Archive for » March 25th, 2013«

BRUNSWICK CORPORATION : Crestliner Announces Additions to Extensive … – 4

03/25/2013| 04:32pm US/Eastern

Little Falls, Minn. – March 25, 2013 – At Crestliner, it’s our goal to provide our customers with the highest quality boats that suit the many ways they enjoy the water.  We also strive to provide a strong network of local, reliable dealers whom our customers can trust with their boat purchase and maintenance.  

Crestliner is excited to announce the addition of five new dealers to its growing network of elite Crestliner dealerships.  They are:

George Fuller’s Marine Machine, Inc., Bayville, N.J.
George Fuller’s Marine is a family owned and operated full service marine facility, specializing in outboard engine rebuilding, machine work and all aspects of spring launches and winterization services. They pride themselves on delivering the utmost in customer service and consistently maintaining a 100% customer service rating with their engine and boat companies, as well as achieving numerous Customer Service Awards consistently throughout the years.  

Eastside Motors, Inc., Louisville, Miss.
Eastside Motors has been in the marine industry since 1983, providing sales and repair services for marine and outdoor power equipment.  They pride themselves on their customer service and strive to treat every boat as if it were their own.  They offer 14,000 square feet of indoor showroom, repair and storage space, guaranteeing your boat is safe from the outside elements.

Discovery Motorsports, Humboldt, SK, Canada
Offering four seasons of exhilarating outdoor adventure, Discovery Motorsports’ experienced sales staff is eager to share its knowledge and enthusiasm with you. They are proud to serve the Humboldt area for all your outdoor needs, including fishing boats, lawn mowers, trailers, snowmobiles and ATVs.  In addition, they have factory trained service personnel and carry an extensive line-up of accessories to outfit you and your machine to make your outdoor recreation experience one to remember.

Hall Marine of Greenville, Greenville, S.C.
Hall Marine of Greenville is your full service boat dealer.  They have a large modern indoor facility featuring over 40 boats in their showroom. Hall Marine of Greenville is your one-stop location for all of your boating needs; including a professional sales and brokerage department with an experienced staff, ready to assist you.   Their service department with factory trained and certified technicians, is experienced in delivering a high quality level of marine repair services and winterization.

Nisswa Marine, Nisswa, Minn.
Nisswa Marine was founded on the shores of Nisswa Lake in the late 1930s. They’ve seen many trends come and go, but there’s one thing that hasn’t changed – their passion for boating.
Providing quality boats and accessories for everyone from the serious fisherman to the recreational boater, Nisswa Marine has been helping people just like you enjoy the water for over 70 years.

Our customers can find their nearest dealer by visiting www.Crestliner.com.

About Crestliner
Located in Little Falls, Minn., Crestliner celebrates over 65 years in business and traces its origins to the Aluminum Boat Company that came to life within the walls of an airplane hanger back in 1946. The company’s unparalleled commitment to premium boats is reflected in outstanding durability, superior welded construction and exceptional performance that enhance all the consumer’s boating activities. A testament to our quality craftsmanship, Crestliner has received the CSI Award of Excellence in Customer Satisfaction for Aluminum Outboard Boats for the fifth consecutive year. Learn more about Crestliner and its line of boats by visiting www.crestliner.com.

Crestliner is a division of Brunswick Corporation, a leader in the recreational marine industry.  www.brunswick.com

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Busy days at eighth annual Great Upstate Boat Show – Glens Falls Post

QUEENSBURY — The debut of a solar-powered boat, stairs made for boating canines and close to 200 vessels were on display for browsing boat lovers at the eighth annual Great Upstate Boat Show this weekend.

Every time a dealer reported selling a boat, a bell was rung and an announcement made at the Adirondack Sports Complex, a more common event than during the shows a couple years ago.

“We certainly felt it, we lost a few dealers,” said Roger Phinney, executive director of the Eastern New York Marine Trades Association, of the recession. “But gradually now, things are beginning to loosen up.”

The number of sales made at the show hadn’t been totaled as this year’s run wrapped up Sunday afternoon, but Phinney estimated attendance was up about 20 percent from last year. And many people use the boat show as an opportunity to shop around and compare prices online, but dealers make sales after the show to people they meet there.

“A lot of people come to boat shows to do their homework,” said Derek Nagengast, of Shady Harbor Marina, based in New Baltimore. “Some people wait until after the show to purchase anything.”

Each year, organizaers attempt to stay on top of trends, and try to bring new offerings to the show. This year, Tamarack Lake Electric Boat Company debuted its new solar-assisted electric boat at the show, which is manufactured in Rome, N.Y. The 22-foot pontoon boat, called the Solar-Powered Loon, attracted a lot of attention at its first public appearance, company President Monte Gisborne said.

“Pontoon boats are really about providing the opportunity to get together and converse,” Gisborne said. “On this boat, you don’t have a screaming engine.”

Gisborne bought an electric boat years ago, and loved it but it was small. He started thinking about a larger boat, and at that point decided “why not put a solar panel on it?” he said.

He did, and took his family on a trip through the New York state canal system, becoming the first people to travel across the state in a solar-powered boat in 2007, he said.

“When do you go boating? When it’s sunny. It just made sense to use the sun,” Gisborne said. “It’s like a cross between sailing and gas-powered boating because it relies on what Mother Nature gives us, but you can point it and shoot in one direction.”

Organizers have tried to brand the weekend-long boat show as “the place to come” for boaters. It combines some of the old stand-bys with new things every year, and new boats, lighting systems that illuminate the boat from underneath and life vests and stairs to aid swimming dogs back into a boat.

It is held annually at the end of March because it is a time when many people are starting to think about boating season again. This year’s show filled the sports complex with 173 boats and 12 other personal water crafts. One dealer reported Sunday morning that his goal was to sell 30 boats and he was close to that, with the entire last day of the show to go, Phinney said.

“The atmosphere is certainly encouraging,” Phinney said.


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Busy days at annual boat show – Glens Falls Post

QUEENSBURY — The debut of a solar-powered boat, stairs made for boating canines and close to 200 vessels were on display for browsing boat lovers at the eighth annual Great Upstate Boat Show this weekend.

Every time a dealer reported selling a boat, a bell was rung and an announcement made at the Adirondack Sports Complex, a more common event than during the shows a couple years ago.

“We certainly felt it, we lost a few dealers,” said Roger Phinney, executive director of the Eastern New York Marine Trades Association, of the recession. “But gradually now, things are beginning to loosen up.”

The number of sales made at the show hadn’t been totaled as this year’s run wrapped up Sunday afternoon, but Phinney estimated attendance was up about 20 percent from last year. And many people use the boat show as an opportunity to shop around and compare prices online, but dealers make sales after the show to people they meet there.

“A lot of people come to boat shows to do their homework,” said Derek Nagengast, of Shady Harbor Marina, based in New Baltimore. “Some people wait until after the show to purchase anything.”

Each year, organizaers attempt to stay on top of trends, and try to bring new offerings to the show. This year, Tamarack Lake Electric Boat Company debuted its new solar-assisted electric boat at the show, which is manufactured in Rome, N.Y. The 22-foot pontoon boat, called the Solar-Powered Loon, attracted a lot of attention at its first public appearance, company President Monte Gisborne said.

“Pontoon boats are really about providing the opportunity to get together and converse,” Gisborne said. “On this boat, you don’t have a screaming engine.”

Gisborne bought an electric boat years ago, and loved it but it was small. He started thinking about a larger boat, and at that point decided “why not put a solar panel on it?” he said.

He did, and took his family on a trip through the New York state canal system, becoming the first people to travel across the state in a solar-powered boat in 2007, he said.

“When do you go boating? When it’s sunny. It just made sense to use the sun,” Gisborne said. “It’s like a cross between sailing and gas-powered boating because it relies on what Mother Nature gives us, but you can point it and shoot in one direction.”

Organizers have tried to brand the weekend-long boat show as “the place to come” for boaters. It combines some of the old stand-bys with new things every year, and new boats, lighting systems that illuminate the boat from underneath and life vests and stairs to aid swimming dogs back into a boat.

It is held annually at the end of March because it is a time when many people are starting to think about boating season again. This year’s show filled the sports complex with 173 boats and 12 other personal water crafts. One dealer reported Sunday morning that his goal was to sell 30 boats and he was close to that, with the entire last day of the show to go, Phinney said.

“The atmosphere is certainly encouraging,” Phinney said.


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