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Sailing: Perry's joy is short-lived

Sailing: Perry’s joy is short-lived

By Andy Mitchell

Sailing: Perry’s joy is short-lived

TEENAGER Jamie Perry’s celebrations were cut short in Highcliffe Sailing Club’s Harbour Spring Points Series having been disqualified for twice missing a buoy.

Having set the pace in race five, Perry’s Laser 4.7 skipped the fourth marker with the oblivious field following suit.

Unsurprisingly, the opening lap was completed in record time but race officer allowed it to stand. However, with Perry rejoicing at the prospect of finishing first, he repeated his error while his fellow competitors adjusted their course, resulting in the youngster’s omission from the final reckoning.

David Burrows (Laser Radial) subsequently established a solid lead and was followed home by Josh McCormick (Laser Radial) and Kate Jardine (Laser 4.7).

Increased winds saw five boats, including the disqualified Perry, dropping out of race six as the sea sailors dominated.

McCormick secured the victory ahead of Peter Emerson (Laser Radial) and Burrows.

Mark Sharman (Laser Radial), who finished sixth in race five, kept top spot ahead of the final two races this Sunday (1.30pm start).

Ian Pike and Sally Perry (Comet Duo) are second with Jonathan Parsons (Solo) third.

  • Christchurch Sailing Club’s fleet of Scows kicked off their season with a four-day series over Easter with Graham Fairbrass just edging out Brian Crocker to take the top prize.

With some 70 boats, there will be a host of weekday, weekend and evening races alongside the popular informal pursuit-style Scow Capers race every Wednesday.

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Boating season report: Yacht sales are up, shipyards seek workers



Christensen Shipyard 2

Christensen Shipyard, in Vancouver, Wash., now has nine yachts on order. Employment has grown from a low of 70 to 430.











Steve Wilhelm
Staff Writer- Puget Sound Business Journal

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With Seattle’s boating season opening on Saturday, things are looking up for boat builders and brokers.

Sales of superyachts have rebounded since the recession, with some leading Washington yacht builders holding several years worth of orders. And builders are searching for skilled people to do the work.

“They’ve turned the corner, business is up,” said Peter Schrappen, director of government affairs for the Northwest Marine Trade Association, speaking specifically about Westport Shipyard, and more generally about the industry.

Opening Day is the first official day of Seattle’s summer boating season, with events that always include a parade of shiny vessels through the Montlake Cut in Seattle. This year the fleet may be even larger, as people acquire new boats.

Sales of smaller pleasure craft in Washington state also are rising. Association President Peter Harris said he expects a sales increase of 12 percent to 14 percent his year, even more than the 11 percent climb in 2013 and the 9 percent growth in 2012.

“If boaters commit to boating early, we’re going to have a great year,” he said, adding that it’s especially good news for boat sellers who survived the recession.

“We’ve got fewer dealers, fewer brokers,” he said. “The dealers that are here today, they’re happy with the sales right now.”

Harris added that the highly skilled nature of the work makes it hard to find the right people, especially with the aerospace industry also up.

“The biggest challenge for the industry is finding the skilled people to do the work,” Harris said.

While local people purchase most smaller craft and even boats in the 30-foot to 40-foot range, the market for made-in-Washington superyachts is global.

Steve Wilhelm covers manufacturing, aerospace and trade for the Puget Sound Business Journal.



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Clipper Race: Evolution of the famous round-the-world event founded by British sailor Sir Robin Knox-Johnston

There were 15 crew on each boat and the 10-month-long race comprised 15 legs,
each available to purchase by ‘leggers’ prepared to pay for their once in a
lifetime experience.

The stopovers included some of the most desirable tourist destinations on the
planet such as Fort Lauderdale, Galapagos Islands, Hawaii, Seychelles and
Cape Town and the notion of ‘escape’ was compelling.

“It would have been nice to have had a bit longer but that first race proved
to be a good competitive race,” recalls Knox-Johnston.

“In a sense we were making it up as we went along in terms of how we did
things but we got the boats round without trouble and it was successful
because everyone came back with big smiles on their faces.”

It was later that Clipper had the brainwave of involving towns, cities and
regions as sponsors so, in the third edition of the race in 2000, each of
the eight boats bore the name of an English city and as the years and have
gone by, so that trend has gone global.

In the current race, there are 12 boats and half of them are tied in with
regions with GREAT Britain, Switzerland, Ireland (Derry~Londonderry~Doire),
Jamaica, Africa (Invest Africa) and Qingdao all signed up and hoping their
boat will win to grab all the global headlines.

This current race is the seventh to be staged in 19 years and the trend
towards globalisation, not just in the route but in the crew recruitment,
continues to drive it forward.

There were 20,160 responses to advertisements this time round with interest
from 50 countries. A total of 692 berths offered to crew from 42 nations.
Applicants who wanted to do the whole race, such as the Telegraph Media
Group
’s Nikki
Banks
will have had to have found £43,070 for the opportunity while
‘leggers’ can pay anything from £4,000 up.

For this, they get a life-changing experience or if Nikki’s blogs are anything
to go by, a deeply disorienting one where characters are tested by the
radical departure from one’s comfort zones.

But it is this that attracts people, Sir Robin maintains and one of the
reasons why demand for places continues to rise.

“The culture of the race hasn’t changed,” he continues. “It started as a race
and the idea is still that you should still race. People don’t come to us
for a holiday. They come to us because they want to do something special
with their lives and sailing round the world is one of those things. It’s
the sailing equivalent of climbing Mount Everest in fact there have been
fewer people who have sailed round the world than who have climbed Mount
Everest.

“If they went to a skipper and started on about being on holiday, they
wouldn’t last long.”

The fleet of boats has been replaced twice in the past 18 years with the new
Clipper 70s making their maiden voyages in this race. Boats are designed and
built with safety in mind because a massive proportion of the crew, except
of course the 12 professional skippers, are sailing novices with little or
no experience.

“We give them a tough training so we know they are safe when they sail and
that will always be our main concern,” says Knox-Johnston.

“We have gone more international since we started. The biggest single group
are the Brits but we now have 42 nationalities so the race is far more
international and we think that will continue. There certainly seems to be a
big demand for it. We see a growth with every race because more and more
people have heard about it.”

The boats might have changed and the spread of nationalities broadened but the
Corinthian culture and tried and tested format are the same and according to
the boss, are here to stay.

“The format of the race is unlikely to change in the future,” adds the British
sailor. “The stopover ports may change – they always change – but the route
will stay pretty much the same. Our way forward continues to be evolution
rather than revolution.”


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Rocky Sailing: Boat Industry Focuses on Value in a Sea of Deals

They’ve researched online and shopped Craigslist and auctions. But one place they haven’t set foot is the showroom. “We’re trying to find a deal,” said Hellier, a 29-year-old from Edina, Minn. “We think we can save 20 percent or more from a private seller.”

Used boats have always outsold new, but five years after the recession, powerboat buyers of every stripe are still focusing on value, value, value. Boat manufacturer Brunswick surveyed 15,000 people and found that the majority liked boats but saw cost as a deterrent.

That’s causing manufacturers to rethink the way they do business, including maintaining or lowering the cost of every new boat from entry-level to high-end. Manufacturers are not only offering new boats below the $20,000 threshold, but even under $5,000 in a few cases.

Mark Niforopulos, general manager of St. Boni Motor Sports in St. Bonifacius, Minn., said that he’s been begging manufacturers for years to change their “exclusionist” thinking. “We went through this fancy phase with all these expensive bells and whistles,” he said. “The industry is badly in need of a reset.”

Boat buyers choose used over new by a factor of 5 to 1, a ratio that retailers and manufacturers would like to narrow.

In 2007, used boats outsold new by only 3 to 1, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

Part of the reason for new boats’ sinking sales was an abundance of bargains after 35 percent of boat dealers closed during the recession, said Matt Gruhn, president of the Marine Retailers Association of the Americas in Brooklyn Park, Minn.

Recovery continues to ebb and flow. The number of new powerboats sold in the United States prerecession had been cut in half by 2010. In 2013, the number grew to more than 160,000, but it still doesn’t qualify as a recovery.

Irwin Jacobs, who owned 16 boat companies in the 1980s and still owns Larson Boat Group in Little Falls, Minn., said the growth in new boat sales, while not stellar, is at sensible levels. “We’re the first business to go in a recession, and the last to come back,” he said.

To rev sales, manufacturers and retailers say they’re putting value front and center. At Brunswick — which owns nearly a dozen brands, including Mercury, Bayliner, Lowe, Sea Ray, Crestliner and Lund — Chairman and CEO Dusty McCoy said, “Every new model made should cost the same or less than the model it replaces.”

But it’s not about stripping a model to make it affordable. McCoy said many new models come standard with features that today’s buyers expect, such as joystick docking for easier maneuverability, state-of-the-art dash systems and fuel-efficient engines.

“Consumers want more but expect to pay less,” McCoy said. “They want more standard features without a higher price. It’s happening across the industry.”

Dan Chesky Jr., co-owner of Dan’s Southside Marine in Bloomington, Minn., said that he’s completely changed his customer approach. He’s added an affordability page on his website so customers can see how a new boat fits in their budget.

“If someone is spending $150 a month on a cellphone, we can show them how to own a new boat for about the same amount,” Chesky said.

The monthly payment on a 16 1/2-foot new Alumacraft with a 50-horsepower, four-stroke engine with fish finder, trolling motor, cover and trailer is $159, assuming a $17,628 purchase price, 10 percent down and financing for 12 years at 5.49 percent.

“We say that you could own that boat for less than $200 a month instead of throwing out an $18,000 price tag,” Chesky said. (Interest rates vary from 4.99 to 18.95 percent, depending on a customer’s credit.)

Chesky said most buyers make extra payments to pay the boat off faster, but they still negotiate hard to get the original selling price down. “The wife says, ‘We really don’t need this,’ and the husband says, ‘If I can get it for this price, let’s do it.'”


Similar news:

Rocky Sailing: Boat Industry Focuses on Value in a Sea of Deals

They’ve researched online and shopped Craigslist and auctions. But one place they haven’t set foot is the showroom. “We’re trying to find a deal,” said Hellier, a 29-year-old from Edina, Minn. “We think we can save 20 percent or more from a private seller.”

Used boats have always outsold new, but five years after the recession, powerboat buyers of every stripe are still focusing on value, value, value. Boat manufacturer Brunswick surveyed 15,000 people and found that the majority liked boats but saw cost as a deterrent.

That’s causing manufacturers to rethink the way they do business, including maintaining or lowering the cost of every new boat from entry-level to high-end. Manufacturers are not only offering new boats below the $20,000 threshold, but even under $5,000 in a few cases.

Mark Niforopulos, general manager of St. Boni Motor Sports in St. Bonifacius, Minn., said that he’s been begging manufacturers for years to change their “exclusionist” thinking. “We went through this fancy phase with all these expensive bells and whistles,” he said. “The industry is badly in need of a reset.”

Boat buyers choose used over new by a factor of 5 to 1, a ratio that retailers and manufacturers would like to narrow.

In 2007, used boats outsold new by only 3 to 1, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

Part of the reason for new boats’ sinking sales was an abundance of bargains after 35 percent of boat dealers closed during the recession, said Matt Gruhn, president of the Marine Retailers Association of the Americas in Brooklyn Park, Minn.

Recovery continues to ebb and flow. The number of new powerboats sold in the United States prerecession had been cut in half by 2010. In 2013, the number grew to more than 160,000, but it still doesn’t qualify as a recovery.

Irwin Jacobs, who owned 16 boat companies in the 1980s and still owns Larson Boat Group in Little Falls, Minn., said the growth in new boat sales, while not stellar, is at sensible levels. “We’re the first business to go in a recession, and the last to come back,” he said.

To rev sales, manufacturers and retailers say they’re putting value front and center. At Brunswick — which owns nearly a dozen brands, including Mercury, Bayliner, Lowe, Sea Ray, Crestliner and Lund — Chairman and CEO Dusty McCoy said, “Every new model made should cost the same or less than the model it replaces.”

But it’s not about stripping a model to make it affordable. McCoy said many new models come standard with features that today’s buyers expect, such as joystick docking for easier maneuverability, state-of-the-art dash systems and fuel-efficient engines.

“Consumers want more but expect to pay less,” McCoy said. “They want more standard features without a higher price. It’s happening across the industry.”

Dan Chesky Jr., co-owner of Dan’s Southside Marine in Bloomington, Minn., said that he’s completely changed his customer approach. He’s added an affordability page on his website so customers can see how a new boat fits in their budget.

“If someone is spending $150 a month on a cellphone, we can show them how to own a new boat for about the same amount,” Chesky said.

The monthly payment on a 16 1/2-foot new Alumacraft with a 50-horsepower, four-stroke engine with fish finder, trolling motor, cover and trailer is $159, assuming a $17,628 purchase price, 10 percent down and financing for 12 years at 5.49 percent.

“We say that you could own that boat for less than $200 a month instead of throwing out an $18,000 price tag,” Chesky said. (Interest rates vary from 4.99 to 18.95 percent, depending on a customer’s credit.)

Chesky said most buyers make extra payments to pay the boat off faster, but they still negotiate hard to get the original selling price down. “The wife says, ‘We really don’t need this,’ and the husband says, ‘If I can get it for this price, let’s do it.'”


Similar news: