Archive for » February, 2014 «

Dominion Marine Media acquires online boat sales sites

Posted on February 28th, 2014


Dominion Marine Media said it acquired Servicios Náuticos de Internet, S.L., the owner and operator of online boat sales portals Cosas de Barcos in Spain, iNautia in Italy and iNautia in France.

Dominion said the business was acquired from the Barcelona-based investment group Grupo Intercom S.A.

“DMM has long held strong positions in all its global markets, with 23 localized websites in 13 languages attracting an average of more than 52 million unique visitors in 2013,” Dominion Marine Media senior vice president and general manager Ian Atkins said in a statement.

“The acquisition of Cosas de Barcos in Spain, iNautia in Italy and iNautia in France further extends this reach, creating an even stronger platform for us to continue our geographic expansion and organic sales growth.”

“The timing of this deal is excellent, as the European leisure marine market is starting to show signs of a recovery,” he added. “The U.S. has seen 6 to 7 percent growth for the last two years, and we now anticipate Europe starting to do the same.”

Cosas de Barcos has more than 650 registered dealership customers and features more than 53,000 boats for sale, making it the clear market leader in Spain, Dominion said. The two iNautia portals also have a strong presence in France and Italy, which Dominion said makes the acquisition an excellent fit with its brands, which have already developed strong positions in those regions.

The three brands will be maintained under Dominion Marine Media’s ownership and the business will continue to operate from its Barcelona headquarters.

Dominion said the acquisition gives it a stronger global presence, with more than 5,500 boat sales companies as customers, and market-leading online boat sales portals in 13 languages. Globally, Dominion Marine Media features more than 520,000 boats for sale worth an estimated $20.8 billion, and in Europe more than 140,000 boats for sale valued at an estimated $7.1 billion.


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Clipper Race 2013-14: Bottlescrew issue raises questions over One-Design racing

Skippers reported excessive keel movement so all the boats were quickly
diverted to Subic Bay in the Philippines where the the faulty parts were
replaced and strengthened.

The loss of a keel is the most dangerous of all gear failures since a boat can
upturn in seconds with disastrous consequences as Tony Bullimore famously
discovered in the 1996 Vendee Globe, when the Briton has had to be rescued,
so safety has to be at the forefront of all Clipper’s equipment selections,
says Race Director Justin Taylor.

“When one forestay went on Jamaica, we didn’t suspend racing because we
thought it was a one-off then two more went in quick succession and it
became apparent that it could be a fleet-wide problem,” he said.

“Safety underpins everything we do at Clipper so it was an easy decision to
make the decision to suspend racing and take the fleet to Hong Kong to make
repairs.

“We can’t cut costs when we are making our equipment choices. When safety is
involved, we do not care about costs. We will spend whatever we need to put
a problem right.

“Everything on our boats are items you can buy off the shelf because we need
to have boats that we can repair ourselves anywhere without specialist help.

“These forestays are a case in point – the bottlescrews that have gone can be
bought anywhere. They have failed and we will get to the bottom as to why in
due course but we have a solution to correct that which has been signed off
by surveyors and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) so we are
perfectly happy with that.

“If we hadn’t designed the yachts so that all parts were interchangeable then
this would not be possible. By the end of the weekend, we will have 12 boats
re-rigged and sailing again. Who else in the world can turn round 12 racing
boats and get them racing again in such short order.”

“The logistical problems of getting all 12 boats in one place and getting the
right parts and the right personnel out to repair them is probably our
biggest nightmare in all of this but it has all been factored in.”

Race officials at the Volvo Ocean Race are watching closely, keen to
circumvent costly problems if possible. Trials on some of their brand new
identical Volvo 65s have now stretched to 10,000 nms which should minimise
problems on the race track, said Volvo race director Jack Lloyd.

“We fully expect to have issues with bits and pieces on our boats,” he said. “We
are very new into our programme but so is Clipper because these Clipper 70s
are brand new boats. They had a few problems at the start and were short of
testing time and they have sailed in some really atrocious conditions.

“People are paying to have the experience in the Clipper whereas we designed a
different product for professional sailors but I can’t imagine a situation
where we would stop racing and get all the boats in to fix them because in
the Volvo, getting to the end of a leg is half the challenge.

“If we had three forestay problems, we would inspect the whole fleet because
we would want to know if it was down to the way the boat was being sailed or
down to the equipment.”


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£100,000 donation will help hundreds of youngsters learn to sail

£100,000 donation will help hundreds of youngsters learn to sail

By Emma Walker, Reporter

GENEROUS DONATION: Students Harvey Camp and Jessica Smith with Di Ludlow, Elma Shipley and Olympian Simon Hiscocks.

THE memory of a ‘generous’ and ‘kind’ man will live on thanks to a £100,000 donation to the popular Sail for a Fiver’ scheme.

The Chesil Trust, which oversees the scheme, was presented a cheque from Elma Shipley in memory of her husband Rod who died in 2012.

Sail for a Fiver will now continue to get thousands of youngsters to learn the sport for another three years.

The funding will also be used to provide two sailing boats to the Chesil Sailability scheme.

A celebration took place at the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy to mark the 10 year anniversary of Sail for a Fiver, as well as its bright future.

The cheque was presented by Mrs Shipley to Olympic medal winner and patron of the Chesil Trust Simon Hiscocks and chairman of the Chesil Trust Di Ludlow.

Di Ludlow said: “Rod was known for his love of the open waters as well as his generosity, humour and kindness.

“He came from modest means and now his memory will live on through the scheme.

“The scheme will be renamed the Rod Shipley Sail for a Fiver scheme in recognition and thanks to Mrs Shipley for the generous donation in memory of Rod.”

She added: “The Sail for a Fiver scheme has enabled more than 12,000 Dorset children between the ages of 10 and 11 to experience sailing on our Olympic waters.”

Mr Shipley owned Chesil Beach Motors and was a popular local businessman.

Born in Pickering, North Yorkshire he was educated at The Royal Hospital School in Holbrook where he experienced sailing for the first time.

In recognition of this inspiration, his wife Elma, who lives on Portland, donated £100,000 to give local school children a chance to experience sailing.

Mr Hiscocks thanked Mrs Shipley for her ‘very generous’ donation on behalf of the trust.

School pupils from IPACA were also on hand to present Mrs Shipley a bouquet of flowers.

Portland’s Adam Greaves took part in the scheme in 2007, having never tried sailing before, and is now a local sailing success.

He told the Echo that first afternoon session sparked his passion for competitive sailing and urged local youngsters to give it a go.

He said: “Many children who live around here have probably never tried sailing but they should. This is a staggering donation and I am so pleased that the scheme will continue for another three years.”

The trust works with providers – the Weymouth Outdoor Education Centre and the specialist sailing school based at the Sailing Academy – which in turn works closely with schools throughout Dorset.

The programme allows Year 6 schoolchildren to sail for a charge of just £5.

The trust then tops this up to make sure the providers can cover their costs.

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Late Weymouth businessman's name will sail on thanks to a £100,000 donation to Sail for a Fiver scheme

Late Weymouth businessman’s name will sail on thanks to a £100,000 donation to Sail for a Fiver scheme

By Emma Walker, Reporter

GENEROUS DONATION: Students Harvey Camp and Jessica Smith with Di Ludlow, Elma Shipley and Olympian Simon Hiscocks.

THE memory of a ‘generous’ and ‘kind’ man will live on thanks to a £100,000 donation to the popular Sail for a Fiver’ scheme.

The Chesil Trust, which oversees the scheme, was presented a cheque from Elma Shipley in memory of her husband Rod who died in 2012.

Sail for a Fiver will now continue to get thousands of youngsters to learn the sport for another three years.

The funding will also be used to provide two sailing boats to the Chesil Sailability scheme.

A celebration took place at the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy to mark the 10 year anniversary of Sail for a Fiver, as well as its bright future.

The cheque was presented by Mrs Shipley to Olympic medal winner and patron of the Chesil Trust Simon Hiscocks and chairman of the Chesil Trust Di Ludlow.

Di Ludlow said: “Rod was known for his love of the open waters as well as his generosity, humour and kindness.

“He came from modest means and now his memory will live on through the scheme.

“The scheme will be renamed the Rod Shipley Sail for a Fiver scheme in recognition and thanks to Mrs Shipley for the generous donation in memory of Rod.”

She added: “The Sail for a Fiver scheme has enabled more than 12,000 Dorset children between the ages of 10 and 11 to experience sailing on our Olympic waters.”

Mr Shipley owned Chesil Beach Motors and was a popular local businessman.

Born in Pickering, North Yorkshire he was educated at The Royal Hospital School in Holbrook where he experienced sailing for the first time.

In recognition of this inspiration, his wife Elma, who lives on Portland, donated £100,000 to give local school children a chance to experience sailing.

Mr Hiscocks thanked Mrs Shipley for her ‘very generous’ donation on behalf of the trust.

School pupils from IPACA were also on hand to present Mrs Shipley a bouquet of flowers.

Portland’s Adam Greaves took part in the scheme in 2007, having never tried sailing before, and is now a local sailing success.

He told the Echo that first afternoon session sparked his passion for competitive sailing and urged local youngsters to give it a go.

He said: “Many children who live around here have probably never tried sailing but they should. This is a staggering donation and I am so pleased that the scheme will continue for another three years.”

The trust works with providers – the Weymouth Outdoor Education Centre and the specialist sailing school based at the Sailing Academy – which in turn works closely with schools throughout Dorset.

The programme allows Year 6 schoolchildren to sail for a charge of just £5.

The trust then tops this up to make sure the providers can cover their costs.

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US Missing the Boat on Halting Iraq Arms Sales

In a news briefing on Monday, the State Department spokesperson, Jen Psaki, said the United States has “serious concerns” about recent media reports that Iraq may have signed a $195 million weapons deal with Iran. If the unconfirmed reports are true, the deal would violate UN Security Council Resolution 1747, which bans Iran from transferring arms to any third country. Yet the US, in going ahead with its own arms sales to Iraq, misses the point. The US should focus on the strong likelihood that Iraq’s security forces will use US weapons to commit abuses and further entrench sectarian divisions within the country.

The deadline for Congress to stop the small arms and Hellfire rockets deliveries passed days ago and the deadline to stop the Apache sales is midnight tonight. In the absence of immediate congressional action —of which there is no evidence—Congress has missed its final chance to stop the administration’s poor policymaking on these arms sales.

The US has long supported the Iraqi government with arms, though the Iraqi government has committed serious, widespread abuses against its own people in the name of counterterrorism. That has proven ineffective in combating terrorism but has stoked resentment. Psaki acknowledged that the US has “providedthe Iraqi military and security forces with more than $15 billion in equipment, services, and training,” and recently delivered to Iraq “Hellfire missiles and hundreds of small arms along with large quantities of small arms and tank ammunition,” but did not address the copious evidence giving cause for concern that Iraq will use these weapons to continue abuses.

The State Department’s own 2012 Human Rights report noted that “Human rights violations committed by [Iraqi Security Forces] personnel were rarely investigated, and perpetrators were seldom punished,” and that the government “did not take widespread action to reform security forces to improve human rights.”

The new Human Rights Watch research about the treatment of women in Iraq’s criminal justice system, for example, shows that security forces frequently subject detained women to torture and ill-treatment, including the threat of sexual abuse. In early January, Anbar residents told us that the army’s mortar fire on residential neighborhoods had killed at least 25 residents in the first few days of fighting in Fallujah.

In November, we documented how Iraqi security forces, including agents from Special Weapons and Tactics [SWAT] in the Counterterrorism Service [CTS]—precisely the security forces who, along with the army, are at the forefront of the fighting in Anbar—abused residents by surrounding and closing off majority Sunni neighborhoods, illegally raiding homes and carrying out mass arrests. Since 2010 we have repeatedly reported that security forces including SWAT, Federal Police, and the army use unlawful force against peaceful protesters; carry out illegal arrests, interrogations, and detentions, and systematically use torture during interrogations.

A number of other credible experts, including the International Crisis Group and the Institute for the Study of War, have also extensively documented security force abuses. These reports should have been a strong indicator to the administration that the sale of significant defense items for counterterrorism purposes might lead to greater instability, not less.

These concerns were not lost on a bipartisan group of senior Senators, including Robert Menendez, Carl Levin, Bob Corker, and John McCain,who rightly voiced concerns over the abusive tactics systematically used by army and security forces when Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki visited the US seeking military assistance in November.

American laws on Foreign Military Sales require the government to vet and prevent provision of arms and other assistance to abusive military units. Under the Arms Export Control Act of 1976 [ACEA],Congress has the power to issue a resolution of disapproval within 30 days of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency’s notification to Congress of an impending sale. It is unclear whether these weapons sales to Iraq were vetted thoroughly, but the consistent documentation of security forces’ patterns of abuse were a foreboding indicator of how these weapons could be used.

The Iraqi government desperately needs to address insurgent groups’ abuses in Iraq and protect its citizens from the violence that claimed over 8,000 civilian lives last year. The government failed to protect its citizens, instead further entrenching abuses and giving further momentum to Iraq’s cruel cycle of instability. The United States government should be taking every possible step to ensure that its weapons are not going to be used for further abuses.

In contrast, the administration’s concern about the possibility of Iran’s arms sale to Iraq seems disappointingly misplaced in light of the overwhelming evidence of abusive and illegal techniques by SWAT, the Federal Police, and the army—strong evidence that the weapons being supplied would be used for further abuse. With Congress too having missed the boat on its responsibility to make decisions in line with the US’s human rights obligations, the inevitable result is that the US becomes complicit in the rapidly devolving situation in Iraq.


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Dominion Marine Media acquires Servicios Nauticos de Internet

NORFOLK, Va. – Dominion Marine Media (DMM), the world leader in online boat sales, announced it has acquired Servicios Náuticos de Internet, S.L., owner and operator of the leading online boat sales portals Cosas de Barcos in Spain, iNautia in Italy and iNautia in France. The business was acquired from the Barcelona-based investment group, Grupo Intercom S.A.

Cosas de Barcos has more than 650 registered dealership customers and features more than 53,000 boats for sale, making it the clear market leader in Spain. The two iNautia portals also have a strong presence in France and Italy, making the acquisition an excellent fit with DMM’s brands, which have already developed strong positions in those regions. The three brands will be maintained under DMM’s ownership, and the business will continue to operate from its Barcelona headquarters.

This acquisition gives DMM an even stronger global presence, with more than 5,500 boat sales companies as customers, and market-leading online boat sales portals in 13 languages. Globally, DMM features more than 520,000 boats for sale worth an estimated $20.8 billion, and in Europe more than 140,000 boats for sale valued at an estimated $7.1 billion.

Spain, Italy and France represent a significant part of the recreational marine market in Europe. This move, orchestrated from DMM’s European base of operations in the U.K., reinforces DMM’s position as the world’s most popular marine website group. DMM recently launched an extensive sales and marketing effort in Germany, Europe’s wealthiest economy, and has added 125 new boat dealer clients in the last 10 months.

With more than 180 employees and its strong portfolio of national and international online brands (including market-leading web portals boats.com, YachtWorld and Boat Trader), DMM has always sought to provide the best online customer experience by offering the best advertising and software solutions. DMM today is the definitive information resource for boat buyers, sellers, dealers and boat manufacturers alike.

Ian Atkins, senior vice president and general manager of DMM, commented: “DMM has long held strong positions in all its global markets, with 23 localised websites in 13 languages attracting an average of more than 52 million unique visitors in 2013. The acquisition of Cosas de Barcos in Spain, iNautia in Italy and iNautia in France further extends this reach, creating an even stronger platform for us to continue our geographic expansion and organic sales growth.”

Atkins continued, “The timing of this deal is excellent, as the European leisure marine market is starting to show signs of a recovery. The U.S. has seen 6-7% growth for the last two years, and we now anticipate Europe starting to do the same.”

Oliver Winbolt, head of marketing at one of DMM’s large OEM customers, Fairline Boats, added: “We have been working closely with DMM to extend our capabilities across their range of portals, particularly YachtWorld, which help us deliver a wider online audience for our extensive range of 38-foot to 78-foot yachts. It’s great to see DMM continuing to expand its network, providing even better coverage for our dealer network as it continues to grow.”

 


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Marina bars Trans Asia vessel from sailing

Leena Salim’s showreel – musical performances

See below for Leena’s biodata: Artiste: Leena Salim Musical Genres: Pop, Jazz, Contemporary, RB, Soul, Cabaret, Motown, Musicals Location: Singapore Faceboo……


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Waterfronts: Ventura High team's weekend trip ends with frightening night

The Ventura High sailing team had a successful racing weekend on San Francisco Bay followed by a frightening night on the way back to Ventura.

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US Missing the Boat on Halting Iraq Arms Sales

In a news briefing on Monday, the State Department spokesperson, Jen Psaki, said the United States has “serious concerns” about recent media reports that Iraq may have signed a $195 million weapons deal with Iran. If the unconfirmed reports are true, the deal would violate UN Security Council Resolution 1747, which bans Iran from transferring arms to any third country. Yet the US, in going ahead with its own arms sales to Iraq, misses the point. The US should focus on the strong likelihood that Iraq’s security forces will use US weapons to commit abuses and further entrench sectarian divisions within the country.

The deadline for Congress to stop the small arms and Hellfire rockets deliveries passed days ago and the deadline to stop the Apache sales is midnight tonight. In the absence of immediate congressional action — of which there is no evidence — Congress has missed its final chance to stop the administration’s poor policymaking on these arms sales.

The US has long supported the Iraqi government with arms, though the Iraqi government has committed serious, widespread abuses against its own people in the name of counterterrorism. That has proven ineffective in combating terrorism but has stoked resentment. Psaki acknowledged that the US has “provided the Iraqi military and security forces with more than $15 billion in equipment, services, and training,” and recently delivered to Iraq “Hellfire missiles and hundreds of small arms along with large quantities of small arms and tank ammunition,” but did not address the copious evidence giving cause for concern that Iraq will use these weapons to continue abuses.

The State Department’s own 2012 Human Rights report noted, “Human rights violations committed by [Iraqi Security Forces] personnel were rarely investigated, and perpetrators were seldom punished,” and that the government “did not take widespread action to reform security forces to improve human rights.”

The new Human Rights Watch research about the treatment of women in Iraq’s criminal justice system, for example, shows that security forces frequently subject detained women to torture and ill-treatment, including the threat of sexual abuse. In early January, Anbar residents told us that the army’s mortar fire on residential neighborhoods had killed at least 25 residents in the first few days of fighting in Fallujah.

In November, we documented how Iraqi security forces, including agents from Special Weapons and Tactics [SWAT] in the Counterterrorism Service [CTS] — precisely the security forces who, along with the army, are at the forefront of the fighting in Anbar — abused residents by surrounding and closing off majority Sunni neighborhoods, illegally raiding homes and carrying out mass arrests. Since 2010 we have repeatedly reported that security forces including SWAT, federal police, and the army use unlawful force against peaceful protesters; carry out illegal arrests, interrogations, and detentions, and systematically use torture during interrogations.

A number of other credible experts, including the International Crisis Group and the Institute for the Study of War, have also extensively documented security force abuses. These reports should have been a strong indicator to the administration that the sale of significant defense items for counterterrorism purposes might lead to greater instability, not less.

These concerns were not lost on a bipartisan group of senior Senators, including Robert Menendez, Carl Levin, Bob Corker, and John McCain, who rightly voiced concerns over the abusive tactics systematically used by army and security forces when Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki visited the US seeking military assistance in November.

American laws on Foreign Military Sales require the government to vet and prevent provision of arms and other assistance to abusive military units. Under the Arms Export Control Act of 1976 [ACEA], Congress has the power to issue a resolution of disapproval within 30 days of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency’s notification to Congress of an impending sale. It is unclear whether these weapons sales to Iraq were vetted thoroughly, but the consistent documentation of security forces’ patterns of abuse were a foreboding indicator of how these weapons could be used.

The Iraqi government desperately needs to address insurgent groups’ abuses in Iraq and protect its citizens from the violence that claimed over 8,000 civilian lives last year. The government failed to protect its citizens, instead further entrenching abuses and giving further momentum to Iraq’s cruel cycle of instability. The United States government should be taking every possible step to ensure that its weapons are not going to be used for further abuses.

In contrast, the administration’s concern about the possibility of Iran’s arms sale to Iraq seems disappointingly misplaced in light of the overwhelming evidence of abusive and illegal techniques by SWAT, the federal police, and the army — strong evidence that the weapons being supplied would be used for further abuse. With Congress too having missed the boat on its responsibility to make decisions in line with the US’s human rights obligations, the inevitable result is that the US becomes complicit in the rapidly devolving situation in Iraq.

Erin Evers is a Middle East researcher at Human Rights Watch who has done extensive work in Iraq.


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Dealers optimistic at New England Boat Show

Posted on February 25th, 2014
Written by Reagan Haynes


ne20225

BOSTON — Though traffic seemed light at the Progressive Insurance New England Boat Show on Monday, dealers said that only three days into the 10-day show this year’s event was on track to be their best in years.

“It’s been very good for both leads and sales,” Michael Bodnar, general manager of Fay’s Boat Yard on Lake Winnipesaukee, N.H., told Trade Only Today at the show on Monday. “The weather this weekend definitely helped get people in the mood.”

Highs in the Boston area cracked 50 last weekend with sunshine providing a welcome reprieve from the snowy weather that has pummeled the region.

“This is the best two-day start we’ve ever had,” said Chris Lufkin, who represents EdgeWater Power Boats, Hornet Marine and Ribcraft USA as president of Marine Industry Advisors LLC.

EdgeWater has been a hot-selling brand, said Capt. Mike Fulcher, a yacht service foreman with Bosun’s Marine. That was not altogether surprising in the saltwater fish segment, which has done well nationwide, and particularly in the Northeast, according to sales data.

“We’ve sold nine EdgeWaters so far and they’re at a higher price point for their size range,” Fulcher said. “These guys [buying these boats] know what they’re looking for.”

Fulcher said sales had been to all kinds of people — some trading up, some trading down — and to more families than a few years back.

Larry Russo, of Russo Marine, said Boston Whaler, a market leader in the saltwater fish segment, also performed well during the show’s first weekend.

“Whaler was just great, and attendance was way up over the weekend,” Russo said. “We had great weather. The new and pre-owned activity was stronger in the first weekend than it’s been in years.”

Whaler president Huw Bowen said the boats are practical and versatile, which appeals to today’s boat buyer.

“For example, with the Vantage, look how easy it is to maintain. You can just hose it down when you’re done. It’s got outboard power, so it’s easy to just pull up and out of the saltwater, and people tend to not want a cabin anymore when they’ve got kids and are interested in boats that can do everything — watersports, cruising and fishing — all in one boat,” Bowen told Trade Only.

Greenline, a Slovenian hybrid that Russo Marine took on in recent years, also had a lot of traffic on Monday. Several people waited to look at the 40 and the 33. The latter had a clear panel over the engine so curious consumers could see how it worked, Russo said.

“The boat appeals to the Tesla owners,” said Larry Russo Jr., who helps his father operate the family business, adding that the boats were especially crowded during the weekend.

Bodnar said Chaparral Boats were in high demand as well.

“Chaparral’s been such a great company to work with, and they’ve got such a good sense of innovation,” he said. “They come up with something new every year and they’re willing to listen to their customers as well as their dealers. They’re not just rolling out the same models over and over again.”

Finally this year, the show seemed to be going well across all segments, said show manager Joe O’Neal. “For the past couple of years it seemed like one brand or one segment of the market did well,” he said. “This year I haven’t seen any weakness anywhere.”

The show sold out of exhibition space and had to trim some attractions, such as remote-controlled sailboats, to meet demand, O’Neal said.

“We were just sold out solid with no ability to add space,” he said.

The remote-controlled sailboats, which delighted children at last year’s show, were among the activities cut to fit in new exhibitors, including three new sailboat companies that displayed Dehler, Blue Jacket and Bavaria. The Boston Convention Center, with its vaulted ceilings, creates an optimal indoor display venue for boats, something that more companies were catching on to, O’Neal said.

“There has been some good activity in the sailboat market,” he said.


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