Archive for » October 8th, 2013«

Boats parade down Vegas Strip in shutdown protest

Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013 | 12:08 a.m.

Boaters who say they’re fed up the government shutdown is keeping them off Lake Mead took to the Las Vegas Strip in protest.

About 20 boats were towed through the tourist corridor between 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday evening. People passing by the watercrafts honked their horns and shouted out of their windows in support.

Organizer Stuart Litjens says he’s frustrated by the gridlock’s effect on small businesses, including his own company, Boulder Boats. He estimates he’ll lose half a million dollars in boat sales if the shutdown continues for a month.

Lake Mead National Recreational Area is one of several parks around Las Vegas that are affected by the closure. Boaters say Lake Havasu, 2 1/2 hours away, is one of the closest bodies of water still open.


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Ordinary people true heroes of Kiwi sailing's great race


Ordinary people true heroes of Kiwi sailing’s
great race

One of the themes to
come out of this year’s entry list in the PIC Insurance
Brokers Coastal Classic, is new entrants to the fleet
setting out to achieve great things.

But we
aren’t talking about the newest, most high tech or grand
prix yachts.

We are talking about generally smaller,
older boats, that have been around the blocks before, with a
new generation of crew looking to make it happen again.

Ashley Rogers – a young chef who was born and bred in
Guatemala – lives and breathes sailing, and recently
purchased a 28 foot Double Diagonal Kauri sailing yacht
named Strider.

Ash is relatively new to sailing, but has
made up for it by packing in as much as she can. She sails
every day except Monday, on a variety of boats, all of which
are happy to have someone that is enthusiastic and hard
working.

The boat might be older than she is, but it is
well proven and seaworthy, and Ashley aims to race her,
alone, across the Tasman, in five years time. With its
reasonably far flung destination, requirement for robust
boat preparation, and a return delivery, the Coastal Classic
is an important step in the process for Ashley, and she will
be racing with four other women, likely to be one of only
two all-female crews in the race.

“I have worked hard
to empty and clean her out and to find all the little bits
and pieces that need repairing. My friends in the sailing
world have helped or given advice,” she says. The Coastal
Classic was the third race that Ash ever took part in.

Kai Skowronnek is a composite boatbuilder involved in the
America’s Cup world who purchased his Reactor 25,
Scintilla, two years ago in Opua and sailed it to Auckland
before pulling it out of the water for a refit. Scintilla
may turn out to be the smallest entrant in this year’s
race.

“I started sailing dinghies when I was
fifteen,” he says. “I like racing, and I like the
challenges that coastal racing has and it is the kind of
sailing I could fill my life with.” Kai’s goal is to get
a well prepared and equipped boat to the start, and then to
sail a great race. He will be racing two handed, with his
friend, Kushila Stein.

Taniwha a 9.5m long, thirty year
old boat formerly known as Sunday Sun and raced extensively
around the Pacific and New Zealand, is now owned by 31 year
old software developer Lewis Callaghan, who has assembled a
team of good friends aged 19 to 49, and is preparing to race
to Fiji in June 2014, before heading off to the Queensland
Regattas in Airlie Beach and Hamilton Island.

Taniwha’s
website describes the team as a group of
“over-enthusiastic amateurs” who are in pursuit of
yachting glory. “We’re not a big boat, but the Taniwha
is fast, and while we lack age, we’re still hardy,” it
says.

Add to the mix, 19 year old Cory McLennan (pictured
above) who last year purchased the 9m racing yacht Atom Ant,
also with the aim of making it to the Solo Tasman, and Chris
Beaumont, who is entering his new purchase, Flying Boat, for
the first time, and there are sure signs of a local sailing
fleet that is paying attention to older, reasonably priced
boats, and taking on remarkable new challenges.

The PIC
Insurance Brokers Coastal Classic is 119 nautical miles long
and depending on the boat you are on, can be a sprint or a
marathon: it takes anything from sub six hours for the
fastest boats, to more than 24 hours for the less
performance oriented.

The spectacular mass start is off
Devonport Wharf at 10am on Friday 25 October, and the finish
line is off the historic Russell Wharf in the Bay of
Islands.

Headline entrants include the giant trimarans
TeamVodafone Sailing and Team Australia, rivaling each other
for the first time in New Zealand waters, and Jim
Delegat’s new 70 foot Giacomo, formerly known as Volvo
Ocean Race winner Groupama, and likely to be the event’s
biggest entrant.

The boats race in eight race divisions
categorised by size and speed. A chance to win an Audi A1 is
one of the feature prizes, along with another $30,000 of
technological and marine related gear from sponsors that
include PIC Insurance Brokers, BG, Jackson Electrical
Industries Limited, Yachting New Zealand, Dirty Dog, Elf
Oils, Musto, Mount Gay Rum, Railblaza, and
PredictWind.com.

The PIC Insurance Brokers Coastal Classic
is organised by the New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club.
Entries close on Friday 11 October. Boat tracking,
commentary, progress times, photos and video will be
available from race start on www.coastalclassic.co.nz.

ENDS

© Scoop Media


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Sailing

Following recent discussions with the RYA Olympic Manager and the Olympic Steering Group, an 11th place finish at the recent 49er World Championship in Marseille reinforced the duo’s belief that their partnership – which encompassed World and European Championship titles as well as two Olympic Games – had reached its peak, with both sailors now eager to explore new sailing opportunities outside of the Olympic Classes.

“We’ve had a great run over many years but I think the result at the recent Worlds just cemented our thinking that our partnership had probably run its course,” the 32-year-old Rhodes admitted.

“The obvious high point for us was in 2007 – the year as a whole.  I think we won pretty much every event we entered including the Worlds so that was a real peak. There’s nothing better than when things are going well and you’re doing that with your best mate.  As Bart [Simpson] and Iain [Percy] always used to say, it’s a pretty cool feeling and you think yourself pretty lucky.

“While we never achieved our ultimate goal of winning an Olympic medal, I think we gave it a pretty good go and I feel pretty proud of what we managed to achieve.”

The 34-year-old Morrison added: “Ben and I have sailed together for so long and have been successful almost across generations of 49er sailors managing to stay on top of our game, so we’ve shown pretty good adaptability and good teamship skills.

“After the Worlds this year we had to look each other in the eye and look at ourselves in the mirror and say for whatever reason we’ve plateaued.  As hard as that is to say, equally you’ve got to look back and say that we were the best in the world for a while, and not many people get to say that. 

“We’ve had a really good career as a team but it’s time to move on and try exploring different avenues.”

The Exmouth-based sailors are both keen to explore sailing campaigns outside of the Olympic Classes, and have been excited by the move in professional sailing towards high performance boats.

“I’d love to keep sailing as much as possible and with the experience of high-level campaigning that I have, I feel I’ve a lot to offer a high-performance sailing team, whether that be in Extreme 40s or Melges boats or whatever it is. I’d be pretty keen to give everything a go!” Rhodes explained.

Morrison added: “There are other guys from our team like Ben Ainslie, Iain Percy, Chris Draper who’ve gone on to the America’s Cup.  It’s an exciting time for the sport of sailing with high performance boats becoming much more the benchmark of sailing, and that exactly suits our background and where we have come from in our sailing.”

While the soon-to-be first-time father Rhodes is hanging up his 49er trapeze harness for good and viewing professional life entirely outside of Olympic campaigning, Morrison admits that he would consider a return to the 49er and a further shot at Olympic gold in Rio, if the circumstances were right and the right crew were to come along.

In the meantime, Morrison has expressed the pair’s gratitude for the support they received during their campaign years.

“We’re really grateful to the RYA and Sparky who was the team manager when I first started out and has been very encouraging over the years.  We also couldn’t have achieved what we did without the help of UK Sport and the National Lottery, as we couldn’t have operated at such a high level without them,” he added.

“On a personal level our friends and family have also been a massive support, as well as our personal sponsors G4S.  For six years they were a huge support to us – they had a tough time after the last Olympics but the people we know have always been a huge help and have always been there for us when we needed them.”

RYA Olympic Manager Stephen Park paid tribute to their years of application and sacrifice chasing their Olympic dream, saying: “Stevie and Ben have been fantastic competitors at the front of the world 49er fleet for some years now. They have delivered great performances for Great Britain over the years, but ultimately didn’t manage to deliver their best performances at the Olympic Games.

“I am sure they will go on to deliver many more top performances in other forms of the sport, and wish them well for the future.”


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Ordinary people 'true heroes of sailing's great race'

One of the themes to come out of this year’s entry list in the PIC Insurance Brokers Coastal Classic, is new entrants to the fleet setting out to achieve great things.

But we aren’t talking about the newest, most high tech or grand prix yachts.

We are talking about generally smaller, older boats, that have been around the blocks before, with a new generation of crew looking to make it happen again.

Ashley Rogers – a young chef who was born and bred in Guatemala – lives and breathes sailing, and recently purchased a 28 foot Double Diagonal Kauri sailing yacht named Strider.

Ash is relatively new to sailing, but has made up for it by packing in as much as she can. She sails every day except Monday, on a variety of boats, all of which are happy to have someone that is enthusiastic and hard working.

The boat might be older than she is, but it is well proven and seaworthy, and Ashley aims to race her, alone, across the Tasman, in five years time. With its reasonably far flung destination, requirement for robust boat preparation, and a return delivery, the Coastal Classic is an important step in the process for Ashley, and she will be racing with four other women, likely to be one of only two all-female crews in the race.

“I have worked hard to empty and clean her out and to find all the little bits and pieces that need repairing. My friends in the sailing world have helped or given advice,” she says. The Coastal Classic was the third race that Ash ever took part in.

Kai Skowronnek is a composite boatbuilder involved in the America’s Cup world who purchased his Reactor 25, Scintilla, two years ago in Opua and sailed it to Auckland before pulling it out of the water for a refit. Scintilla may turn out to be the smallest entrant in this year’s race.

“I started sailing dinghies when I was fifteen,” he says. “I like racing, and I like the challenges that coastal racing has and it is the kind of sailing I could fill my life with.” Kai’s goal is to get a well prepared and equipped boat to the start, and then to sail a great race. He will be racing two handed, with his friend, Kushila Stein.

Taniwha a 9.5m long, thirty year old boat formerly known as Sunday Sun and raced extensively around the Pacific and New Zealand, is now owned by 31 year old software developer Lewis Callaghan, who has assembled a team of good friends aged 19 to 49, and is preparing to race to Fiji in June 2014, before heading off to the Queensland Regattas in Airlie Beach and Hamilton Island.

Taniwha’s website describes the team as a group of “over-enthusiastic amateurs” who are in pursuit of yachting glory. “We’re not a big boat, but the Taniwha is fast, and while we lack age, we’re still hardy,” it says.

Add to the mix, 19 year old Cory McLennan who last year purchased the 9m racing yacht Atom Ant, also with the aim of making it to the Solo Tasman, and Chris Beaumont, who is entering his new purchase, Flying Boat, for the first time, and there are sure signs of a local sailing fleet that is paying attention to older, reasonably priced boats, and taking on remarkable new challenges.

The PIC Insurance Brokers Coastal Classic is 119 nautical miles long and depending on the boat you are on, can be a sprint or a marathon: it takes anything from sub six hours for the fastest boats, to more than 24 hours for the less performance oriented.

The spectacular mass start is off Devonport Wharf at 10am on Friday 25 October, and the finish line is off the historic Russell Wharf in the Bay of Islands.

Headline entrants include the giant trimarans TeamVodafone Sailing and Team Australia, rivaling each other for the first time in New Zealand waters, and Jim Delegat’s new 70 foot Giacomo, formerly known as Volvo Ocean Race winner Groupama, and likely to be the event’s biggest entrant.

The boats race in eight race divisions categorised by size and speed. A chance to win an Audi A1 is one of the feature prizes, along with another $30,000 of technological and marine related gear from sponsors that include PIC Insurance Brokers, BG, Jackson Electrical Industries Limited, Yachting New Zealand, Dirty Dog, Elf Oils, Musto, Mount Gay Rum, Railblaza, and PredictWind.com.

The PIC Insurance Brokers Coastal Classic is organised by the New Zealand Multihull Yacht Club. Entries close on Friday 11 October. Boat tracking, commentary, progress times, photos and video will be available from race start on www.coastalclassic.co.nz.


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