Archive for » May, 2013 «

Stuart Yacht Sales opens brokerage office near Sunset Bay Marina


Stuart Yacht Sales announces the opening of a second staffed brokerage office in Stuart at 602 SW Anchorage Way.

It will be open seven days a week.

Andy Andreoli will be staffing the office along with Andy Lowe, who will be moving in from the Port Salerno office. The new facility includes eight boat slips that are right next to the Sunset Bay Marina and able to accommodate 50-foot vessels with a draft of up to 5 feet, according to owner and president Bill Watson.

For more information, call 772-283-9400; visit www.StuartYachtSales.com or email SYS@StuartYachtSales.com.


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Sailing

Grant Dalton, managing director of Emirates Team New Zealand, told Reuters on Thursday that he supported new safety rules put forward last week by event organizers. But he dismissed suggestions by some sailors, including members of the Artemis Racing team that suffered the accident, that big changes such as smaller sails or power-assisted on-board controls were necessary.

“That’s not going to happen. That’s a fundamental change to systems that if they couldn’t get right in the first place, that’s their problem,” Dalton said before heading out for a practice session on San Francisco Bay.

Artemis’ 72-foot (22-metre) catamaran capsized and broke apart on May 9 during a training session and killed British Olympian Andrew Simpson, who was trapped under the wreckage. The accident raised questions about the fundamental soundness of the huge, lightweight boats, which can reach speeds of close to 50 miles per hour (80 kmh).

Software mogul Larry Ellison won the cup in 2010, and the defending champion is entitled to choose the venue and set the rules for the next competition. Ellison and his sailing team hoped the big, fast boats, called AC72s, would boost interest in the event, but their cost and complexity kept some competitors away, and only four teams are competing for the trophy.

The competition is scheduled to kick off in July and culminate in a final match in September.

Dalton and his team, which arrived in San Francisco earlier in May, are prepping eagerly for the competition. Emirates Team New Zealand and Oracle Team USA were both blazing around San Francisco Bay in moderate winds on Thursday, practicing their turns, monitoring boat performance and spying on one another.

REGATTA IN FLUX

The new safety rules include lower wind limits for racing, improved personal safety gear for sailors and reducing the number of qualifying races to allow more time for boat maintenance.

Sweden’s Artemis, which has a second boat that it has yet to sail in San Francisco Bay, has said it may not compete if its sailors feel the rule changes are insufficient. The fourth team in the competition, Italy’s Luna Rossa, has also expressed serious concerns about safety and has declined to comment on whether it considers the new rules sufficient.

The New Zealand team designed and built its AC72 specifically to withstand the strong gusts and currents of San Francisco Bay, Dalton said. Making significant rule changes now that require altering the boats would be unfair, he said.

“Anything that increases the safety for the guys on board is a good thing. If it doesn’t benefit one team over another then we’re in favor of that,” he said.

Still, he warned that the big catamarans, which use hard “wing” sails and are estimated to cost $8 million to build, are inherently difficult to make and sail.

“As Artemis has shown, if you get this engineered wrong – and it’s not hard, we could have yet, we just haven’t seen that boundary – they just disintegrate,” he said.

Dalton said the carbon-fiber boats have shown themselves to be a poor choice for the cup races.

“Much of this is a folly. There’s nothing more easily seen than that there are only three teams (challenging Oracle), now sort of two and a half teams,” Dalton said.


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Legislation would give vehicle buyers a tax break for trade-in of car, boat

LANSING — It’s a decades-old issue for car and boat buyers in Michigan: You want to buy something new and use your older model as a trade-in.

However, when the final bill is tallied, you end up paying sales tax on the full amount of the new purchase with no credit for the trade-in. So, someone who uses a $5,000 trade-in vehicle to buy a $15,000 car pays 6% sales tax on the full $15,000, despite the fact they only pay the dealer $10,000.

That is seemingly about to change, thanks to legislation nearing final passage at the state Capitol.

Under a bill that passed the House Tax Policy Committee on Wednesday, the buyer would only pay sales tax on the adjusted $10,000 price, saving $300 in sales taxes. The savings are even greater when pricey boats or recreational vehicles are involved.

The change would apply to new or used vehicle purchases.

The committee also approved two similar bills that had already passed the Senate.

Lawmakers would phase in the change to soften the estimated $134-million hit on the state Treasury, about $98 million of which would impact the School Aid Fund.

Michigan is one of about seven states that do not give buyers some form of a sales tax break on the value of a trade-in vehicle or boat.

“We’re the motor capital of the world; we shouldn’t be penalizing people buying cars,” said Frank Tucci, a sales associate at Southfield Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram on Telegraph who wrote to his state lawmaker about the issue several years ago.

The present tax policy is “like double taxation because they already paid tax on the vehicle they are trading in when they purchased it,” Tucci said.

Similar legislation stalled last year amid concerns about the impact on the state budget.

But the state’s revenue picture has improved since then.

State Rep. Andrea LaFontaine, R-Columbus Township, the sponsor of HB 4234, said her proposed six-year phase-in is drawing support from lawmakers who said no last time. The Senate version, sponsored by Sen. David Robertson, R-Grand Blanc, proposes a 10-year phase-in.

“I’m optimistic” some version of the sales tax relief will pass the Legislature, LaFontaine said.

School and local government groups such as the Michigan Municipal League oppose the change because the state hasn’t specified how the sales tax revenue they receive would be replaced.

On Wednesday, Rep. Jon Switalski, D-Warren, proposed an amendment requiring lost school revenues to be replaced from the state’s general fund. It was defeated 8-5 on a party-line vote. After the amendment failed, Democrats supported the bills’ unanimous passage to the full House.

It wasn’t clear Wednesday when the House will take up the issue.

Greg Arceri of Northville, a retired Ford worker, said he can see the issue from both sides. It seems more fair to consumers to only pay sales tax on the difference in value between the purchased vehicle and the trade-in, he said.

On the other hand, “we’re not out of the woods yet” economically, and he’s concerned about losing tax revenues that could be spent on schools and roads.

“There are a lot of other taxes that people feel are unfair, but they’re there for a reason,” Arceri said.

Terry Burns, executive vice president of the Michigan Automobile Dealers Association, said buyers can use what they save on sales tax to make larger down payments or to buy fuel.

“It is a direct consumer tax break at the point of sale, which is pretty exciting,” Burns said.


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Why do so many NZers own a boat but rarely take it to sea?

New Zealand claims to have more boats per head of population than any other country in the world. In Auckland alone, nearly one adult in eleven owns a boat. Surprisingly though, as Matt Vance reveals in his coming book How to Sail a Boat, the vast majority never take them out to sea.

‘Ninety percent of boats are rarely, if ever, sailed. Some are taken out of the water for servicing once every year or two, and spend the rest of the time sitting forlornly on their moorings. Others do not seem to have moved for years,’ he observes of the boats moored in the Banks Peninsula bay that is home to his own yacht, Siward.

Vance, a writer, artist and filmmaker specialising in the South Pacific, Southern Ocean and Antarctica, notes that the ten percent of boats that do hit the water have two very different sorts of owners – tinkerers and sailors.

‘The tinkerers don’t enjoy sailing but enjoy boats,’ he writes. ‘They keep their boats in immaculate condition. “You could eat your dinner off that” is an expression you will often hear of their handiwork. They love getting lost in the detail of diesel engine installation and the labyrinth of electronic gadgetry that their boats seem to propagate.’

The true sailors are ‘distinguished by their ability to handle their boats under sail and to have been over the horizon in them. Their boats are in working condition, well-loved and sailed, but you probably could not eat your dinner off them.’

Vance, himself a passionate sailor, stirs the blood with stories of ocean racing and South Pacific cruising, and reprises the fascinating stories of some solo sailors who have lost the plot while at sea.

How to Sail a Boat is the thirteenth book in Awa Press’s much admired Ginger Series, which also includes Justin Paton’s How to Look at a Painting and Steve Braunias’s How to Watch a Bird, both of which have gone on to become TV series.


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Sailing and Impressionist art at SF's Legion of Honor

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco is opening an exhibition titled ‘Impressionists on the Water’, which is deeply tied to the physical and cultural landscape of the Bay Area. Impressionists on the Water has been organized in conjunction with America’s Cup and offers a complement to this summer’s races on the Bay. It will be at the Legion of Honor until October 13th, 2013.

This exhibition celebrates the French Impressionists’ fascination with recreational and competitive sailing, a developing sport in 19th century France. Select highlights from the Museums’ permanent collection will be joined at the Legion of Honor with key loans from the Musée d’Orsay, Paris; the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC; the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm; and the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands, among other notable institutions.

Artists featured in Impressionists on the Water often had significant experience with sailing and other water sports; Gustave Caillebotte was a talented boat designer and builder, Claude Monet painted aboard a floating boat studio, and Paul Signac sailed the coasts of Europe extensively in the roughly 30 boats he owned during his lifetime. These artists’ hands-on experience lends many of the paintings and works on paper in this exhibition a precise level of detail and an evident sense of practical knowledge of sailing, yachting, and rowing.

Impressionists on the Water features approximately 85 works by Pre-Impressionists, Impressionists, and Post-Impressionists, including Charles-François Daubigny, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Gustave Caillebotte, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, Georges Seurat, Paul Signac, Théophile van Rysselberghe, Pierre Bonnard, and others. The exhibition also includes two boats and six boat models that further demonstrate the important role sailing, rowing, and yachting played in the social and artistic contexts of 19th-century France.

For more information visit LegionOfHonor.famsf.org.


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BYM Product and Industry News


Boat Trader (advertising the widest selection of boats for sale in the U.S) and its sister company boats.com (the global online resource for boat enthusiasts to explore, discover, manage and share information on a single website), have announced their partnership with Statistical Surveys to provide boat dealers with timely, actionable information on local boat sales.

The partnership provides dealers with localized competitive sales data through the Dealer Analysis Report.  Available by subscription only, the Statistical Surveys Dealer Analysis Report gives dealers a detailed snapshot of current sold boats data in the counties in which they compete. Dealers can choose to receive data from over 14 segments of boats in up to 25 counties. Detailed reports, sorted by length, make, model, and zip code, are delivered on either a monthly or quarterly basis.

“This type of sales data has never been available to dealers on such a focused, localized, and regular basis before,” said Kirsteen Lankford, director of sales, Boat Trader and boats.com.  “It allows dealers to know exactly what inventory is moving in their market, and when.  This data gives dealers the knowledge to make smarter inventory and purchasing decisions. We are excited to partner with Statistical Surveys as we share the common goal of improving the efficiency of the boating industry.”

“Statistical Surveys, Inc. is excited to partner with Dominion Marine Media representing the Dealer Analysis Report,” said Ryan Kloppe, National Marine Sales Manager with Statistical Surveys, Inc. “While Statistical Surveys has been the proven leader in providing this type of data for many years, our partnership with Boat Trader and boats.com enables more dealers to have access to the business intelligence we provide.”

About Statistical Surveys

Statistical Surveys is a premier provider of market intelligence to the Marine, Manufactured Housing, RV-Motorized and RV-Towable Industries. Founded in 1958, we have created the world’s largest number of market share data reports, and our capabilities are unprecedented in terms of cost, depth, breadth, and accuracy. We have established strong, long-standing relationships with industry leaders and understand the intimate details of each industry we serve, enabling us to spot emerging trends in the data. A privately held firm, Statistical Surveys is based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Our mission statement is simple: We are dedicated to compiling the most accurate data for our customers in the most efficient and timely manner possible. 

Last Updated ( Thursday, 30 May 2013 )


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Live updates

4:29 am, Thu 23 May 2013

Sailing experts’ bid to increase safety in America’s Cup

Thirty seven recommendations to increase safety in the America’s Cup by sailing experts, following the death of British Olympic sailing champion Andrew Simpson.

The group, led by regatta director Iain Murray, unveiled proposals nearly two weeks after a training run turned deadly.

Olympic gold medal-winning sailor Andrew Simpson Credit: Chris Ison/PA Wire

Suggestions included quipping crews with body armour, high-visibility helmets, and hands-free breathing apparatus.

Thirty-six-year-old Simpson, nicknamed Bart, died trapped underneath his Artemis Racing AC72 catamaran after the vessel overturned in San Francisco Bay on May 9.

  • UK
  • America’s Cup
  • Sailing

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Boat Trader and Boats.com partner with Statistical Surveys to provide dealers …

Dominion Marine Media
May 30, 2013
Filed under News

Norfolk, VA – (May 30, 2013) – Boat Trader (advertising the widest selection of boats for sale in the U.S) and its sister company boats.com (the global online resource for boat enthusiasts to explore, discover, manage and share information on a single website), have announced their partnership with Statistical Surveys to provide boat dealers with timely, actionable information on local boat sales.

The partnership provides dealers with localized competitive sales data through the Dealer Analysis Report.  Available by subscription only, the Statistical Surveys Dealer Analysis Report gives dealers a detailed snapshot of current sold boats data in the counties in which they compete. Dealers can choose to receive data from over 14 segments of boats in up to 25 counties. Detailed reports, sorted by length, make, model, and zip code, are delivered on either a monthly or quarterly basis.

“This type of sales data has never been available to dealers on such a focused, localized, and regular basis before,” said Kirsteen Lankford, director of sales, Boat Trader and boats.com.  “It allows dealers to know exactly what inventory is moving in their market, and when.  This data gives dealers the knowledge to make smarter inventory and purchasing decisions. We are excited to partner with Statistical Surveys as we share the common goal of improving the efficiency of the boating industry.”

“Statistical Surveys, Inc. is excited to partner with Dominion Marine Media representing the Dealer Analysis Report,” said Ryan Kloppe, National Marine Sales Manager with Statistical Surveys, Inc. “While Statistical Surveys has been the proven leader in providing this type of data for many years, our partnership with Boat Trader and boats.com enables more dealers to have access to the business intelligence we provide.”

Subscriptions to customized Dealer Analysis Reports are available now by contacting the Boat Trader and boats.com Account Management teams at 866-982-6287.

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Legislation aims to cut tax on car, boat sales in Michigan by calculating …

LANSING, Michigan — Michigan residents would pay a lower sales tax when they trade in cars or boats under legislation under consideration in Lansing.

Under a bill that passed the House Tax Policy Committee on Wednesday, the Detroit Free Press reports (http://on.freep.com/10JTjAd ) the buyer would only pay sales tax on an adjusted price, saving potentially hundreds of dollars in taxes. The savings would be greater on more expensive vehicles.

Currently, people end up paying sales tax on the full amount of the new purchase with no credit for the trade-in

The change would apply to new or used vehicle purchases. The committee also approved two similar bills that had already passed the state Senate.

One aim of the effort is to boost sales, especially in border counties.


Online:

House Bill 4234: http://1.usa.gov/10K7Zzp


Information from: Detroit Free Press, http://www.freep.com


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Boat Trader and Boats.com Partner with Statistical Surveys to Provide Boat …

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This type of sales data has never been available to dealers on such a focused, localized and regular basis before.

Norfolk, VA (PRWEB) May 30, 2013

Boat Trader (advertising the widest selection of boats for sale in the U.S) and its sister company boats.com (the global online resource for boat enthusiasts to explore, discover, manage and share information on a single website), have announced their partnership with Statistical Surveys to provide boat dealers with timely, actionable information on local boat sales.

The partnership provides dealers with localized competitive sales data through the Dealer Analysis Report. Available by subscription only, the Statistical Surveys Dealer Analysis Report gives dealers a detailed snapshot of current sold boats data in the counties in which they compete. Dealers can choose to receive data from over 14 segments of boats in up to 25 counties. Detailed reports, sorted by length, make, model, and zip code, are delivered on either a monthly or quarterly basis.

“This type of sales data has never been available to dealers on such a focused, localized, and regular basis before,” said Kirsteen Lankford, director of sales, Boat Trader and boats.com. “It allows dealers to know exactly what inventory is moving in their market, and when. This data gives dealers the knowledge to make smarter inventory and purchasing decisions. We are excited to partner with Statistical Surveys as we share the common goal of improving the efficiency of the boating industry.”

“Statistical Surveys, Inc. is excited to partner with Dominion Marine Media representing the Dealer Analysis Report,” said Ryan Kloppe, National Marine Sales Manager with Statistical Surveys, Inc. “While Statistical Surveys has been the proven leader in providing this type of data for many years, our partnership with Boat Trader and boats.com enables more dealers to have access to the business intelligence we provide.”

Subscriptions to customized Dealer Analysis Reports are available now by contacting the Boat Trader and boats.com Account Management teams at 866-982-6287.

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