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Weather delays bid for world sailing record

First Coast News

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ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — A St. Augustine man planning to sail around the world in record time had to take a rain check Saturday.

Dr. Stanley Paris had planned to set out Saturday afternoon. 

But after tow boats refused to lead the Kiwi Spirit out because of weather conditions, Paris postponed his voyage until 7 a.m. Sunday.

The 76-year-old told First Coast News his goal is to sail around the world alone, making him the oldest person to accomplish the feat.

He aims to finish faster than anyone else before him, breaking the current record of 150 days, 6 hours and 1 minute held by Dodge Morgan.

Paris wants to make the same trip, about 27,000 miles, between 120 and 130 days.

He also plans on being the first person to ever do it without using any fossil fuels for power or propulsion.

Paris says no one has ever tried it without using hydrocarbons.

So he has solar panels, wind turbines and even hydrogenerators — turbines that generate power when move through water — to power his electronic equipment.


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Burling and Tuke take out top NZ sailing award

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke

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Rising stars Peter Burling and Blair Tuke have been named New Zealand sailors of the year after a rich haul of titles around the globe.

Burling and Tuke’s stack of victories within the 12 months preceding September 30 were highlighted by the 49er European and World titles plus their roles as skipper and tactician with the Youth America’s Cup winning team.

That made them an irresistible choice for the prestigious award which was presented by former winner Sir Russell Coutts.

“It’s really special, there are a lot of really great people who have done amazing things in our sport. New Zealand is one of the top sailing nations, so the people on this trophy are some of the best sailors in the world so to have our names alongside them is pretty special and very humbling,” Tuke said.

Burling was delighted to win the top award after being a four-time winner of the young sailor of the year title.

“We’ve been in the mix a lot of times, but to actually get a world title under us this year and a really get a really good year and get given it over a couple of the others who have had amazing years as well, it’s been an amazing year for the sport and we’re really looking forward to the future.”

The men edged Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie, the women’s 470 world champions who were named world women’s sailors of the year earlier, for the top gong in New Zealand sailing.

Burling and Tuke’s next assignment is to contest the famous Sydney to Hobart blue water classic on Boxing Day – on different boats.

Yachting New Zealand annual awards:

House of Travel Sailor of the Year: Peter Burling Blair Tuke (49er World and European Champions)

Volvo Young Sailor of the Year: Molly Meech (49erFX World Champion)

BG Coach/Official of the Year: Nathan Handley and Hamish Willcox

2013 Zhik Emerging Talent Award Winner: Nick Egnot-Johnson (2013 Australian Optimist National Champion, Winner of the Sir Peter Blake Memorial Trophy, 1st (out of 163) at the Optimist North Island Championships 2012)

– © Fairfax NZ News



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Rising stars Peter Burling and Blair Tuke have been named New Zealand sailors of the year after a rich haul of titles around the globe.

Burling and Tuke’s stack of victories within the 12 months preceding September 30 were highlighted by the 49er European and World titles plus their roles as skipper and tactician with the Youth America’s Cup winning team.

That made them an irresistible choice for the prestigious award which was presented by former winner Sir Russell Coutts.

“It’s really special, there are a lot of really great people who have done amazing things in our sport. New Zealand is one of the top sailing nations, so the people on this trophy are some of the best sailors in the world so to have our names alongside them is pretty special and very humbling,” Tuke said.

Burling was delighted to win the top award after being a four-time winner of the young sailor of the year title.

“We’ve been in the mix a lot of times, but to actually get a world title under us this year and a really get a really good year and get given it over a couple of the others who have had amazing years as well, it’s been an amazing year for the sport and we’re really looking forward to the future.”

The men edged Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie, the women’s 470 world champions who were named world women’s sailors of the year earlier, for the top gong in New Zealand sailing.

Burling and Tuke’s next assignment is to contest the famous Sydney to Hobart blue water classic on Boxing Day – on different boats.

Yachting New Zealand annual awards:

House of Travel Sailor of the Year: Peter Burling Blair Tuke (49er World and European Champions)

Volvo Young Sailor of the Year: Molly Meech (49erFX World Champion)

BG Coach/Official of the Year: Nathan Handley and Hamish Willcox

2013 Zhik Emerging Talent Award Winner: Nick Egnot-Johnson (2013 Australian Optimist National Champion, Winner of the Sir Peter Blake Memorial Trophy, 1st (out of 163) at the Optimist North Island Championships 2012)

– © Fairfax NZ News



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Burling and Tuke named Sailor of the Year

On the golden anniversary of the Award the prestigious 2013 House of Travel Sailor of the Year has gone to Peter Burling and Blair Tuke.

It has been a massive year for New Zealand sailing with an extraordinary three Olympic class world titles, the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup title and the 2013 Louis Vuitton Cup; the list of sailing achievements during 2013 was unprecedented and in many ways fitting for the golden anniversary celebration. In another year a number of this year’s contenders could easily have secured the Sailor of the Year title making it no easy decision for the panel of Awards judges.

Asked what it means to him to join the impressive roll call of sailors who have preceded them Blair Tuke says; “It’s really special, there are a lot of really great people who have done amazing things in our sport. New Zealand is one of the top sailing nations, so the people on this trophy are some of the best sailors in the world so to have our names alongside them is pretty special and very humbling.”

He adds; “it’s not why we do the sport, we do it because we love it and to try and win regattas but to get recognised and get the accolade – it feels really good.”

Burling and Tuke’s stack of victories within the twelve months preceding 31 September 2013 highlighted by the 49er European and World Championship titles, (both career firsts for the pair) plus their roles as skipper and tactician with the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup winning team was enough to edge out the other contenders for this year’s Award.

While Burling has been collecting Awards at this event for many years, including an impressive four-time winner of the Young Sailor of the Year (2006, 2007, 2008 and 2011), this is the first time he has secured the big one. He and Tuke will now have their place in New Zealand sailing history with their names engraved on the Sir Bernard Fergusson Trophy.

At the end of the evening’s presentations Burling said; “We’ve been in the mix a lot of times, but to actually get a world title under us this year and a really get a really good year and get given it over a couple of the others who have had amazing years as well, it’s been an amazing year for the sport and we’re really looking forward to the future.”

Explaining what comes next Burling says; “We’re both doing the Sydney to Hobart on different boats on Boxing Day so that’s on the immediate future. It’s been a really busy time and we’re looking forward to some time off over the summer.”

Yachting New Zealand Performance Awards also went to Women’s 470 World Champions and winners of the 2013 ISAF Female Sailor of the Year Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie, to 2013 49erFX World Champions Alexandra Maloney and Molly Meech (just 21 and 20 years of age), to Emirates Team New Zealand for winning the 2013 Louis Vuitton Cup as well as both New Zealand teams to podium at the inaugural Red Bull Youth America’s Cup.

Volvo Young Sailor of the Year 2013

20 year old Molly Meech, the younger of the 49erFX World Champion duo and just inside the age bracket, was named Young Sailor of the Year for 2013. The Young Sailor of the Year Award was introduced in 1996 and this is the first time in its 17 year history that someone this young has won and Olympic class world title.

Molly Meech, who represents the Tauranga Yacht Powerboat Club, is ranked ISAF World number 1 in the new Olympic class along with helm and team-mate Alexandra Maloney. Going up against sailors with years of Olympic campaigning under their belt the young kiwis’ results have been quite outstanding throughout 2013 highlighted with the World Championship victory in France in September.

Zhik Emerging Talent Award 2013

Winner of the Emerging Talent Award in 2013 was Nick Egnot-Johnson, an up and comer from the Murrays Bay Sailing Club. Among Egnot-Johnson’s accomplishments in 2013 are the 2013 Australian Optimist National Championship title, winner of the Sir Peter Blake Memorial Trophy and 1st (out of 163) at the Optimist North Island Championships 2012).

BG Coach/Official of the Year

The BG Coach/Official of the Year Award went to joint winners Nathan Handley and Hamish Willcox, both key coaches behind the unprecedented success of the NZL Sailing Team at Olympic class regattas during 2013. Before this year New Zealand’s last World title in an Olympic class was in 2008 – and the 2013 World Champs’ haul of three gold medals and one silver is testament to the contribution made by both of these men.

Partridge Jewellers Golden Anniversary Special Prize

In a special one-off prize to celebrate the 50 year milestone of yachting awards in New Zealand Partridge Jewellers offered a special one off prize. Of four finalists Loretta Maloney, Mum of current Olympic campaigners Alexandra and Andy was announced the winner and collects a Partridge Jewellers timepiece or jewellery of her choice to the value of $5000 NZD in recognition of her selfless contribution.

“While living in Kerikeri, she would wake up in the early hours of Saturday mornings to prepare lunches before starting the three and a half hour drive down to Auckland for the regular weekend junior regattas” says son Andy. ” Now ten years later, she is at Pak’n Save or making sure the laundry is done ensuring we have clean gym clothes all week, you can be sure that mum is busy doing things that make our lives easier.”


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Burling and Tuke win NZ sailing award

The 49er combination of Peter Burling and Blair Tuke have won the New Zealand Sailor of the Year award.

On the award’s 50th anniversary, Burling and Tuke beat off contenders that included two other world championship-winning crews – Olympic 470 champions Jo Aleh and Olivia Powrie and 49erFX sailors Alexandra Maloney and Molly Meech – as well as America’s Cup challengers Team New Zealand.

Among their successes on the water in 2013, Burling and Tuke added the 49er world title to the Olympic silver they took away from last year’s London Olympics.

They were also skipper and tactician on the winning New Zealand yacht at the Youth America’s Cup in San Francisco.

The pair’s next assignment is the Sydney-to-Hobart race, which begins on Boxing Day, when they will be on different boats.


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PWC sales remain positive

November 26, 2013
Filed under News

Sales growth for powerboats in the 15-foot-and-greater category have continued to move in a positive direction, according to the latest figures released from Info-Link Technologies. It’s a trend that started with the beginning of 2013 and has continued through the end of the year, even in the face of lackluster early-season weather across much of the United States.

PWC sales growth remained in positive territory. For the latest data covering October, sales growth was in the low single digits, which was slightly less than the previous month.

Ski boat sales growth has hovered at or above 10 percent for much of the past years, dipping slightly back down to the 10-percent mark, down from September’s figure.

Outboards remain the most consistently strong and positive sector of the marine market, with 12-month year-over-year percentage change in unit sales sustained at approximately 10 percent, an insignificant change from the previous mark. Sales of outboard boats 15 feet and greater have been in positive territory since April 2011 and saw a slight sales peak at the end of the summer boating season.

The data is based on new U.S. boat registrations. Bellwether states are geographically dispersed states representing roughly half of the US boat market (which varies by market segment and time of year). Full graphs are available here: Info-Link Technologies Bellwether Report.


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Strong field for Sydney to Hobart yachting race

Australia’s most famous yacht race, the Sydney to Hobart, will boast one of its strongest fields in decades this year due to the nation’s renewed competitiveness in sailing, organisers said on Tuesday.

The race, which begins on Sydney Harbour on Boxing Day, runs 628 nautical miles down the east coast of Australia to the island of Tasmania, a punishing course known for its spectacular scenery and unpredictable weather.

This year five 100-foot super maxis, three 80-footers, fifteen 70-footers and 22 overseas boats will line up for the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia-run race, and commodore Howard Piggott said it showed Australia’s strong international sailing reputation.

“The calibre of this year’s fleet shows that Australian sailing is back and back with a vengeance,” he said.

“Australian yachtsmen and women enjoyed huge success at the 2012 Olympics and Australians figured prominently in the dramatic climax of the America’s Cup.

“The fantastic response to compete in the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race is symptomatic of renewed competitiveness in sailing here.”

Past CYCA commodore Matt Allen, whose 60-footer Ichi Ban is in the field, said it was the best fleet he had seen since the early 1980s.

“This is a grand prix racing fleet,” he said.

Among the 100-foot supermaxis is six-time winner Wild Oats XI which last year completed a historic Sydney to Hobart triple crown, winning the overall handicap as well as line honours and breaking the race record with its time of one day, 18 hours, 23 minutes and 12 seconds.

International entries come from New Zealand, Britain, Hong Kong, Singapore, New Caledonia, Germany and Cyprus — with 12 of them part of the Clipper Round the World Race fleet.

“This will be the most competitive offshore race ever,” said Hong Konger Karl Kwok, who has entered his new New Zealand-built Botin 80 Beau Geste.

“There has never been a line-up of boats sailed at this high level in any offshore event.”

The race has also attracted top crews, with those involved in the America’s Cup and other major ocean races, including Oracle Team USA’s Australian strategist Tom Slingsby, on boats this year.

“This will be my first Rolex Sydney Hobart and my first major offshore ocean race — I haven’t been sick on a yacht before — only once when I was on a fishing boat offshore, so I’m curious as to how I’ll fair,” said Slingsby.

The Sydney to Hobart, which began in 1945, sees yachts race down the southeast mainland coast of Australia, across the dangerous Bass Strait, then along the east coast of Tasmania and up the Derwent River to the historic port of Hobart.


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Yachting: Strong field for Sydney to Hobart

Australia’s most famous yacht race, the Sydney to Hobart, will boast one of its strongest fields in decades this year due to the nation’s renewed competitiveness in sailing, organisers said Tuesday.

The race, which begins on Sydney Harbour on Boxing Day, runs 628 nautical miles down the east coast of Australia to the island of Tasmania, a punishing course known for its spectacular scenery and unpredictable weather.

This year five 100-foot super maxis, three 80-footers, fifteen 70-footers and 22 overseas boats will line up for the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia-run race, and commodore Howard Piggott said it showed Australia’s strong international sailing reputation.

“The calibre of this year’s fleet shows that Australian sailing is back and back with a vengeance,” he said.

“Australian yachtsmen and women enjoyed huge success at the 2012 Olympics and Australians figured prominently in the dramatic climax of the America’s Cup.

“The fantastic response to compete in the Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race is symptomatic of renewed competitiveness in sailing here.”

Past CYCA commodore Matt Allen, whose 60-footer Ichi Ban is in the field, said it was the best fleet he had seen since the early 1980s.

“This is a grand prix racing fleet,” he said.

Among the 100-foot supermaxis is six-time winner Wild Oats XI which last year completed a historic Sydney to Hobart triple crown, winning the overall handicap as well as line honours and breaking the race record with its time of one day, 18 hours, 23 minutes and 12 seconds.

International entries come from New Zealand, Britain, Hong Kong, Singapore, New Caledonia, Germany and Cyprus — with 12 of them part of the Clipper Round the World Race fleet.

“This will be the most competitive offshore race ever,” said Hong Konger Karl Kwok, who has entered his new New Zealand-built Botin 80 Beau Geste.

“There has never been a line-up of boats sailed at this high level in any offshore event.”

The race has also attracted top crews, with those involved in the America’s Cup and other major ocean races, including Oracle Team USA’s Australian strategist Tom Slingsby, on boats this year.

“This will be my first Rolex Sydney Hobart and my first major offshore ocean race — I haven’t been sick on a yacht before — only once when I was on a fishing boat offshore, so I’m curious as to how I’ll fair,” said Slingsby.

The Sydney to Hobart, which began in 1945, sees yachts race down the southeast mainland coast of Australia, across the dangerous Bass Strait, then along the east coast of Tasmania and up the Derwent River to the historic port of Hobart.

mfc/mp/ac


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Sydney to Hobart champ Wild Oats XI still the envy of the fleet

She’s been dubbed the Ferrari of sailing and the Swiss Army knife of yachts, but now Wild Oats XI has been slugged with her meanest title yet.

“It’s like taking an AK47 to a water pistol fight,” skipper Mark Richards declared at the launch of this year’s Sydney to Hobart yacht race on Tuesday.

Richards said two major modifications have made the 2012 line and handicap honours champion and race record holder even quicker heading into the 69th edition of the race on Boxing Day.

And even though one of those changes – a new mast – suffered a “catastrophic failure” on its first outing, Richards is backing super-maxi Wild Oats XI to claim a record-equalling seventh win.

“We’re not going to die wondering, that’s for sure,” Richards said.

“We’ve thrown everything that we can at this boat – it’s coming into its ninth year.

“We really believe that the modifications we’ve done this year will be (produce) significant speed increases in their conditions.

“When we we get back into the water at the end of next week, we’re very confident she’ll be in the fastest form she’s ever been before. It’s exciting.”

But Wild Oats XI faces one of her toughest challenges yet.

Previous line honours winners Ragamuffin 100 and Wild Thing are returning, while the newly-rebuilt Perpetual Loyal looms as a huge threat in her first crack at the race.

“It’s really going come down to conditions,” Richards said.

“When Loyal’s in her conditions, they’re literally going to be knots faster than Wild Oats – and the roles reverse the other way.”

Perpetual Loyal was widely considered the fastest racing super maxi in the world until she capsized in the 2011 Fastnet Race after her keel snapped off.

Anthony Bell bought the boat earlier this year and admits her limited time on the water has made for a nerve-wrecking build-up to Boxing Day.

“We’re training well – so far so good,” said Bell, who will be joined on board by the likes of celebrities Karl Stefanovic, Larry Emdur, Jude Bolton and Olympic gold medallist Tom Slingsby.

“We have a pretty strategic program to get us to the start line on Boxing Day and we’re on schedule for that.

“But we’re up against the best super maxi racing team in the world … in Wild Oats – they’re the Ferrari of sailing sport.

“They run things really well and we don’t underestimate what their preparation will be and what a real tough battle it’ll be for us in a very short period of time to contend her.”

A fleet of 95, said to be strongest in years, is set to contend the race – including five 100-foot super maxis, three 80-footers and 22 overseas boats.

Commodore Howard Piggott says they are record numbers and an indication of Australia’s strong international sailing reputation.

“Yachting’s right in the public’s face at the moment,” Piggott said.

“We had fantastic success at the London Olympics and the Australians were right there during the exciting America’s Cup.

“People have been engaged and are serious about sailing. It’s reflected through the junior classes and it’s now coming through to us which is very exciting.”


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Shooting the breeze in The Whitsundays

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In the Whitsunday Islands, Candida Baker finds even when there’s no wind, life is still a breeze.

So there we are, in the middle of the ocean, and not a breath of wind in sight.

We’ve come to the beautiful Whitsundays for a week’s sailing and even I, as a non-sailor, know that wind is kind of essential. Not only that but because the other half has never experienced the Whitsundays without wind, he hasn’t bought quite enough petrol with him, so we’re not sure if we’ve got enough to get back to Whitsunday Island, where we’re camping for four nights. It’s all a little bit hairy, if you get my drift, which is certainly what we were doing – drifting. Not only that, but something’s gone wrong with the motor and it’s not working.

Surely there must be wind somewhere, we beseech the sky, which taunts us with tiny little gusts from every direction at once.

Finally, the motor decides to splutter into life and, having had to give up on our attempt to get to a snorkelling spot, we opt for lunch in one of the many beautiful coves that dot the edges of these tropical islands. We drop anchor in May Bay among the million-dollar motor-boats and try to look as if, at least because we’ve got sails, we’re superior, which would be all well and good if the sails were actually working. We dive into the clear blue water then eat a delicious picnic lunch on deck. It’s enough to restore our optimism entirely, and even better, the wind picks up.

Unfortunately, the only large gust of wind of the day arrives at the very moment we discover the anchor is stuck deep down below – probably snagged on some coral – and we’re heading at high speed for one of those expensive motor boats, and I have no idea what I’m doing. Disaster is averted by a millimetre, the anchor finally obliges, and we sail for 500 metres before the wind disappears.

Apparently, this is what sailing is all about – hours of boredom, minutes of adrenalin and moments of panic and pandemonium. We motor slowly back to our temporary home on Dugong Beach with our sails between our legs and wonder exactly how we’ll manage to do the snorkelling trip we’ve planned at Blue Pearl Bay the next day, and get back to Shute Harbour in Airlie Beach the day after if we have no wind and not enough fuel.

But in a way, these adventures are part of what we wanted – a down-to-earth (or sea), real-life holiday as far away from the madding crowds as possible. Dugong Beach on Whitsunday Island has only eight camping spots, metres from the edge of the beach, fringed with shade, and walks to Sawmill Beach, or if you’re feeling fit, to the top of Whitsunday Peak. It’s picturesque and peaceful. Soon after we arrive, we are the only two people on the island, with only the resident curlews and goannas for company. We take our chairs down to the sand, watch the lazy resident turtle bob across the bay, and feel very privileged indeed.

Now, though, we’re lucky in a different way – experiencing the kind of friendly helping hand I’ve found is often extended on holidays and I hope I’ve offered in the past.

We meet a couple, Liz and Paul McCarthur, who both work on Hamilton Island, and are taking a few days out camping on Dugong. They offer to take us snorkelling in their motor-powered runabout and we accept their offer gratefully.

If yachts need wind, motorboats most certainly don’t and skimming across the flat ocean the next morning is a treat in itself before we even arrive at Blue Pearl Bay. On the way, we pass Hook Island and Hayman Island and, when we arrive at the bay, one of the lovely things about it is there is every kind of boat there – massive old clippers redone as charter boats, private yachts and motorboats and smaller charter boats. There’s even a custom-designed boat that ferries holidaymakers from Hayman Island and drops them straight on the beach.

It’s a long, thin flat-bottomed affair with three genteel steps forrard (that’s a nautical term, just so you know I was paying attention), so people can walk down on to the coral beach and straight into the water.

And what water it is. This is not my first snorkelling experience on the reef, but it is certainly the best so far. As soon as we slide into the water, we are surrounded by fish of all shapes, sizes and colours – angel fish, butterfly fish, the exquisitely coloured parrot fish and the highlight of this particular bay, the incredibly friendly, curious and massive murray wrasse, which follows snorkellers about in an almost dog-like fashion.

Murray wrasse can live to the ripe old age of 30 and can grow up to two metres long, but are still on the endangered list because of their reputation as a fine fish to eat.

One of the most extraordinary things about snorkelling is not only the invisible presence of this brightly coloured underwater world below the surface of the sea but the blissful silence. I drift through the water, schools of fish twisting and turning around me, and feel completely at peace.

Back at Dugong, we watch the sun turn the sea a golden orange; in the morning we wake to the turquoise, still waters of our little beach where I manage to cook some strangely imaginative meals over our one gas burner.

The cheeky bush rat, the shy potoroo and the tiny marsupial mouse are all visitors to our campsite and no night would be complete without the mournful wailing of the curlews. Every morning I wake to the sight of the beautiful hoop pines that cover this and all the 74 islands of the Whitsunday group, and thank god that they have not been completely deforested.

As the days go by, we become increasingly grateful that we have a tiny luxury in the form of the shower tent for our solar powered shower bought just before we left.

I’d had the foresight to make a bargain – five days sailing and island living in return for two nights of luxury. Clever me. By the time we sail, with a little helpful motor power, of course, since there is still hardly any wind, into Shute Harbour, I’m more than ready for a little luxury.

I’ve chosen Peppers Airlie Beach as our destination and the resort is perfect. A large one-bedroom apartment with a huge spa bath and an even larger deck overlooking the new port harbour complex is exactly what is needed for restoration. The restaurant serves delicious tropical meals and is right next to the wet-edge pool – very easy to go from eating to swimming and back to sleeping.

It’s also a perfect antidote to the 75 (I counted) sandfly bites I unfortunately collect. Warning: take the strongest mosquito repellent that exists and wear it permanently. Ah, tropical island holidays!

Airlie Beach is a perfect holiday town. The European-style restaurants and cafes along the tree-lined boulevard next to the park are beach are full, the child-safe lagoon offers relief for families and children on holidays, and there’s plenty of shopping in the main street.

What the Whitsundays offer is the best of all worlds – a holiday destination everybody can enjoy on any budget.

For me, the mix of adventure and luxury is perfect.

TRIP NOTES

GETTING THERE

To get to Airlie Beach fly Virgin or Jetstar to Proserpine. There are regular shuttle buses to Airlie, which is about 40 minutes away, or hire a car from Proserpine.

SAILING THERE

At Airlie, Shute Harbour has plenty of charter boats on offer. For most of the boats no boat licence is required, and some companies, such as Bare Boat Charters, offer shorter charters of three, four or five nights, see airliebeach.com/bareboatcharters/welcome.html. You can hire anything from a small yacht to a sailing or powered catamaran, a motor-boat, a luxury crewed power cruiser, or a crewed sailing ship. According to charteryachtsaustralia.com.au/, the cheapest charter is around $440 a night for a yacht that will carry a maximum of four up to around $1800 a night for a sailing catamaran which takes up to 10 people; the sky’s the limit on the luxury crewed boats. Charter companies offer boat tuition and help is just a radio call away.

CAMPING THERE

Many of the Whitsunday Islands offer camping. See nprsr.qld.gov.au/parks/.

MORE INFORMATION tourismwhitsundays.com.au

-The Age





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