Archive for » September 25th, 2013«

43rd Annual Newport International Boat Show called a ‘rousing success’

Strong Attendance, Energetic Sales and a Positive Outlook Reported

Newport, R.I. – Newport Exhibition Group, owners and producers of the Newport International Boat Show, announced today that its 2013 Newport International Boat Show was a rousing success. Wrapping up its 43rd year, the show was held on September 12-15 and realized an 8% increase in paid attendance over the 2012 event with many exhibitors reporting strong sales.

“The Newport International Boat Show has always been a good show for us,” said Peter Haywood, CEO, of Winter Island Yacht Yard. “We definitely noticed an upswing in boat sales. Traffic to our Ranger Tugs display was strong throughout the show; we were busy from before the official opening until after hours. We left the show with a number of sales orders and a large number of strong prospects. As always, we are impressed with the exceptional attendees and staff that made the 2013 show the best yet.”

One of the largest boat shows in the country, dozens of new boat and boating products debuted at the Newport International Boat Shows. Attendees were able to view an exceptional assortment of power and sail boats ranging from 15 to 85 feet.

“The Greenline GL 40 is a ground-breaking boat and we are honored to receive the Newport for New Products award for the Best New Powerboat 30’ and Over category,” said Larry Russo, president and CEO, Russo Marine. “The new diesel, electric and solar powered yacht allows boaters to cruise without emissions or engine noise. It’s the first hybrid vessel to make an appearance in New England and the response we received from show attendees was beyond expectation.”

The Show’s charitable partner, Sailing Heals, offered on-the-water excursions for showgoers whose lives have been impacted by a terminal illness. On Sunday afternoon, show producers presented a check to the organization to help them continue their important mission. “We are so thankful to the Newport International Boat Show for choosing us as their charitable partner,” said Trisha Gallagher Boisvert, co-founder and executive director, Sailing Heals. “Not only will the generous donations help us with our mission, we were also able to raise awareness for our cause through our discussions with a large number of the thousands of people who came though the gates.”

“The 2013 Newport International Boat Show was a tremendous success,” said Tom Delotto, director of Newport Exhibition Group. “We saw a record number of new product introductions, attendance was its highest since 2007 and, based on the feedback from exhibitors, the quality of the traffic and level of sales was fantastic. We hope this is indicative of a truly great year ahead and continued strong market growth for the boating industry!”

Dates for next year’s Newport International Boat Show are September 11th through 14th, 2014. For more information on the Newport International Boat Show, please visit www.newportboatshow.com.


Similar news:

Sailing-Epic America's Cup to end with winner-take-all showdown

By Jonathan Weber

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept 25 (Reuters) – The 34th America’s Cup, which until a few weeks ago had looked like an economic and sporting fiasco, is set to end Wednesday with a high-speed, half hour, winner-take-all sailboat race between Oracle Team USA and Emirates Team New Zealand.

The unlikely climax comes after the Kiwi team opened up a seemingly insurmountable 8-1 lead in the final best-of-17 match-race series, then crumbled as Oracle won seven in a row to stand on the brink of one of the greatest comebacks in sports history.

“The exciting thing for me is seeing how this team has gelled together,” said Oracle skipper Jimmy Spithill after winning both races on Tuesday to tie things up with New Zealand. “Sometimes you need to face that barrel of the gun to come together. You can get wobbly in the knees or you can look into the barrel. Every day we’ve managed to step it up more.”

The thrilling on-the-water action over the past two weeks, with 72-foot catamarans flying across San Francisco Bay at speeds reaching 50 miles-per-hour, has largely vindicated the controversial decision to use big, high-tech boats in the competition for the oldest trophy in sports.

Never has the America’s Cup lasted so long or produced so many dramatic twists and turns, ranging from a fatal training accident that once threatened to scupper the competition altogether to a cheating scandal that forced Oracle to begin the final series two races in the hole. Were it not for the penalty, Oracle would have clinched the Cup on Tuesday.

A week ago, New Zealand fans had all but begun celebrating what seemed like an inevitable sporting and economic triumph for the sailing-crazed nation, which supported the team with about $30 million in government funds in the hopes of bringing the trophy – and attendant tourism and publicity – back home.

Oracle and its owner, Larry Ellison, were facing a humiliating defeat in a competition that it had radically reshaped after winning the Cup in 2010. Ellison and his team led by New Zealander Russell Coutts, who was responsible for the Kiwi’s Cup victories in 1995 and 2000, developed a new type of sailing event featuring the super-fast boats, state-of-the-art television coverage and scenic viewing areas along San Francisco Bay, all aimed at making sailing appealing to a wide audience.

With the home-team advantage and enough money to hire top sailors and build two equally matched boats to train against one another, Oracle was the presumptive favorite from the start. When only three challengers proved willing to take on the cost and complexity of the 72-foot carbon fiber yachts, Oracle’s chances looked even better–though it faced criticism that the dearth of competitors had made hosting the event a bad financial deal for San Francisco.

But the Kiwis, led by a 56-year-old managing director, Grant Dalton, who doubled as a workhorse onboard “grinder” during races, proved ingenious in developing their boat, particularly in pioneering the use of hydrofoils that lift both hulls almost entirely of the water to reduce drag.

Skipper Dean Barker steered nearly flawless races through most of the competition as New Zealand first crushed the Italian team, Luna Rossa, in the Louis Vuitton challenger series, and then dominated Oracle in the early races of the Cup finals.

“We’re going to prepare as we have been and we have confidence we can win this,” Barker said late Tuesday. “No one’s slightly head down or lacking in confidence. We know if we put the pieces together we’ll be successful.”

Oracle started two races behind as a punishment for illegal boat modifications in a preliminary regatta and its first-string wing trimmer was suspended for his involvement in that incident.

But to the astonishment of veteran America’s Cup observers, Oracle turned the tables. It replaced its tactician with Olympic champion Ben Ainslie, made changes to its boat that gave it more upwind speed and showed vastly improved tacking and teamwork as the racing progressed.

Event organizers barely contained their glee as the competition transformed from a display of bumbling that might keep yachting from becoming a major spectator sport into a tense, see-saw competition that showcased sailing’s athleticism, tactical judgments and innovative design.

More then one million spectators have passed through the two America’s Cup compounds on the waterfront.

Fans watching from the shore – or following state-of-the-art television coverage – have been treated to a little bit of everything: tense on-the-water duels, a near-capsize, repeated delays due to wind conditions, and even a whale that threatened to disrupt racing.

The TV coverage has itself been a triumph. Three helicopters and two speedboats equipped with motion-stabilizing equipment and have delivered gripping pictures, enhanced by sophisticated video graphics that helped make sense of it all for millions of viewers around the world. Each AC72 was equipped with multiple waterproof cameras and microphones to capture the action of the crew and the rush and spray of seawater.

For the city of San Francisco, where many residents have questioned the value of subsidizing what some deride as a rich man’s yacht race, the exciting regatta may also shift the dynamics.

There’s no guarantee that Ellison would choose to host the event in San Francisco again should his team complete its comeback win. But if he does, he may get a warmer welcome.


Similar news:

PWC sales approach 10% sales growth

September 24, 2013
Filed under News

Bucking a soft patch that began at the dawn of the year, PWC sales growth has edged solidly back into positive territory, approaching 10 percent sales growth year-over-year in August. Sales growth in the PWC category declined sharply at the end of 2012, bottoming out in early 2013. The news is according to the latest figures released from Info-Link Technologies.

Continuing improvement shown throughout the summer of 2013, sales of 15-foot or greater powerboats have shown their third consecutive, albeit slight, gain in year-over-year sales growth edging closer to 10-percent growth.

Ski boat sales growth continues at its recent growth rate, near 10 percent, which has held strong throughout most of 2012 and 2013. Ski boat sales growth has steadily increased for the past four years — a dramatic turnaround — and has remained at its current pace since the end of 2012.

Outboards continue showing very solid sales growth, which exceeded the 10-percent mark at the end of August. While sales growth in the outboard category dropped at the beginning of 2013, its growth has increased markedly every month since the start of the summer season.

The data is based on new U.S. boat registrations. Bellwether states are geographically dispersed states representing roughly half of the US boat market (which varies by market segment and time of year). Full graphs are available here: Info-Link Technologies Bellwether Report.


Similar news:

Sailing

And the man credited with the astonishing turnaround is British Olympic legend Ben Ainslie, who was drafted in to be the US team’s new tactician when they were trailing 4-1 and seemingly already doomed to defeat.

The stunning recovery for the team backed by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison continued on every front in perfect sailing conditions Tuesday. The US boat came from behind to win the second race easily and has now has seven straight victories, another Cup milestone.

New Zealand dominated that start for the first time in recent races, but then committed several tactical errors and Oracle stormed to a lead of nearly a minute at the finish.

In the first race the reeling Kiwi team drew a double-penalty as the two boats crossed the starting line, which allowed Oracle to jump to an insurmountable lead.

New Zealand once led the competition 8-1, and numerous Kiwi fans in San Francisco and back home in New Zealand were ready to celebrate victory in a gruelling two-year-long Cup campaign. The New Zealand government contributed about $30 million to the effort to bring the Cup back to the sailing-crazed nation.

But boat improvements, superior tactics and sharper sailing by Oracle have turned its fortunes around, evidenced in the second race Tuesday when the team appeared to show more speed on every leg of the race.

“I didn’t consider I would be racing in this event so it is a real bonus and privilege,” said Ainslie, who set up his own team earlier this year in order to challenge for the next America’s Cup.

But it seems that the four-times Olympic champion may get his hands on the trophy quicker than he ever imagined.

“I’m really excited about being out there, getting closer and closer to winning this event. I’m loving it.”

It’s not just the tactics of Ainslie and his fellow sailors that has led to the turnaround: improvements to the yacht have also been important, according to Oracle skipper Jimmy Spithill.

“We’ve been doing a lot of work at night with design engineering technicians,” Spithill said after the first race. “The boat is just going faster and faster and the boys are really starting to believe.”

New Zealand skipper Dean Barker acknowledged in comments after the races that Oracle was now faster on the upwind legs in heavier winds. New Zealand pioneered the so-called “foiling” in which the big boats lift almost completely out of the water and sail on small horizontal wings attached to their daggerboards and rudders, but Oracle is now doing it more effectively on the critical upwind leg.

“It’s the first time we’ve seen conditions where we were not as good as we needed to be,” said Barker.

Spithill had put on a brave face through the early losses, insisting that the event was “far from over” even when his team needed an implausible nine straight wins to keep the oldest trophy in sports. His bravado, backed by consistently shrewd manoeuvres at the start, has now been vindicated.

“There’s a huge wave of momentum we’ve been riding and it just builds and builds and builds,” Spithill said after Tuesday’s victories.

Barker sailed nearly flawlessly for much the summer as the Kiwis trounced Italian and Swedish challengers for the right to race Oracle. His dominance continued in the early races of the final as the Kiwis showed better speed upwind and much smoother tacking.

But the team has appeared to come apart in the face of the Oracle comeback and a run of bad luck that saw two races in which it was leading called off due to wind conditions.

The start of Tuesday’s first race featured classic match-racing drama. New Zealand miscalculated and bumped Oracle, which had the right of way, as it maneuvered to block its rival on the approach to the line.

The two 72-foot catamarans made contact again as they drifted across the line. A second foul was called on the Kiwis, which had stopped dead in the water as Oracle sped off to a large lead around the first mark.

New Zealand used textbook starting tactics in race two to get a solid lead around the first mark. But Oracle gained ground going downwind, and, after New Zealand mistimed a tack as the boats converged on the upwind leg, foiled past the Kiwis to open a big lead.

The regatta was supposed to be over on Saturday, but racing has been postponed several times for too much wind, not enough wind and wind from the wrong direction, dragging the event out into a third week. Rule changes lowered the wind limits after the Swedish team suffered a fatal training accident in May.

A two-race penalty against Oracle for illegal boat modifications in a preliminary regatta has also lengthened the competition. Oracle has actually won 10 races on the water, but only 8 of them count.

New Zealand yachting fans are now left to wonder whether Barker and his team can take a page from Oracle’s book and find a way to win with their backs to the wall.

“I’m struggling to keep positive. My faith in the team and Dean is being sorely tested. We’re only one (win) away, but my nerves are a bit like our chances, in tatters,” said Wellington office worker Will Christie.

Ellison skipped a keynote address at Oracle’s massive annual customer conference on Tuesday to be on San Francisco Bay as his team fought its way to the match point tie with the Kiwis.


Similar news:

43rd Annual Newport International Boat Show a rousing success

Strong Attendance, Energetic Sales and a Positive Outlook Reported

Newport, R.I. – Newport Exhibition Group, owners and producers of the Newport International Boat Show, announced today that its 2013 Newport International Boat Show was a rousing success. Wrapping up its 43rd year, the show was held on September 12-15 and realized an 8% increase in paid attendance over the 2012 event with many exhibitors reporting strong sales.

“The Newport International Boat Show has always been a good show for us,” said Peter Haywood, CEO, of Winter Island Yacht Yard. “We definitely noticed an upswing in boat sales. Traffic to our Ranger Tugs display was strong throughout the show; we were busy from before the official opening until after hours. We left the show with a number of sales orders and a large number of strong prospects. As always, we are impressed with the exceptional attendees and staff that made the 2013 show the best yet.”

One of the largest boat shows in the country, dozens of new boat and boating products debuted at the Newport International Boat Shows. Attendees were able to view an exceptional assortment of power and sail boats ranging from 15 to 85 feet.

“The Greenline GL 40 is a ground-breaking boat and we are honored to receive the Newport for New Products award for the Best New Powerboat 30’ and Over category,” said Larry Russo, president and CEO, Russo Marine. “The new diesel, electric and solar powered yacht allows boaters to cruise without emissions or engine noise. It’s the first hybrid vessel to make an appearance in New England and the response we received from show attendees was beyond expectation.”

The Show’s charitable partner, Sailing Heals, offered on-the-water excursions for showgoers whose lives have been impacted by a terminal illness. On Sunday afternoon, show producers presented a check to the organization to help them continue their important mission. “We are so thankful to the Newport International Boat Show for choosing us as their charitable partner,” said Trisha Gallagher Boisvert, co-founder and executive director, Sailing Heals. “Not only will the generous donations help us with our mission, we were also able to raise awareness for our cause through our discussions with a large number of the thousands of people who came though the gates.”

“The 2013 Newport International Boat Show was a tremendous success,” said Tom Delotto, director of Newport Exhibition Group. “We saw a record number of new product introductions, attendance was its highest since 2007 and, based on the feedback from exhibitors, the quality of the traffic and level of sales was fantastic. We hope this is indicative of a truly great year ahead and continued strong market growth for the boating industry!”

Dates for next year’s Newport International Boat Show are September 11th through 14th, 2014. For more information on the Newport International Boat Show, please visit www.newportboatshow.com.


Similar news:

Sailing

The stunning recovery for the team backed by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison continued on every front in perfect sailing conditions Tuesday. The U.S. boat came from behind to win the second race easily and has now has seven straight victories, another Cup milestone.

New Zealand dominated that start for the first time in recent races, but then committed several tactical errors and Oracle stormed to a lead of nearly a minute at the finish.

In the first race the reeling Kiwi team drew a double-penalty as the two boats crossed the starting line, which allowed Oracle to jump to an insurmountable lead.

New Zealand once led the competition 8-1, and numerous Kiwi fans in San Francisco and back home in New Zealand were ready to celebrate victory in a grueling two-year-long Cup campaign. The New Zealand government contributed about $30 million to the effort to bring the Cup back to the sailing-crazed nation.

But boat improvements, superior tactics and sharper sailing by Oracle have turned its fortunes around, evidenced in the second race Tuesday when the team appeared to show more speed on every leg of the race.

“We’ve been doing a lot of work at night with design engineering technicians,” Oracle skipper Jimmy Spithill said after the first race. “The boat is just going faster and faster and the boys are really starting to believe.”

New Zealand skipper Dean Barker acknowledged in comments after the races that Oracle was now faster on the upwind legs in heavier winds. New Zealand pioneered the so-called “foiling” in which the big boats lift almost completely out of the water and sail on small horizontal wings attached to their daggerboards and rudders, but Oracle is now doing it more effectively on the critical upwind leg.

“It’s the first time we’ve seen conditions where we were not as good as we needed to be,” said Barker.

Spithill had put on a brave face through the early losses, insisting that the event was “far from over” even when his team needed an implausible nine straight wins to keep the oldest trophy in sports. His bravado, backed by consistently shrewd maneuvers at the start, has now been vindicated.

“There’s a huge wave of momentum we’ve been riding and it just builds and builds and builds,” Spithill said after Tuesday’s victories.

Barker sailed nearly flawlessly for much the summer as the Kiwis trounced Italian and Swedish challengers for the right to race Oracle. His dominance continued in the early races of the final as the Kiwis showed better speed upwind and much smoother tacking.

But the team has appeared to come apart in the face of the Oracle comeback and a run of bad luck that saw two races in which it was leading called off due to wind conditions.

The start of Tuesday’s first race featured classic match-racing drama. New Zealand miscalculated and bumped Oracle, which had the right of way, as it maneuvered to block its rival on the approach to the line.

The two 72-foot catamarans made contact again as they drifted across the line. A second foul was called on the Kiwis, which had stopped dead in the water as Oracle sped off to a large lead around the first mark.

New Zealand used textbook starting tactics in race two to get a solid lead around the first mark. But Oracle gained ground going downwind, and, after New Zealand mistimed a tack as the boats converged on the upwind leg, foiled past the Kiwis to open a big lead.

The regatta was supposed to be over on Saturday, but racing has been postponed several times for too much wind, not enough wind and wind from the wrong direction, dragging the event out into a third week. Rule changes lowered the wind limits after the Swedish team suffered a fatal training accident in May.

A two-race penalty against Oracle for illegal boat modifications in a preliminary regatta has also lengthened the competition. Oracle has actually won 10 races on the water, but only 8 of them count.

New Zealand yachting fans are now left to wonder whether Barker and his team can take a page from Oracle’s book and find a way to win with their backs to the wall.

“I’m struggling to keep positive. My faith in the team and Dean is being sorely tested. We’re only one (win) away, but my nerves are a bit like our chances, in tatters,” said Wellington office worker Will Christie.

Ellison skipped a keynote address at Oracle’s massive annual customer conference on Tuesday to be on San Francisco Bay as his team fought its way to the match point tie with the Kiwis.


Similar news:

Boat sales see big gains in August

Boat sales see big gains in August


Posted on 24 September 2013


Share

The best summer days start warm and bright and you never want them to end. This summer, you couldn’t blame boatbuilders for hoping the season itself would linger, prolonging a rally that began in the heat of July and continued in August.

For the second month in a row, new-boat sales rose by double-digit percentages in the main powerboat segments and industrywide, helping builders continue a recovery from the effects of a cold, wet spring.

Led by aluminum pontoon and fishing boats and outboard fiberglass boats, sales in the main segments rose 11.8 percent in August, or 769 boats, to 7,286, from the same month in 2012 in 26 early-reporting states representing about 60 percent of the U.S. market, according to figures compiled by Statistical Surveys.

Statistical Surveys national marine sales manager Ryan Kloppe said the August report is further evidence of a boating season that bloomed late because summer weather was slow to arrive in many parts of the country.

“With no spring, people who wanted to buy a boat waited until it got warm and then went out and bought one,” he said.

Pontoon sales climbed 23.1 percent in August to 2,021 boats, giving the consistently popular category the highest percentage increase of any of the industry’s high-volume segments. Sales of aluminum fishing boats gained 12.4 percent, or 191, to 1,730, and sales of outboard fiberglass boats from 11 to 40 feet rose 9.6 percent, or 214, to 2,448.

Sales of 14- to 30-foot inboard and sterndrive fiberglass boats bucked the trend and continued to struggle. The segment saw sales fall 6 percent in August, or 59 boats, to 919.

Industrywide sales in the 26 states totaled 12,732, an increase of 12.8 percent, or 1,445 boats, from August 2012. Warm-weather states Florida and Texas were the best performers, reporting 1,989 and 1,977 sales, respectively, but Michigan ranked third with 922.

“Those are great numbers for the month of August for Michigan,” Kloppe said. “It’s a great boating state.”

California (856), North Carolina and New York (both with 657), Georgia (643), South Carolina (532), New Jersey (466) and Tennessee (445) rounded out the top 10 in sales for the month.

With 24 states and nearly half of the market yet to report, the industry has a chance to surpass its 50-state total for August 2012, when 17,984 boats were sold as the market continued a year-long recovery from the Great Recession.

Sales of 31- to 40-foot cruisers rose by 27 in August this year to 88 and sales of 41- to 62-foot yachts climbed by 21 to 69. Sales in the largest size category — custom and semicustom 63- to 99-foot yachts — fell by four to 11.

The Coast Guard was up to date in August on its reports of documented vessels, so the sales figures for boats larger than 31 feet were complete.

Sales of personal watercraft surged, rising by 18.5 percent, to 3,407 units, and ski-boat sales gained 8.9 percent to 430.

Sailboat sales rose by a single boat to 142.

For the year through August in the early-reporting states, sales were up 4 percent from a year earlier in the main segments, or 3,945 boats, at 101,694, and they were essentially flat industrywide — down 15 boats at 159,304.

Kloppe said he was pleased to see that overall sales have overcome the effects of the poor spring and caught up to their 2012 pace.

“Now we’ll see whether we can get some gains in the next few months,” he said.

— Jack Atzinger

Add your comment

Your name:

Required, screen names acceptable

Your email:

Required, will not be published

Comments are moderated and generally will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive. For more information, please see our Comments Policy.:

 

Word verification:


<!–

If you would like to use this article on your website, please contact us.

–>


Similar news:

Sailing-U.S. boat pulls even in historic America's Cup comeback

By Jonathan Weber and Alden Bentley

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 24 (Reuters) – Oracle Team USA won two more races against Emirates Team New Zealand to even up the America’s Cup finals on Tuesday, continuing an epic comeback in a regatta that once looked like a Kiwi cakewalk and will now be decided by a single winner-take-all showdown.

The deciding race in what will be the longest America’s Cup in its 162-year history is scheduled for Wednesday.

The stunning recovery for the team backed by Oracle co-founder Larry Ellison continued on every front in perfect sailing conditions Tuesday. The U.S. boat came from behind to win the second race easily and has now has seven straight victories, another Cup milestone.

New Zealand dominated that start for the first time in recent races, but then committed several tactical errors and Oracle stormed to a lead of nearly a minute at the finish.

In the first race the reeling Kiwi team drew a double-penalty as the two boats crossed the starting line, which allowed Oracle to jump to an insurmountable lead.

New Zealand once led the competition 8-1, and numerous Kiwi fans in San Francisco and back home in New Zealand were ready to celebrate victory in a grueling two-year-long Cup campaign. The New Zealand government contributed about $30 million to the effort to bring the Cup back to the sailing-crazed nation.

But boat improvements, superior tactics and sharper sailing by Oracle have turned its fortunes around, evidenced in the second race Tuesday when the team appeared to show more speed on every leg of the race.

“We’ve been doing a lot of work at night with design engineering technicians,” Oracle skipper Jimmy Spithill said after the first race. “The boat is just going faster and faster and the boys are really starting to believe.”

New Zealand skipper Dean Barker acknowledged in comments after the races that Oracle was now faster on the upwind legs in heavier winds. New Zealand pioneered the so-called “foiling” in which the big boats lift almost completely out of the water and sail on small horizontal wings attached to their daggerboards and rudders, but Oracle is now doing it more effectively on the critical upwind leg.

“It’s the first time we’ve seen conditions where we were not as good as we needed to be,” said Barker.

Spithill had put on a brave face through the early losses, insisting that the event was “far from over” even when his team needed an implausible nine straight wins to keep the oldest trophy in sports. His bravado, backed by consistently shrewd maneuvers at the start, has now been vindicated.

“There’s a huge wave of momentum we’ve been riding and it just builds and builds and builds,” Spithill said after Tuesday’s victories.

Barker sailed nearly flawlessly for much the summer as the Kiwis trounced Italian and Swedish challengers for the right to race Oracle. His dominance continued in the early races of the final as the Kiwis showed better speed upwind and much smoother tacking.

But the team has appeared to come apart in the face of the Oracle comeback and a run of bad luck that saw two races in which it was leading called off due to wind conditions.

The start of Tuesday’s first race featured classic match-racing drama. New Zealand miscalculated and bumped Oracle, which had the right of way, as it maneuvered to block its rival on the approach to the line.

The two 72-foot catamarans made contact again as they drifted across the line. A second foul was called on the Kiwis, which had stopped dead in the water as Oracle sped off to a large lead around the first mark.

New Zealand used textbook starting tactics in race two to get a solid lead around the first mark. But Oracle gained ground going downwind, and, after New Zealand mistimed a tack as the boats converged on the upwind leg, foiled past the Kiwis to open a big lead.

The regatta was supposed to be over on Saturday, but racing has been postponed several times for too much wind, not enough wind and wind from the wrong direction, dragging the event out into a third week. Rule changes lowered the wind limits after the Swedish team suffered a fatal training accident in May.

A two-race penalty against Oracle for illegal boat modifications in a preliminary regatta has also lengthened the competition. Oracle has actually won 10 races on the water, but only 8 of them count.

New Zealand yachting fans are now left to wonder whether Barker and his team can take a page from Oracle’s book and find a way to win with their backs to the wall.

“I’m struggling to keep positive. My faith in the team and Dean is being sorely tested. We’re only one (win) away, but my nerves are a bit like our chances, in tatters,” said Wellington office worker Will Christie.

Ellison skipped a keynote address at Oracle’s massive annual customer conference on Tuesday to be on San Francisco Bay as his team fought its way to the match point tie with the Kiwis.


Similar news: