Archive for » December, 2012 «

Boat sales up nationally, locally

Sunday, December 30, 2012

By Robert Silk Citizen Staff

The sale of new powerboats, which plummeted nationwide during the mortgage crisis and recession, began to rebound this year, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

“We are anticipating new powerboat sales to be up 10 percent in 2012,” association spokeswoman Ellen Hopkins said last week. The trade organization won’t issue its official year-end 2012 report until next May. But Hopkins said that sales reports from members, as well as statistical surveys, led to the encouraging estimate.

Powerboats that can be used for multi-purpose recreation, including pontoon boats and small cruisers, are leading the uptick.

“It’s the versatile boat that seems to be working well,” Hopkins said. “We think one of the reasons is that when you’re spending time outdoors, you’d like to do a variety of activities.”

Most of the sales increase is coming from boats in the 15- to 26-foot range, she added.

Some local boat vendors are feeling the surge.

“We’re 50 percent above expectations,” said Mike Martin, owner of Riva South Motorsports in Key Largo, which began selling small and midsize powerboats in the summer of 2011.

Riva South has had its most success selling 12- to 23-foot center-consoles made by Carolina Skiff, Martin said. Hybrids, featuring a pontoon top but a V-shaped fiberglass hull, have also done well.

“I think you’re going to see another increase next year,” Martin said. “I’m looking forward to it.”

Carl Hansen, general manager of Boats Direct USA in Key Largo, said new boat sales were up there as well this year.

“We had a good steady stream of traffic. We stayed busy during the typical slump times,” he said.

But Hansen said that things have slowed down in November and December. He attributes the drop to the re-election of President Obama, which he said has left wealthy boat buyers concerned about potential tax increases.

According to Hopkins, approximately 300,000 new powerboats sold nationwide in 2006 and 2007. Then the bottom dropped out, with the number of sales dropping to 208,000 in 2008, 157,000 in 2009 and 142,000 in 2010. The bleeding stopped last year, with new powerboat sales remaining essentially flat.

Meanwhile, 34.8 percent of American adults boated recreationally at least once in 2011, according to trade group, the highest percentage since 1997.

If powerboat sales do turn out to have increased 10 percent this year, it will bring sales numbers near 2009 levels, which is still just over half of the pre-recession total.

The health of the economy, Hopkins said, will be a major factor in determining if the upward trend continues.

“Certainly, it’s the first big bump we’ve seen,” she said.

rsilk@keysnews.com


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Goldfinger set for sailing treble

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Bluenose Yachts Sparkman Stephens 30 Wins SAILING WORLD Magazine …

SAILING WORLD magazine just awarded Bluenose Yachts SS 30 the Boat of the Year for 2013 in the daysailing category. A panel of experienced judges were overwhelmed by the Sparkman Stephens 30 stating she was “untouchable.”

Newport, Rhode Island (PRWEB) December 28, 2012

Bluenose Yacht Sales with sales offices in Newport, Rhode Island, and South Portland, Maine was recently awarded Boat of the Year 2013 by SAILING WORLD magazine for its entry of the Sparkman Stephens 30. Claimed by the judges to be “untouchable” compared to the other entrants, the SS 30 has again demonstrated why Olin Stephens was such a master of yacht design. The SS 30, originally designed in 1935 was named “BABE” and went on to win several on and off-shore races in Florida. The Sparkman Stephens design team, headed by Brendan Abbott helped Olin realize one of his last requests by reintroducing the new “BABE” with a modern underbody, well engineered construction plans and incorporating efficient boat building technology.

The Sparkman Stephens 30 was launched in September 2012 and participated in the Newport Boat Show and the Annapolis Boat show with great success and will be available for showings at the New England Boat show in Feb. 2013.

Bluenose Yacht Sales, one of New England’s leading broker dealers for used yachts as well as representing Beneteau Group’s Jeanneau and CNB Bordeaux 60 brands combined with the new SS 30, Grand Soleil, Cabo Rico, and the E33, is honored by this award from one of the leading sailing magazines in the United States. In 2012, the Jeanneau 379 won a similar award from Cruising World magazine and as a Jeanneau dealer, Bluenose Yacht Sales has continued to be a leading New England yacht dealer due to excellence in service and customer support.

The Sparkman Stephens 30 is being distributed world wide by Bluenose Yachts and they are excited about an expanding dealer network including Europe for 2013. This Boat of the Year award combined with the recent SAIL magazine glowing review affirms all of the reasons why Rhode Island remains one of the best locations for design, engineering and construction of this new award winning, beautiful daysailor.

Bluenose Yacht Sales with offices located in Newport, RI and Portland, Maine serves each client with personal attention to understand your preferences, experience and intended use in order to find the right fit that will deliver years of fun and yacht excitement for friends and family. BYS is committed to “Excellence with Integrity” and long term client relationships rather than excessive size that can compromise quality of service.

Call BYS to discuss their brands or to explore how they might add value to assist your new or brokerage yacht purchase. BYS welcomes new listings where their marketing and sales experience can make a meaningful difference.

Call – 877 – 695 – 6538.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/12/prweb10275642.htm


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Sailing: Irish to the fore as 'Wild Oats' demolishes own record

Irish sailors in Australia have been on a roll in the annual 628-mile Rolex Sydney Hobart Race, with major input into the crewing of the two top boats.

After a virtually perfect race in tactical and navigational terms, veteran owner Bob Oatley’s 100-footer Wild Oats XI took line honours, and, in doing so, knocked 16 minutes off the course record she established in 2005.

As Oatley’s team – headed by skipper Mark Richards – constantly update and retune the big boat, the Wild Oats which established the record yesterday was a very different beast from the winner of 2005.

But the course they had to sail was the same challenging slog down the coast of New South Wales, across the Bass Strait, and up the often flukey estuary of the Derwent River to the city centre finish in Hobart.

One false call from experienced navigator Adrienne Cahalane – whose people hail from Offaly – and a mountain of effort beforehand and afloat would have amounted to nothing.

But after blasting away from a perfect start to establish what is believed to be a record for the first short stage from the harbour to Sydney Heads, Wild Oats never put a foot wrong.

unusual

At times she was even showing as the overall handicap leader, which is unusual for the biggest boat in the fleet.

For much of the race, the handicap lead was between the defending champion, Steve Ainsworth’s 63ft Loki, with Gordon Maguire (originally from Howth) as sailing master, and the hot new boat on the block, Peter Harburg’s 66ft Black Jack, whose crew – including Olympic gold medallist Tom Slingsby – made no secret of targeting Loki.

Being slightly larger, Black Jack seemed to be establishing an unassailable lead, as the quicker you could get south, the more favourable the winds became.

This meant that far ahead, not only did Wild Oats end up sailing her own race, but she carried the breeze right to the end, while the wind was losing power out at sea.

As the hours ticked by after the big boat was finished, the chances of either Black Jack or Loki saving their time on the Oatley boat evaporated. Wild Oats XI had the treble – line honours, course record, and overall win.

But in the private race with Black Jack, Maguire and his team somehow found extra microns of performance, and though they were beaten by Wild Oats by more than two hours on corrected time, they in turn beat Black Jack by 2 hours 3 minutes.

- WM Nixon

Irish Independent


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Gusto closing on a sailing trifecta

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Sport

Date

December 28, 2012

Adam Cooper

Adam Cooper

Reporter for The Age

View more articles from Adam Cooper


Email Adam



GUSTO was on target to achieve a unique trifecta in Australian sailing on Thursday night, as the Brighton yacht comfortably led the Melbourne to Launceston race.

Fresh from winning the Boxing Day Dash across Port Phillip Bay, Gusto was aiming to win the race to the island state’s north coast to go with the wins she posted in the Melbourne to Hobart races in 2010 (west coast) and last year (east coast).

Gusto was the first of more than 30 boats to reach the Queenscliff marker and then sail out of the Heads after leaving Portsea on Thursday afternoon. By Thursday night Brian Pattinson and his crew had opened a lead of 12 nautical miles over Noel May’s Ninety Seven, while No Fearr was in third place.

The first of the boats racing to Launceston were expected to cross the finish line on Friday morning.

Goldfinger, the boat that sailed into Bass Strait second after Gusto, was comfortably leading the eastcoaster race to Hobart on Thursday night. Peter Blake’s boat was 13 nautical miles ahead of XLR8, skippered by Ray Shaw, with Seven 50 in third place.

The fleet was a lot closer in the traditional westcoaster race, where eXtasea, skippered by Paul Buchholz, held a narrow lead over Bandit and Spirit of Downunder.

Bandit, the handicap winner in the Boxing Day race, was the third boat out of the Heads on Thursday.

The first of the boats racing to Hobart are expected to reach the Tasmanian capital on Sunday morning. The overall fleet began racing on Thursday with a northerly breeze as assistance, but the wind dropped soon after. A southerly breeze met the boats as they sailed into Bass Strait.


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Breakthrough year for NZ women's sailing

Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie

New Zealand claim gold in 470 sailing

Burling, Tuke guaranteed a silver in 49ers

Burling, Tuke confirm Rio 2016 challenge

Aleh and Powrie revel in heavy conditions

An Olympics Games for NZ to savour

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There is little doubt that 2012 will be remembered in sailing circles as the year that Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie made a significant breakthrough for women’s sailing.

Not only had it been 20 years since New Zealand had won an Olympic medal in a class other than boardsailing, but until Aleh and Powrie’s magnificent gold medal in the women’s 470 on the waters of Weymouth, no New Zealand female crew had won an Olympic title in a boat.

Aleh and Powrie, both from Auckland, swiped that monkey off the back, and in some style.

They were tied with Brits Hannah Mills and Saskia Clark going into the all-important medal race but the Kiwis made the right move at the start and never looked back.

The Brits went one way, the Kiwis went the other and, after massive separation, the Kiwis were first and the Brits were last at the first cross.

There was no way back for the home crew as Aleh and Powrie claimed New Zealand’s second sailing medal of the regatta.

Two days earlier, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke were the recipients of New Zealand’s 100th ever Olympic medal when they claimed silver in the men’s 49er skiff class, behind their training partners Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen of Australia.

Burling went on to skipper Team Korea in the America’s Cup world series while Tuke was to race in the Sydney to Hobart.

But both have committed to campaign again in the 49er for Rio. Aleh and Powrie also re-committed to Rio in the 470.

There were also top-8s at the Olympics for Paul Snow-Hansen and Jason Saunders (fifth in men’s 470), Hamish Pepper and Jim Turner (fifth in the Star), Andrew Murdoch, (fifth in the Laser), JP Tobin (seventh in the men’s RS:X windsurfer) and Dan Slater (seventh in the Finn).

At world championships level, Burling and Tuke were second, Tobin claimed bronze, as did Andy Maloney in the Laser world championship, despite missing Olympic selection.

In the bigger boats, Team New Zealand continue to lead the way in testing of the AC72s, which will be used for next year’s America’s Cup, with defenders Oracle currently out of action after a serious mishap in training when they capsized and broke the wingsail in October.

There was better news for the Americans in the smaller AC45 world series, though, as they won the inaugural series from Team New Zealand, who were also bridesmaids with their Volvo Ocean Race entry Camper, which made a late charge but couldn’t overhaul race winner Groupama and had to settle for second.

A good year for: Jo Aleh and Polly Powrie. Olympic gold medal in the women’s 470. Doesn’t get any better.

A bad year for: Oracle. Yes, they won the AC45 world series, but who really cares? It’s all about next year’s America’s Cup and they’re not looking in great nick. Did someone say capsize?

Crystal ball gazing: Olympic class sailing falls completely off the charts, as it does for three in every four years, while Team 一 New Zealand win the America’s Cup but without anywhere near the hype of yesteryear.

– © Fairfax NZ News



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UPDATE 1-Sailing-Wild Oats win sixth Sydney-Hobart in record time

(Adds details, quotes)

* Westerly shift almost ended record chase

* Ragamuffin to face jury over race start

Dec 28 (Reuters) – Race favourites Wild Oats XI clinched their sixth Sydney to Hobart yacht race on Friday, beating their own race record.

The Mark Richards-skippered super-maxi, which had been pushed along for much of Thursday by strong northerly winds, crossed the finish line in Tasmania at about 0723 (2023 GMT) to break their own record by just under 20 minutes.

Their unofficial time was one day, 18 hours, 21 minutes and 17 seconds.

Wild Oats set the record of one day, 18 hours, 40 minutes and 10 seconds in 2005 when they not only took line honours for the 628-nautical mile blue water classic but also won the overall handicap title as well.

“Only just the race record and you know what 2005 was a great year but this year was so much better, this is a great result for the whole team,” Richards told Australia’s Channel 7. “We are absolutely stoked.”

Last year’s winners Ragamuffin Loyal – who pipped Wild Oats to the line by less than three minutes in 2011 – were about 50 nautical miles from the finish line in second place, though they will face a race jury later to determine whether they will be penalised for jumping the gun in Sydney on Wednesday.

Super-maxi Lahana were in third place, about 55 nautical miles behind Ragamuffin.

WESTERLY CHANGE

Wild Oats had been surfing at more than 24 knots down the east coast of Tasmania on Thursday and at one stage were more than 30 nautical miles ahead of her 2005 record pace before the westerly change.

They rounded Tasman Island off the south-eastern tip of the island state at about 0330 (1630 GMT) and had been projected to finish about 50 minutes outside their record.

A south-westerly wind, however, picked up just before they entered the Derwent River and propelled them to the finish where they were greeted by a large flotilla of boats escorting them to victory.

“It was a very tricky night,” Richards added.

“The breeze died on us and then the southerly came through but it was very soft and very testing and we had to do a lot of sail changes and just worked ourselves into the ground and the guys did a great job but here we are and I’m very, very happy.”

Richards said one of their daggerboards had hit an object early on Thursday, but it had not affected them too badly.

“We don’t know what it was, it could have been a log or something,” Richards said.

Wild Oats’ victory moved them within one win of equalling the record of seven held by Morna/Kurrewa IV.

The start of this year’s race on Wednesday had been shrouded in controversy with the exclusion of 2003 line honours winner Wild Thing for failing to provide necessary documentation for modifications to the boat.

Just two of the 76 boats to have started the race have so far been forced to withdraw, with Living Doll suffering a broken rudder while Primitive Cool damaged their mainsail.

Both were heading back to Eden on the New South Wales coast for repairs, race organisers said. (Reporting by Greg Stutchbury in Wellington; Editing by Mark Meadows)


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Sailing-Wild Oats win sixth Sydney-Hobart in record time

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UPDATE 2-Sailing-Wild Oats win sixth Sydney-Hobart in record time

* Westerly shift almost ended record chase

* Ragamuffin to face jury over race start (Confirms official finishing time, adds fresh quotes)

Dec 28 (Reuters) – Race favourites Wild Oats XI clinched their sixth Sydney to Hobart yacht race on Friday, beating their own race record.

The Mark Richards-skippered super-maxi, which had been pushed along for much of Thursday by strong northerly winds, crossed the finish line in Tasmania at 0723 (2023 GMT).

Their official time was one day, 18 hours, 23 minutes and 12 seconds.

Wild Oats set the previous record of one day, 18 hours, 40 minutes and 10 seconds in 2005 when they not only took line honours for the 628-nautical mile blue water classic but also won the overall handicap title as well.

“It was a really tough, testing race for the team and the crew and the gear handling,” Richards told reporters at Constitution Dock after his team had initially thought they would miss the race record.

“It was a very, very tricky night last night and we got here and after last year’s defeat the boys were on a real mission this year to redeem ourselves.”

Last year’s winners Ragamuffin Loyal – who pipped Wild Oats to the line by less than three minutes in 2011 – were about 50 nautical miles from the finish in second place when Richards and his crew crossed the line.

The Syd Fischer-owned Ragamuffin were mired in light winds and just after 0930 (2230 GMT) still had about 35 nautical miles to go to reach the finish.

However, they will face a race jury later to determine whether they will be penalised for jumping the gun in Sydney on Wednesday.

Super-maxi Lahana were in third place, about 50 nautical miles behind Ragamuffin.

WESTERLY CHANGE

Wild Oats had been surfing at more than 24 knots down the east coast of Tasmania on Thursday and at one stage were more than 30 nautical miles ahead of her 2005 record pace before a westerly change.

They rounded Tasman Island off the south-eastern tip of the island state at about 0330 (1630 GMT) and had been projected to finish about 50 minutes outside their record.

A south-westerly wind, however, picked up just before they entered the Derwent River and propelled them to the finish where they were greeted by a flotilla of small boats escorting them to victory.

Wild Oats’ victory moved them within one win of equalling the record of seven held by Morna/Kurrewa IV and owner Bob Oatley said they would be back in 2013.

“We’ve never given up; we’ll try to do it again next year,” Oatley said.

“New wings on the keel helped enormously I’m sure, so did the new jib. The design, the crew, the sails and the modifications are what makes the boat fast.”

The start of this year’s race on Wednesday had been shrouded in controversy with the exclusion of 2003 line honours winner Wild Thing for failing to provide necessary documentation for modifications to the boat.

Just two of the 76 boats to have started the race have so far been forced to withdraw, with Living Doll suffering a broken rudder while Primitive Cool damaged their mainsail.

Both were heading back to Eden on the New South Wales coast for repairs, race organisers said. (Reporting by Greg Stutchbury in Wellington; Editing by Mark Meadows)


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