Archive for » May 16th, 2014«

Boat sales show solid gains in April

Posted on May 16th, 2014
Written by Jack Atzinger


Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Recreational boat sales growth in March amounted to just a trickle, but the solid single-digit increases the industry saw in April suggest that builders and dealers could enjoy sustainable gains in the warmer months ahead.

Sales in the industry’s main powerboat segments rose 5 percent to 10,973 and industrywide sales climbed 8.9 percent to 17,061 from the same month a year earlier in 30 early reporting states that represent about 64 percent of the U.S. boat market, Statistical Surveys reported today.

“I think this is the start of a good swing and the momentum we needed, and all we need now is some good spring weather to kick the boating season into full gear,” Statistical Surveys national marine sales manager Ryan Kloppe said.

Among the high-volume categories, the 11- to 40-foot outboard segment stood out. Sales there rose 11.3 percent, or 377 boats, to 3,703, and they are up 6.6 percent for the year through April at 10,692 in the early-reporting states.

Kloppe said boats in that segment are versatile and come with a range of pricing options.

“I think that’s going to be the hot category this year,” he said.

Sales of aluminum fishing boats managed a gain of 4.2 percent, or 133 boats, to 3,292, but the aluminum pontoon category was nearly flat, slipping by seven boats to 2,611. Kloppe said that when the rest of the states report their April sales the results in those two groups should improve.

Sales rose in categories that embraced the largest and smallest boats on the market.

Bigger-boat segments had double-digit gains. The 31- to 40-foot cruiser category saw a 25-boat increase, or 20.5 percent, to 147; the 41- to 62-foot yacht segment had a gain of 18 boats, or 22.2 percent, to 99; and the 63- to 99-foot custom and semicustom yacht segment showed an increase of 10 boats, or 40 percent, to 35.

The Coast Guard was up to date in its reports of documented vessels, giving a complete picture of sales in the bigger-boat categories.

Among the smaller-boat categories, sales of ski boats climbed 24.4 percent, or 114, to 582; sales of jetboats rose 10.2 percent, or 29, to 314; and sales of personal watercraft jumped 28 percent, or 631 units, to 2,886.

Sales were higher in eight of the top 10 states than they were in the same month last year.

Florida led with 2,671 sales, up 25.5 percent. Texas had 2,227, up 6.1 percent, and Michigan reported 1,518, up 9.4 percent.

Sales in North Carolina were up 6.6 percent at 1,040 and they were up 44.8 percent in Georgia at 889.

Rounding out the top 10, sales were down 6.8 percent in New York at 889; up 13.1 percent in Tennessee at 744; up 10.2 percent in Arizona at 670; down 13.3 percent in Ohio at 587; and up 15.6 percent in California at 571.

Sales were higher in 21 of the early reporting states in April.

Sailboat sales fell 7.7 percent, or 18 boats, to 216.


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Author Discusses Kennedy Family’s Tradition Of Sailing The Victura

The source of this photo is uncertain but it appears to be an unpublished photo by David Drew Zingg taken for Sports Illustrated in 1960. (Courtesy University Press of New England)

(Courtesy University Press of New England)

BOSTON — Ever since the opening of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in 1979, the Kennedy family sailboat Victura returns each May, remaining on display through the summer and fall.

The crew from Crosby Yacht Yard in Osterville, where the boat is stored each winter, erects the 25-foot wooden sloop on a stretch of grass facing the Boston Harbor, careful to set the boat on a tilt, as if it were sailing into the wind.

In his new book, “Victura: The Kennedys, A Sailboat, And The Sea,” author James Graham dives into the Kennedy family’s relationship with sailing, and the role this handcrafted sailboat plays in their legacy.

“You know, I look at [the Victura] and I see brothers and sisters and cousins having fun together, learning to sail together, passing that heritage down from one to the next, and I just see a family,” Graham told WBUR.

Here are highlights from Graham’s interview with Morning Edition host Bob Oakes:

On the Kennedy family sailing heritage

One aspect of the story I tell is the fostering and development of the Kennedy brand and it really started as early as the mid-1930s, when Joe Kennedy was just emerging as a political figure and invited news media to come and photograph his children on sailboats. Even the 1934 Boston Globe had a photo of Jack and Bobby on the bow of the Victura. And of course, that famous photo in 1953 on the cover of LIFE magazine with a young Sen. Jack Kennedy and his fiance, Jacqueline. That boat is so inextricably tied to the family image.

Photo used as LIFE magazine cover for the week of July 20, 1953 featuring then-Sen. John F. Kennedy with then-fiancée Jacqueline Bouvier. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

On John F. Kennedy’s relationship with sailing

There are numerous little doodles that he drew of sailboats and sailboats that look just like the Victura. Even the evening before he died in Texas he left a doodle of a sailboat in his hotel room.

A presidential doodle during the days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. From Victura, photo courtesy of JFK Library, ca. 1962. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

A presidential doodle during the days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

That image, it’s a touching aspect of the life of John F. Kennedy that even in these trying times, like the Cuban missile crisis, you’d see doodles of a sailboat as though he were trying to mentally transport himself away from the trouble of the day, back to the joys of sailing and the sea.

On the love of sail races

Coming in second was never good enough. And there is kind of a constant theme throughout their lives, stories of coming from behind. And that really, I think, was a life lesson for them. They learned from sailing that you could be several lengths behind in a race and still catch up and win a race. Certainly in politics, that’s a valuable lesson to learn early.

On Ted Kennedy’s love of the Victura

He loved sailing it from his own childhood. There’s a story of his older brother Joe Junior sailing with him when Ted was very young. Joe was frustrated with Teddy’s lack of knowledge of sailing and picked him up and threw him in the water. And then Joe Junior jumped in after him and retrieved him. But despite that early experience, he loved the sport.

After John and Robert Kennedy died, Ted certainly must have felt that sailing the Victura and other boats was a great way to reconnect with his nephews and nieces who were then fatherless. I think Ted, too, particularly after his brother Robert was assassinated, easy to imagine how shocking that moment must have been, and to just collect his thoughts he would go off and sail at night by himself. And I think that even when you’re the president or you’re a senator, like Ted Kennedy was, and tragic incidences occur, that going out to sea helps put it all back into perspective.


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Analyst weighs in on recent boat sales

Posted on May 16th, 2014
Written by Reagan Haynes


Increasing sales demonstrated by numbers released by Statistical Surveys today show that there is pent-up demand in boat sales.

Improved weather provided a modest April recovery and the benefit is expected to extend through the second quarter, Wells Fargo analyst Tim Conder wrote.

Sales of fiberglass outboard boats from 11 to 40 feet increased 11.3 percent and sales of aluminum pontoons decreased 0.3 percent.

Weather materially affected first-quarter retail sales — which are typically seasonally slow — with some manufacturers holding shipments to reduce channel inventory build, Conder wrote.

“Industry fundamentals remain sound, in our view, with clean channel inventories and new/used market dynamics lifting new unit sales,” Conder wrote. “We reiterate our full-year U.S. industry unit sales estimate of +8-9 percent in the traditional powerboat segment. Non-traditional segments of ski/wake boats and PWC will likely enjoy low double-digit growth.”

Brunswick’s first-quarter results showed noticeable weather impact and Wells Fargo expects the company to regain lost business during the second and third quarters.

“We believe management is indifferent to the rotation away from midsize sterndrive boats to aluminum and fiberglass boats as long as a Mercury engine is attached,” Conder wrote. “Mercury is Brunswick’s largest and most profitable business.”

Inboard fiberglass units increased 13.8 percent at Brunswick in April and sterndrive sales declined 0.8 percent.

Malibu Boats lost some market share throughout March, but the overall segment outperformed at retail, with units up 24.4 percent in April and 19.7 percent for the year to date.

The share loss also occurred during a quarter that accounts for less than 13.7 percent of annual volume and “excluded a few key MBUU states,” Conder wrote. “Management confirmed stronger April retail trends, with Europe and Australia also contributing.”

Wells Fargo analysts predict Malibu will capture adjacent market share to continue outperforming the segment.

Conder also predicts that BRP’s entry-level Spark PWC will be a catalyst for industry growth after a 14-year decline. PWC sales gained momentum, with units up 28 percent in April and 20.7 percent for the year to date.

“Existing product pricing had been cost-prohibitive to trial consumers,” Conder wrote. “The Spark should also help Sea-Doo’s entry into target developing markets. Evinrude is benefiting from strong outboard boat trends, but has underperformed modestly as engine sales for new boats outpace the repower business, where Evinrude is concentrated.”


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Author Discusses Kennedy Family’s Tradition Of Sailing The ‘Victura’

The source of this photo is uncertain but it appears to be an unpublished photo by David Drew Zingg taken for Sports Illustrated in 1960. (Courtesy University Press of New England)

(Courtesy University Press of New England)

BOSTON — Ever since the opening of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in 1979, the Kennedy family sailboat Victura returns each May, remaining on display through the summer and fall.

The crew from Crosby Yacht Yard in Osterville, where the boat is stored each winter, erects the 25-foot wooden sloop on a stretch of grass facing the Boston Harbor, careful to set the boat on a tilt, as if it were sailing into the wind.

In his new book, “Victura: The Kennedys, A Sailboat, And The Sea,” author James Graham dives into the Kennedy family’s relationship with sailing, and the role this handcrafted sailboat plays in their legacy.

“You know, I look at [the Victura] and I see brothers and sisters and cousins having fun together, learning to sail together, passing that heritage down from one to the next, and I just see a family,” Graham told WBUR.

Here are highlights from Graham’s interview with Morning Edition host Bob Oakes:

On the Kennedy family sailing heritage

One aspect of the story I tell is the fostering and development of the Kennedy brand and it really started as early as the mid-1930s, when Joe Kennedy was just emerging as a political figure and invited news media to come and photograph his children on sailboats. Even the 1934 Boston Globe had a photo of Jack and Bobby on the bow of the Victura. And of course, that famous photo in 1953 on the cover of LIFE magazine with a young Sen. Jack Kennedy and his fiance, Jacqueline. That boat is so inextricably tied to the family image.

Photo used as LIFE magazine cover for the week of July 20, 1953 featuring Senator John F. Kennedy with then-fiancée Jacqueline Bouvier. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

On John F. Kennedy’s relationship with sailing

There are numerous little doodles that he drew of sailboats and sailboats that look just like the Victura. Even the evening before he died in Texas he left a doodle of a sailboat in his hotel room.

A presidential doodle during the days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. From Victura, photo courtesy of JFK Library, ca. 1962. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

A presidential doodle during the days of the Cuban Missile Crisis. From Victura, photo courtesy of JFK Library, ca. 1962. (Courtesy of University Press of New England)

That image, it’s a touching aspect of the life of John F. Kennedy that even in these trying times, like the Cuban missile crisis, you’d see doodles of a sailboat as though he were trying to mentally transport himself away from the trouble of the day, back to the joys of sailing and the sea.

On the love of sail races

Coming in second was never good enough. And there is kind of a constant theme throughout their lives, stories of coming from behind. And that really, I think, was a life lesson for them. They learned from sailing that you could be several lengths behind in a race and still catch up and win a race. Certainly in politics, that’s a valuable lesson to learn early.

On Ted Kennedy’s love of the Victura

He loved sailing it from his own childhood. There’s a story of his older brother Joe Junior sailing with him when Ted was very young. Joe was frustrated with Teddy’s lack of knowledge of sailing and picked him up and threw him in the water. And then Joe Junior jumped in after him and retrieved him. But despite that early experience, he loved the sport.

After John and Robert Kennedy died, Ted certainly must have felt that sailing the Victura and other boats was a great way to reconnect with his nephews and nieces who were then, uh, fatherless. I think Ted, too, particularly after his brother Robert was assassinated, easy to imagine how shocking that moment must have been, and to just collect his thoughts he would go off and sail at night by himself. And I think that even when you’re the president or you’re a senator, like Ted Kennedy was, and tragic incidences occur, that going out to sea helps put it all back into perspective.


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Ferretti Group America Selects The Boat Village to Use Across All Brands

International Manufacturer Will Use Mobile Technology to Simplify Ownership — From the Day an Owner Takes Delivery of Their Yacht

HOBE SOUND, FL — (Marketwired) — 05/15/14 — Ferretti Group, the international builder that has crafted fine yachts for almost half a century under brands like Ferretti, Pershing, Mochi and Riva, has joined My-Villages regional and national rollout of its boat management tool to simplify ownership of new Ferretti Group vessels in the Americas.

Each new vessel will receive a digital profile that will be created with digitized equipment manuals of all onboard equipment, operating instructions, how-to videos and a customized maintenance schedule with automatic reminders.

Owners will be able to access all of this and more — including model-specific updates from the company, or information from a marina manager or other professional — from any computer, smartphone or tablet, anywhere in the world. The Boat Village also maintains records of the boat’s service history, usage trends, trip logs and other useful information electronically so that they are readily available anytime, anywhere.

“Ferretti builds exquisite yachts and we are excited to be a part of that,” said Kevin Hutchinson, founder and CEO of My-Villages, which created The Boat Village. “Our goal is to provide a modern-day solution that helps owners care for these fine yachts in a way that is both elegant and simple to use, and The Boat Village does exactly that.”

“Throughout our history, Ferretti Group has been innovating and acquiring new capabilities,” said Dave Granstaff, Ferretti Group America After Sales Manager. “Our integration of The Boat Village into our processes continues that rich tradition. Our commitment to customers does not end with delivery, and the use of The Boat Village will help us provide extraordinary service even after a customer leaves our port.”

Ferretti joins a growing list of major marine firms that have signed on with My-Villages to promote online support and boat management, both regionally and nationally. They include boat builders like The Hinckley Company and Regal, as well as brokerages like Bradford Marine, and Galati Yacht Sales, dealers like FastBoats, marinas like Aqua Marine Partners and Old Port Cove and service yards like Whiticar Boat Works and Marine Professionals Incorporated (MPI), to name a few.

About My-Villages
My-Villages is a technology company dedicated to helping people better maintain and operate the things they own. The company improves communication and coordination between product owners, manufacturers and industry service professionals, using mobile technology to simplify life for consumers and help businesses engage customers more effectively. Learn more at www.my-villages.com.

Media Contact:
Tammy Lewis
Chief Marketing Officer
My-Villages
+1.914.400.4376
Email Contact


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Sailing: Taster day at Highcliffe

Sailing: Taster day at Highcliffe

By Andy Mitchell

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HIGHCLIFFE Sailing Club is inviting prospective sailors of all ages and abilities to join in the fun at a taster day tomorrow.

May is National Watersports Month and the Mudeford Quay-based club are hoping to get dozens of people out on the water during the Royal Yachting Association’s (RYA) Push the Boat Out weekend.

It marks the third year of the RYA’s quest to generate greater interest and participation in sailing across the country with a host of coastal and inland clubs taking part.

Starting at 10am, Highcliffe hope to showcase their facilities with a tour of the clubhouse as well as introducing the public to several categories of boats including Lasers, Solos, Mirrors, Wayfarers, Picos, Oppis, Phantoms and RS’s. There will be a chance to talk to members about the boats sailing Christchurch Bay and the harbour.

More information can be found on the club’s website at www.highcliffesailing.co.uk or by phoning 07791 767116.

Details of the RYA initiative can be found on club’s website at www.rya.org.uk/go/ptbo

  • Jasmin Summers may have missed out on a clean sweep in the fourth and final round of Royal Lymington Yacht Club’s Monday Evening Dinghy Series but still took the overall Optimist honours.

Having finished first in each of the three previous races, Summers, who was on board Whirl Wind, came in second to Tom Mitchell’s No Idea.

The victory saw Mitchell leapfrog Alexandra Paton (Forget Me Knot), who finished third out of five competitors in the last race, in the final standings.

Monday Evening Series results: 1 Jasmin Summers (Whirl Wind), 2 Tom Mitchell (No Idea), 3 Alexandra Paton (Forget Me Knot).

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