstock will bring eight to 10 boats, including Regulator, Formula and HydraSports, which Gahr said amounts to about $1.5 million in inventory.

In addition to newly introduced 2015 models, there will be a number of new 2014 boats on sale, plus an entire area devoted to previously owned boats offered at special prices for those in search of a bargain.

Shoppers will be able to climb aboard all types of boats, from family cruisers, express sport boats, center consoles, canyon runners, ski and pontoon boats, canoes, and kayaks to personal watercraft.

“This is going to be our biggest one yet,” said Melissa Danko, executive director of the MTA/NJ. “We’re looking to reconfigure the Expo in the larger parking lots to accommodate the increase in dealers and boats.” Danko said she expects 300 boats will be on display.

The MTA/NJ estimates that boats from 60 different major and regional manufacturers will be exhibiting, while a boater’s marketplace will offer attractive deals on gear, accessories, marine equipment and services.

Also on hand will be representatives from a number of local marinas to answer question about services, storage, and the many boating opportunities that exist on New Jersey’s rivers, bays, lakes and in coastal areas.

The Expo includes plenty of attractions for young mariners as well with displays and activities in the popular Kids Cove, sponsored by the Lakewood BlueClaws and the New Jersey Sea Grant Consortium.

Since its inception, the aim of the Expo has been to create an affordable and accessible venue where boat sellers and boat buyers could come together. Very simply, the goal has been to sell boats.

“Late summer and early fall is ample time to still get on the water and enjoy your boat,” said Danko. “The fishing is good and many warm days are ahead before the leaves begin to turn.”

Admission to the Expo is $4. Children under 12 get in free when accompanied by an adult. In addition to the great selection of new and used boats, the Expo offers plenty of family fun.

As always, parking in the spacious lot is free.

The Expo opens on Friday, Sept. 19 at 11 am. and closes at 6. On Saturday, the show open at 10 a.m and closes at 6 and opens again on Sunday at 10 a.m and closes at 5 p.m.

For more information regarding the Jersey Shore Boat Sale Expo, visit JerseyBoatExpo.com, call 732-292-1051; Fax: 732-292-1041 or email: info@jerseyboatexpo.com.

If you are interested in exhibiting at the Expo, contact the MTA/NJ office at 732-292-1051; email atinfo@jerseyboatexpo.com; or visit JerseyBoatExpo.com for an application.

All proceeds from the event return to the MTA/NJ to support its efforts to promote, advance, and protect the recreational boating industry in New Jersey.

John Oswald: joswald@app.com


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Sailor Surge for Holmes Hole This Summer

The big story to come out of the Holmes Hole Sailing Association’s summer series of racing is the growing number of boats that are turning up at the starting line each week. Last week was a perfect example with 20 boats competing on Thursday and 17 entrants heading out for the Sunday race to Chappaquiddick.

Northeast winds up to 15 mph and more set the racers off to Chappy on a short beat to get around Can 23a, then falling off for a reach to the Red Nun 4 at the entrance to the outer harbor at Edgartown. Another beat northeast to Can 3 was followed by a dead-downwind run to the finish.

There were lots of interesting possibilities for success, but the A Division Alerion 28s found the course and wind speed most to their liking. Jim Dixon captured his first win of the season on At Last followed by season leader Mo Flam aboard Penelope. Stuart Halpert grabbed third on Providence, making it a trio of Alerions at the top.

Guest boat Rascal, a CC 40 sailed by Charlie Burckmyer of Edgartown, joined the fray, continuing the outreach to include boats outside of Vineyard Haven.

In the B Division, Bow Van Riper got his Vineyard 15 Tyche moving briskly to take the blue ribbon by nearly three minutes over Woody Bowman in Wonder, a Gannon Benjamin Tern (yawl). Third place went to David McDonough who single-handed his CC 37 Trinity to yet another in-the-money finish.

The rising tide of competitors makes for a crammed starting line and close finishes and Thursday evening’s race with 20 boats put skippers to the test. Dying northeast wind made for some nervousness in the back half of the fleet, but everyone finished the loop around the harbor buoys before the light left the harbor.

The earlier setting sun, while creating a dazzling light show for racers, is a bittersweet reminder that the days, and the sailing season, are getting shorter.

Sunday, August 31, is the final racing day for the summer series with starts at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

This year’s Moffett Race will be held on Saturday, Sept. 6. Sign up at regattanetwork.com.


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Cantiere Delle Marche Appoints Denison Yacht Sales Exc…

“There is no doubt about the need for Cantiere delle Marche to have someone who transfers our values, mission and vision on a daily basis in the US market,” explains Vasco Buonpensiere, Sales and Marketing Director of Cantiere delle Marche. “The combined knowledge, experience and enthusiasm of Alex together with Bob Denison is a sure formula to make things happen in the United States. This wouldn’t have been possible without such an experienced and proactive partner.”

The award-winning Italian shipyard, which – in three and a half years – has outperformed all his competitors with its two explorer ranges of yachts (Darwin Class and Nauta Air), will bring two of the seven boats under to the 2015 American boat shows; including Miami and Fort Lauderdale.

Alex G. Clarke confirms the positive energy which surrounds this new co-operation between CdM and Denison Yacht Sales. “The appointment of Denison Superyacht Division as the exclusive North American representative for Cantiere delle Marche is the culmination of over five years of building relationships with the CEO Ennio Cecchini who I consider a personal friend, as well as Naval Architect Sergio Cutolo who is responsible for the highly successful Darwin line of yachts, and of course Vasco Buonpensiere who I feel is the heart soul of the shipyard. American buyers have pioneered the explorer style vessels, and I am confident that the Cantiere delle Marche brand will be a huge success in the USA and we are honoured to be a part of building this great future with CdM.”

Bob Denison, founder and President of DYS strongly believes in the success of CdM in the North American Market and declares: “The Denison team is thrilled to be representing CdM in North America. As a grandson, a nephew, and a son of aluminium boat builders here in the U.S., this product is very special to me personally. I strongly believe in the CdM can’t wait to introduce the American market to the product.”

Gabriele Virgili, Chairman of Cantiere delle Marche, confirms: “Alex’s approach to our products and our shipyard is unbelievable; it is like he has been part of our organisation since the beginning. His commitment towards the clients, his professionalism and precision when it comes to the most delicate stages of the negotiations are really commendable. I am sure that we will soon move up from our one-sale-every-90-days average performance thanks to this partnership.”

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Afloat: Francis and Male seal Castle Cove Cup

THRIVING IN THE WILD CONDITIONS: Kevin Francis and Phil Male



First published


in Afloat News





by Emma Stevenson, Afloat

MORE than 15 boats made their way out into Portland Harbour for the Castle Cove Sailing Club Cup.

Bringing with it very windy and gusty conditions, the course had upwind legs, challenging downwind legs and good reaches.

Kevin Francis and Phil Male, on their Osprey, thrived in the wild conditions as they achieved a second and two firsts, to win the cup by just one point.

The youth sailors also made the most of the hard conditions and were well represented.

Cadet Emma Bishop (CCSC), who won the slow handicap class at the Wey-mouth Regatta, was out again completing all three races and finishing a very respectable third place in her Laser 4.7.

Also out was Weymouth Sailing Club cadet Alexandra Stevenson, 14, on her Laser Radial who retired early as she was finding the conditions quite challenging.

Stevenson thought it was prudent to complete the sail back to Weymouth before the conditions worsened.

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Fact Check: Did Tillis give tax breaks to yacht owners?

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— One of the most common digs Democratic-allied groups are taking at state House Speaker Thom Tillis in his U.S. Senate campaign involves a tax break on boats and planes. 

Tillis, a Republican, is running to unseat first-term Democratic Sen. Kay Hagan. North Carolina’s U.S. Senate campaign is already the subject of millions of dollars in television spending by non-candidate groups on both sides of the political divide. 

Democrats have been working hard to paint Tillis as an advocate for legislation that favors the wealthy over ordinary North Carolinians, and this “yachts and jets” claims fits right in with that message. 

A recent Senate Majority PAC ad, for example, criticizes Tillis for how the GOP-led General Assembly dealt with education funding and then adds, “Meanwhile, Tillis gives tax breaks for yacht and private jet owners.”

The most colorful ad playing on the claim this summer is also by is also by Senate Majority PAC. It features a teacher leading a troop of schoolchildren to a marina, where they ask to use a boat since the school’s classrooms are too crowded. In the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee’s latest ad, an obviously well-heeled young woman carrying a large red purse and trailed by two security goons boards a private plane as the anchor says that Tillis has been “giving tax breaks to yacht and jet owners.” 

While it’s certainly attention-grabbing, this ocean-going tale has a few leaks.

BACKGROUND: North Carolina has capped the sales tax paid on airplanes since 1957 and on boats since 1967, according to the state Department of Revenue’s most recent “Tax Expenditure Report.” Currently, both boats and aircraft are taxed at 3 percent of their purchase price, up to a cap of $1,500. For the buyer of a $1 million vessel, that means a break of $28,500 of the $30,000 they would have paid if there were not cap. 

In 2013, the General Assembly authored a tax reform package aimed at lowering rates residents pay on income and other taxes while eliminating tax breaks for many items. For example, the tax on a ticket for a movie or minor league baseball game used to be capped, but it is not any longer. Lawmakers also did things such as eliminate sales tax holidays. 

The 2013 tax reform bill neither raised nor lowered the cap on the sales tax charged for boats and planes. But the case made by those using the yachts and jets claims is that, by failing to get rid of the loophole in the 2013 tax reform bill, the General Assembly generally, and Tillis in particular, is responsible for keeping it.  

WHY NO CHANGE: “It was just one of those pieces we didn’t get to,” Rep. Julia Howard, R-Davie, said of the boats and planes sales tax exemption. “Nobody said don’t look at this or don’t look at that.” 

Howard was one of the lead authors of tax reform legislation in the House and called the 2013 bill “a big lift” that couldn’t get to everything. 

Going into 2013, legislative leaders knew that a promised broad-based tax reform would be difficult to deliver because any number of constituencies would try to defend existing tax loopholes against closing. 

Of the plans put forward, the most far-reaching may have been Sen. Bob Rucho’s effort to drop the top state income tax rate to 4.5 percent by relying heavily on sales tax. At one point during the reform effort, Rucho, R-Mecklenburg, publicly broke with members of his own chamber because they backed off the push toward a consumption-based model that relied heavily on sales taxes.

Interviewed this week, Rucho said there are a number of loopholes that the 2013 legislation didn’t close, but both he and Howard said another tax reform package would be put together in 2015.

“That will be in our next phase as we continue to lower the personal income tax rate,” Rucho said of the plane and boat exemption. 

Despite being critical of House leaders and the governor during the 2013 tax reform effort, Rucho declined to pin the yacht and jet exemption on Tillis.

“To say that Tillis did that is totally wrong,” he said.

MORE CONTEXT: The tax cap for boats and planes is similar to the tax break given to those buying cars and pickup trucks in the state. 

A 1989 law exempts personal automobiles for the state sales tax rate of 4.5 percent and instead imposes a “Highway Use Tax” of 3 percent for most vehicles. That exemption will cost the state an estimated $517.4 million during the fiscal year that started July 1. 

By comparison, the boats and plans exemption will cost the state $16.2 million over the same time period, according to the Department of Revenue

The difference, of course, is that far more residents are buying new and used cars to get to work and take their children to school every day than million-dollar boats or multimillion-dollar Cessna Citation jets. 

MAKING THEIR CASES: “As Speaker of the House, Thom Tillis had the ability to overhaul the tax system in any way he saw fit, and he could have put everything on the table,” said Ty Matsdorf of Senate Majority PAC. “He could have demanded a deal that closed loopholes to pay for things like more teachers. Instead, he continued to give yacht and jet owners a break. Just because these tax breaks had been in place before doesn’t mean that they had to be continued under Tillis. Tills had the ability, and chance, to end them.”

Tillis’ campaign, of course, has a different take. 

“This is yet another completely meritless and incredibly hypocritical attack against Thom from Kay Hagan’s liberal special interest allies,” said Tillis spokesman Daniel Keylin, who points out that Hagan served as a high-ranking lawmaker while the tax break was in place.

“They conveniently neglect to mention that, as chief budget writer, Hagan retained the cap at the same time she was busy raising taxes on middle-class North Carolina families,” Keylin continued. 

Fact Check RedTHE CALL: Where this claim falls on WRAL’s fact-checking scale depends whether you take the view that failing to act against a loophole counts as endorsing that particular action, or whether the suggestion that Tillis “GAVE” a tax break misleads voters who might not know the particulars behind this tax. In order to make this call, your fact-checker put this question to six other seasoned journalists on the WRAL News team. 

Two members of our panel took the view that, if the legislature was in the business of reforming the entire tax code, it’s not misleading to suggest there was an opportunity to take up the yachts and jets loophole. This viewpoint empathizes with the notion that those buying planes and boats are purchasing something beyond basic transportation and might well be able to chip in more toward education, which is the case made in the commercials. 

But stronger sentiments were put forward that Democrats are trying to say Tillis, or at least the legislature that he led, did something that he did not do. This view holds that one cannot give a tax break that somebody already has had for more than 20 years. In other words, if this conversation were happening outside of a political context, it would clearly be wrong to say that Tillis or the General Assembly “gave” the tax break in 2013. Also lacking is any evidence that Tillis personally advocated one way or the other on this particular tax break. 

Due to the leaky logic behind the yachts and jets claim, we give it a red light.


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Isle of Sheppey Sailing Club's Round the Island Race 2014

Sailors from across the UK are preparing to take part in the longest dinghy and board race in Europe, held right here in Kent.

Isle of Sheppey Round-the-Island race 2013

Isle of Sheppey Round-the-Island race 2013

The Isle of Sheppey Sailing Club’s Round the Island Race will take place this Saturday, August 30.

It’s the 56th event and is likely to attract enthusiasts from across the country.

Club commodore Tim Harris says traditionally it’s been more sailing dinghies and catamarans which take part, but recently it has diversified with windsurfers and paddle-boarders joining.

There will even be one competitor braving the waters in a kayak with a sail attached to the back, for the first time ever.

“We have had quite a lot of interest from paddle-boarders this year and rowing clubs including Queenborough,” he said.

Club members have in the past welcomed in the region of 300 boats, but the numbers really depend on the weather forecast. They would be happy with 100 plus entries this time as it’s an important source of income for the club.

Isle of Sheppey Round-the-Island race 2013

Isle of Sheppey Round-the-Island race 2013

Best places from which to watch the action include the Kingsferry Bridge, Harty, the Minster Leas, Leysdown and Shellness.

“The Kingsferry Bridge is where you get the most excitement with people turning the boats over – there’s often a bit of drama there,” Mr Harris said.

Registration, which costs £25 in advance or £30 on the day, opens at 7am.

There are four different starts to the 40-mile race, which is worked out on handicap, and a separate one for the paddle-boarders. Slower boats start at 10.30am; medium speed at 11am; fast dinghy, mono-hulls and slower catamarans at 11.30am and faster catamarans at midday.

It all starts and finishes at the club in Marine Parade, Sheerness, where there will also be a burger wagon and refreshments.

Visit www.iossc.co.uk or email info@iossc.co.uk


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