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AVA, USA incorporates and hires General Manager

AVA, USA
August 31, 2012
Filed under News

Press Release

30 Aug, 2012: AVA, USA

AVA International, manufacturer of luxury Sedan Bridge Motoryachts, enters the North American market and establishes corporate offices in Knoxville, TN. Additionally, AVA, USA is investing in a satellite location in South Florida. AVA International appointed Brad Peer as General Manager to head up the U.S. efforts. Peer is responsible for establishing domestic production as well as North American and European sales.

Peer joins AVA, USA with a background in marine sales, having worked with Meridian Yachts as a regional sales manager before taking on increased responsibility to manage sales and production for the brand, globally. Prior to joining AVA, USA, Peer was sales manager at Lake Union Sea Ray’s flagship location in Seattle, WA.

“AVA Yachts define the diverse segment of active people who do not settle for traditional norms and tired repetition so commonly found in the boating industry.” Peer says. “I am excited to bring such a high quality, fresh and unique product to the U.S. – something that will invigorate customers.” Peer continued. The company is planning an electronic reveal of the product this fall. AVA, USA has initiated discussions with potential dealers and will launch the AVA brand at the upcoming Miami Boat Show. Marine dealers interested in learning more can contact AVA, USA.

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Paralympic sailors ready to race

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Chaparral Australia Wins International Dealer of the Year

Chaparral Australia has taken out the coveted International dealer of the year award at the 48th annual dealer conference and awards ceremony.  Over 200 dealers from the U.S and around the world attended the gala event in Tampa, Florida where dealers are recognised for sales and customer service over the 2012 model year.  “We knew we were in the running for a top three sales award; but to achieve number one was a real honour and also testament to the hard work of not only our entire network but importantly the support we have had from the local media and of course the faith our customers placed in us by choosing Chaparral in the first place” said Scott O’Hare from Chaparral Australia.

Traditionally, the winner of the international dealer award has not only has a standout sales result, but also has provided the highest level of customer service and demonstrated a commitment to the industry as a whole.  “This award reflects our current position in the Australian market” says O’Hare; “We have worked tirelessly to gain market share, creating a strong marketing presence via media, attending shows, keeping our customers informed and always putting our best foot forward.”  Of course the boats themselves are the real hero’s; with such a brilliant selection of boats now numbering 44 models across the range, Chaparral have given us plenty to work with”.”

Chaparral Australia have a complete dealer network servicing Australia and offer boats ranging from the new entry level H2o ski/fish and sport bowriders, SSi premium bowriders, saltwater wake boats, cuddy’s, high performance sports cruisers and the flagship 42 Premiere.

With 48 years of boat building experience under the same management team, Chaparral have undertaken a huge R D program releasing over 25 new boats in three years.  They now hold the number one market share position in a number of segments and are in the top three world’s biggest boat builders.  For more information on the Chaparral range or to find your nearest dealer, go to www.chaparralaustralia.com.au


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My Swallows and Amazons childhood on Arthur Ransome’s boat (Elf ‘n’ safety …

By
Julia Jones

19:19 EST, 30 August 2012


|

20:13 EST, 30 August 2012

Eighty years ago, Arthur Ransome published Peter Duck – the third in his classic Swallows And Amazons series and his first big sales success.

I seem to possess half a dozen copies, but there’s one that I particularly cherish. It’s battered, frayed and faded – slightly grubby, if I’m honest.

It’s the copy I used to read endlessly when I was a child.

Family fun: Julia Jones, aged two, with her mother and brother

The novel tells an exciting story: a sinister black schooner stalks heroes and heroines down the English Channel and across the Bay of Biscay to a Caribbean island where pirate treasure has been buried.

There’s an earthquake, a killer waterspout, giant crabs. For years I found it hard to put my toes to the end of my bed at night for fear of their nipping pincers.

Purist Ransome fans sometimes confess that they’re never quite sure about Peter Duck – or about Ransome’s other out-and-out thriller, Missee Lee.

The children in 1932 had no such doubts.

When the reviewer in a literary paper dared suggest that it was inferior to Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, young readers wrote to protest: ‘The adventures in Peter Duck might happen to any boy and girl nowadays, whereas Treasure Island is not so real to us.

‘We feel we are with the children in Mr Ransome’s books and we know them as friends.’

Boating: Julia’s father George Jones sailing Arthur Ransome’s former ketch Peter Duck

I wasn’t around in 1932, but I’m sure I would have agreed. I have my own special relationship with the book and its author. It’s a relationship which began long before I could read at all.

It began in 1957 when I was not quite three years old. That was when my parents bought Arthur Ransome’s Peter Duck. Not the book, but the boat he named after his story.

Peter Duck was the fourth yacht Arthur Ransome had owned. He and his Russian wife, Evgenia, were people who never felt quite satisfied. They moved house often and changed boats almost as frequently.

The boat had been built specially for him at Pin Mill on the River Orwell in Suffolk in 1946. By this time in his life, Ransome, aged 62, was suffering from ‘ruptures’ – by which he meant hernias – and stomach troubles and he planned this new boat as a ‘marine bath chair’ for his old age.

Everything on board the 28ft ketch was made light and easy to handle. He also included a writing desk in the cabin design and a special locker, which was to be his typewriter store.

Great author: Ransome had the boat built for him to enjoy during his old age

Great author: Ransome had the boat built for him to enjoy during his old age

The title character in Peter Duck was an old sailor who’d been round Cape Horn so often that he knew it  ‘as well as he knew the crook of his own thumb’.

He was a reliable, reassuring personality ‘with a fringe of white beard round a face that was as brown and wrinkled as a walnut’ and his name should have been perfect for the new yacht – except that Peter Duck, the ancient mariner, didn’t like getting old and neither did Ransome.

The writer kept his marine bath chair for only a few years before selling her and retreating from East Anglia back to his beloved Lake District.

The Ransomes met my parents a few years later. Restless as ever, Arthur and Evgenia had returned from the Lake District for a sailing holiday on the River Deben in Suffolk.

Dad had set up a yacht agency as soon as he’d been demobbed after World War II and my mother was one of his earliest customers.

They began married life in the hut by the River Deben in Suffolk that Dad and his brother had used from childhood – when they’d pedalled miles from the family farm to learn to sail under the local waterman.

Peter Duck was no longer in the area, but Mum and Dad owned a suitable yacht called Barnacle Goose, which Arthur and Evgenia could borrow.

Mum remembers rowing out in her dinghy that first evening to check that all was well. She and Dad had only been married a year and she’d put some of her best wedding present saucepans on the boat for the older couple to use.

Unfortunately, they were made of aluminium which Evgenia Ransome had banned as being bad for Arthur’s ulcers. Mum got thoroughly ticked off and didn’t stay long.

The Ransomes didn’t come to Suffolk again, but a few years later Dad heard that their former yacht Peter Duck was for sale and hurried to buy her.

Julia Jones steering Peter Duck, which her father bought

My father marked the occasion with a new page in his log book. He headed it with a quotation from Ransome’s novel: ‘Duck’s my name … Peter Duck, and Duck’s my nature, and I’ve been afloat as you might say, ever since I were a duckling.’

My brother was 15 months old and I would soon be three. We had, indeed, been afloat since we were ducklings.  Even before Peter Duck entered our lives, we had been taken aboard a variety of boats.

Fortunately for us ducklings, the same features on Peter Duck that had been designed to suit an elderly author with hernias adapted perfectly for a crew of tots. The marine bath chair became a nautical pram and she stayed in our family for the next 27 years, the centre of our family life.

We had endless fun on board Peter Duck as we explored the rivers and the muddy creeks of Suffolk and Essex. Our parents encouraged us to get involved and take responsibility from an early age.

Looking back now, in the risk-averse 21st century, I can’t help feeling surprised when I read my father’s log book and see that I was trusted to row my younger brother to and from the shore on my own when I was little more than four.

He – I notice with a stab of jealousy – steered Peter Duck from the Rocks (a downriver anchorage) back to our mooring when he was only three years and nine-and-a-half months old. Dad evidently liked to be precise about these things.

I’d hate to give the impression that my parents weren’t careful and sensible, but their approach was very much in the spirit of Arthur Ransome.

Ransome’s most quoted saying comes early in the first book in the series, Swallows And Amazons (1930), which is set in the Lake District.

The children write to their father to ask permission to take a sailing dinghy to an island on the lake and camp there by themselves. Father is away with his Royal Navy ship, but at last he responds by telegram. ‘Better drowned than duffers,’ he writes. ‘If not duffers, won’t drown.’

‘What does it mean?’ one of the children asks. ‘It means, Yes!’ her younger sister explains. The father trusted his children’s common sense – and if they didn’t have any, they weren’t worth his name.

A few years ago, I wrote my own first sailing adventure and sent it to a well-known literary agent.

The reply came back that she really didn’t think my hero would be able to sail without a proper course of lessons and it was completely implausible that adults would lend a dinghy to a 13-year-old without being constantly present to supervise.

Somehow I knew that she and my story weren’t meant for one another.

Ship ahoy: Julia Jones, aged five, with her brother Nick, then three, playing aboard the Peter Duck

My mother and father were good at
teaching us to sail. Peter Duck had only been designed to sleep two, but
we became a family of five.

My youngest brother had to sleep in an old-fashioned pipe cot lashed above our mother’s bunk; my middle brother slept in the forward part of the boat – the foc’sle, where Ransome had planned to store ropes and spare sails; but I, the oldest, weedled my way into possession of the berth in a deeply recessed space beneath Peter Duck’s deck, where any small bookworm could curl up and read to her heart’s content.

I can still feel the slight prickliness of my cotton-and-feather sleeping bag as I lay there in Peter Duck, sniffing the wood-smoke on a hill above Lake Windermere or thrilled by a daring moonlit raid against the French.

My father died in 1983; we children had grown up and my mother decided that keeping this quintessentially family possession without the family to enjoy it was simply too painful.

Peter Duck was sold. She found new, more adventurous owners – who, as soon as the Cold War was over, sailed her to St Petersburg, the city where Arthur Ransome had been a newspaper correspondent and where he had met Evgenia in the distant years of the Russian Revolution.

Our treasured Peter Duck seemed to have gone for good.

I didn’t even want to think about her. In 1999, however, we heard that Peter Duck was returning from Russia to England and would be put up for sale. My youngest brother and I rushed to Suffolk to welcome her home. It was an unforgettable moment. She looked so weathered, so gallant.

We decided there and then that we must buy and restore her — no small task after those Russian winters.

As soon as my bare feet touched her decks, it was as if my childhood came flooding back to me.
By the spring of 2000, she was ready to be re-launched and I had surreptitiously begun to try some story-scribbling of my own.

I wondered what boats and the sea – our national heritage – might have to offer 21st-century children. I had been working with vulnerable families whose lives were quite unlike the happy homes of the Swallows And Amazons.

I had seen, at first hand, and with horror, how frequently children whose parents were disabled in some way were not helped to grow up within the family unit, but were removed from it and taken into care. This is the situation of my hero in my Strong Winds trilogy.

I had too much fun as a child to want to write either a complaining or a campaigning tract. I wanted my readers to be as excited as I had been when I read Peter Duck or Treasure Island.

I’m confident that there are many of today’s children who possess the same qualities of self-reliance and adventurousness, which sailing requires and which Ransome celebrated — and which my brothers and I had learned on board our very own Peter Duck.

Ghosting Home, the third novel in Julia Jones’s Strong Winds trilogy, is published by Golden Duck at £7.99.


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Rush of Asylum-Seekers before Australian Crackdown

(CANBERRA, Australia) — Australia calls it a “closing-down sale” for people smugglers: Asylum-seekers in rickety boats have been reaching its shores in record numbers to avoid a tougher new deportation policy the country is preparing to implement. For many migrants, the price of haste may be death.

About 150 people were aboard an overcrowded, wooden fishing boat that sank off the Indonesia coast as it headed for a remote Australian island. Only 22 people had been rescued by Thursday evening, and the captain of one rescue vessel believes he saw bodies in the water.

(MORE: Australians Fear for 67 Missing Asylum Seekers)

The emergency was the latest created by a growing human smuggling trade in which thousands of would-be refugees from countries including Afghanistan, Iran and Sri Lanka attempt dangerous sea voyages from Indonesia to Australia.

Australia’s center-left Labor Party government announced plans this month to deter future arrivals by deporting new asylum seekers who arrive by boat to the Pacific atoll of Nauru or to Australia’s nearest neighbor, Papua New Guinea. The government says they will be held in tent camps for as long as they would spend in refugee camps if they had not paid people smugglers to take them to Australia.

The new approach will begin when the Nauru camp opens in September, but meanwhile the rush is on. More than 1,900 people have arrived in Australia in August — the highest monthly total on record — in hopes of accelerating a refugee claims process that can take years.

The numbers have been steadily climbing: More than 9,800 asylum seekers have arrived this year, more than double the total for all of 2011.

“People smugglers are running a closing-down sale,” Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said. He predicts asylum seekers will stop paying people smugglers $10,000 or more to transport them more than 400 kilometers (250 miles) from Indonesia or Malaysia by boat if they are not guaranteed that they will be accepted by Australia.

A previous conservative government established camps in Nauru and Papua New Guinea a decade ago as part of a policy that slowed boat arrivals to a trickle but was condemned by human rights groups as cruel.

A Labor government closed the camps after winning elections in 2007, a year when only 339 asylum seekers arrived by boat. As the numbers have grown, the influx, and the deaths of would-be migrants at sea, have angered many Australians.

No asylum-seeker deaths have been confirmed since the policy change was announced, but more than 300 have lost their lives making the perilous journey across the Sunda Strait between Indonesia and the Australian territory of Christmas Island since December. More than 90 of them died in two boat accidents that occurred within a week of each other in June.

Authorities also fear the worst for 67 asylum seekers who have not contacted family or friends since they left Indonesia on an Australia-bound boat in late June.

In the latest incident, a boat reportedly carrying 150 asylum seekers sank off the main Indonesian island of Java on Wednesday.

The crew of a merchant ship taking part in the search, Liberian-flagged APL Bahrain, spotted survivors in the water early Thursday 75 kilometers (45 miles) southwest of Java and rescued six, Clare said.

“There are grave fears for a lot more,” Clare told reporters.

The Bahrain’s captain, Manuel Nistorescu, told the Fairfax Media website that he was about to abandon the late-night search when he heard whistles and yelling from the dark water.

Nistorescu said the six rescued, all Afghan men, appeared to be in good condition and had been in the water for almost 24 hours. There were also women and children aboard the asylum-seeker boat when it sank, he said.

He added that he believed he saw bodies in the water. “I think I saw some of them dead,” he said.

Australian Maritime Safety Authority said a navy patrol boat later retrieved another 16 survivors, and an aircraft crew had spotted more survivors in the water.

Authority spokeswoman Jo Meehan said other merchant ships, Australian military aircraft and Indonesian government ships also were involved in the search.

Australian authorities received a call by satellite phone early Wednesday from someone aboard the missing boat requesting help. The person said there were 150 people aboard and the vessel had engine trouble. The boat was then 15 kilometers (9 miles) off Java, officials said.

Indonesian authorities launched a search with two boats and a helicopter but found no trace of the boat by late Wednesday.

Australia alerted Indonesia to the initial distress call, alerted shipping companies to look out for the boat and offered information including estimates of where the boat might have drifted. Meehan said Australia had offered ships and aircraft to help the Indonesians search Wednesday, but the offer was not taken up at the time.

Gagah Prakoso, spokesman for the Indonesian Search And Rescue Agency, denied that Indonesia had refused any offer of help.

“This is a humanitarian mission and Indonesia will never reject offers from any country including Australia,” Prakoso said.

Clare, who is the minister responsible for Australian rescue authorities, said Indonesia should not be criticized for failing to find survivors on Wednesday.

“It is very hard to find people that are in distress on a little wooden boat in the middle of the Sunda Strait,” he said.

Yopie Haryadi, an official of the Indonesian Search And Rescue Agency, said an Indonesian rescue boat and two helicopters had on Wednesday searched a 10-kilometer (6-mile) radius where Australian authorities said the distressed boat was located, but did not find finding wreckage or an oil spill.

The merchant ship found the first six survivors after Australia expanded the search area.

___

By ROD McGUIRK
Associated Press writer Niniek Karmini contributed to this report from Jakarta.


Similar news:

Rush of Asylum-Seekers before Australian Crackdown

(CANBERRA, Australia) — Australia calls it a “closing-down sale” for people smugglers: Asylum-seekers in rickety boats have been reaching its shores in record numbers to avoid a tougher new deportation policy the country is preparing to implement. For many migrants, the price of haste may be death.

About 150 people were aboard an overcrowded, wooden fishing boat that sank off the Indonesia coast as it headed for a remote Australian island. Only 22 people had been rescued by Thursday evening, and the captain of one rescue vessel believes he saw bodies in the water.

(MORE: Australians Fear for 67 Missing Asylum Seekers)

The emergency was the latest created by a growing human smuggling trade in which thousands of would-be refugees from countries including Afghanistan, Iran and Sri Lanka attempt dangerous sea voyages from Indonesia to Australia.

Australia’s center-left Labor Party government announced plans this month to deter future arrivals by deporting new asylum seekers who arrive by boat to the Pacific atoll of Nauru or to Australia’s nearest neighbor, Papua New Guinea. The government says they will be held in tent camps for as long as they would spend in refugee camps if they had not paid people smugglers to take them to Australia.

The new approach will begin when the Nauru camp opens in September, but meanwhile the rush is on. More than 1,900 people have arrived in Australia in August — the highest monthly total on record — in hopes of accelerating a refugee claims process that can take years.

The numbers have been steadily climbing: More than 9,800 asylum seekers have arrived this year, more than double the total for all of 2011.

“People smugglers are running a closing-down sale,” Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said. He predicts asylum seekers will stop paying people smugglers $10,000 or more to transport them more than 400 kilometers (250 miles) from Indonesia or Malaysia by boat if they are not guaranteed that they will be accepted by Australia.

A previous conservative government established camps in Nauru and Papua New Guinea a decade ago as part of a policy that slowed boat arrivals to a trickle but was condemned by human rights groups as cruel.

A Labor government closed the camps after winning elections in 2007, a year when only 339 asylum seekers arrived by boat. As the numbers have grown, the influx, and the deaths of would-be migrants at sea, have angered many Australians.

No asylum-seeker deaths have been confirmed since the policy change was announced, but more than 300 have lost their lives making the perilous journey across the Sunda Strait between Indonesia and the Australian territory of Christmas Island since December. More than 90 of them died in two boat accidents that occurred within a week of each other in June.

Authorities also fear the worst for 67 asylum seekers who have not contacted family or friends since they left Indonesia on an Australia-bound boat in late June.

In the latest incident, a boat reportedly carrying 150 asylum seekers sank off the main Indonesian island of Java on Wednesday.

The crew of a merchant ship taking part in the search, Liberian-flagged APL Bahrain, spotted survivors in the water early Thursday 75 kilometers (45 miles) southwest of Java and rescued six, Clare said.

“There are grave fears for a lot more,” Clare told reporters.

The Bahrain’s captain, Manuel Nistorescu, told the Fairfax Media website that he was about to abandon the late-night search when he heard whistles and yelling from the dark water.

Nistorescu said the six rescued, all Afghan men, appeared to be in good condition and had been in the water for almost 24 hours. There were also women and children aboard the asylum-seeker boat when it sank, he said.

He added that he believed he saw bodies in the water. “I think I saw some of them dead,” he said.

Australian Maritime Safety Authority said a navy patrol boat later retrieved another 16 survivors, and an aircraft crew had spotted more survivors in the water.

Authority spokeswoman Jo Meehan said other merchant ships, Australian military aircraft and Indonesian government ships also were involved in the search.

Australian authorities received a call by satellite phone early Wednesday from someone aboard the missing boat requesting help. The person said there were 150 people aboard and the vessel had engine trouble. The boat was then 15 kilometers (9 miles) off Java, officials said.

Indonesian authorities launched a search with two boats and a helicopter but found no trace of the boat by late Wednesday.

Australia alerted Indonesia to the initial distress call, alerted shipping companies to look out for the boat and offered information including estimates of where the boat might have drifted. Meehan said Australia had offered ships and aircraft to help the Indonesians search Wednesday, but the offer was not taken up at the time.

Gagah Prakoso, spokesman for the Indonesian Search And Rescue Agency, denied that Indonesia had refused any offer of help.

“This is a humanitarian mission and Indonesia will never reject offers from any country including Australia,” Prakoso said.

Clare, who is the minister responsible for Australian rescue authorities, said Indonesia should not be criticized for failing to find survivors on Wednesday.

“It is very hard to find people that are in distress on a little wooden boat in the middle of the Sunda Strait,” he said.

Yopie Haryadi, an official of the Indonesian Search And Rescue Agency, said an Indonesian rescue boat and two helicopters had on Wednesday searched a 10-kilometer (6-mile) radius where Australian authorities said the distressed boat was located, but did not find finding wreckage or an oil spill.

The merchant ship found the first six survivors after Australia expanded the search area.

___

By ROD McGUIRK
Associated Press writer Niniek Karmini contributed to this report from Jakarta.


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Anna Tunnicliffe injured during Extreme Sailing Series

Many of the Olympic sailors, including a posse from Team
GBR, were still enjoying the afterglow of Weymout.
But at least two, while claiming to be there for the fun of it, could not
suppress entirely the competitive instincts that drive top sportsmen and women
to beat their rivals.

Tunnicliffe,
born in Doncaster but now proud to be an American, was in tears in Weymouth a
fortnight ago when her campaign to win a second gold – she did it singlehanded
in the China games – came to a juddering halt in the women’s match racing
event.

Not quite as
choked, but definitely not celebrating, was Hannah Mills as she and crew Saskia
Clark had to settle for silver in the women’s 470 dinghy.

Tunnicliffe
has joined Team GAC Pindar for the rest of the season and, in addition to
throwing her athletic frame across the 40-foot catamaran, is giving voice to a
stream of tactical advice. It worked, as skipper Andy Walsh steered them to
equal second on the day but she was injured in the
final race and team manager Nick Crabtree was doubtful she would be available
for the rest of the regatta, which runs until Sunday.

Mills, whose
eyes speak almost as eloquently as her voice, is racing with Team Wales, a
one-off entry given a wild card ticket to join the eight permanent members of
the world tour.

She is also
using her 50kg frame to help up on the bow of boats which had to reduce power
in the tight confines of a stretch of water formerly, and notoriously, known as
Tiger Bay. There was plenty enough breeze on what the authorities prefer to be
known as Cardiff Bay bounded by new developments and Waterfront Park.

“This is
definitely the type of sailing I want to get into,” said Tunnicliffe, whose
match racing event is currently dropped from the race card in 2016. She expects
to be fighting for the US place in the new women’s skiff in Rio “so I am tuning
into the more high performance type of boat which need fast assessment of the
conditions on the race course and quick decision making.”

Mills and
Clark have already decided to stick with the 470 dinghy in Rio de Janeiro,
though Mills admits she hasn’t been in the gym since the Games. It is also
Mills’ first time home – her parents live a quarter of an hour up the road in
Dinas Powys – since London 2012 and primarily is hoping to sail safe and stay
out of trouble. “We are here to have fun but as soon as we are on the race
course we are trying to win,” she says. “”I am helping on the bow, pulling lots
of ropes, and running around frantically.”

Steering is
Torvar Mirsky with Olympic 49er hopeful Dave Evan and part of the crew with his
Olympic squad partner, Ed Powys but Mills insists “there are jobs which girls
can do on these boats.”  That is, unless the mast falls down and you need
a rescue boat to take you home. No-one was injured.

In the
meantime, Mills says that they are analysing what went wrong in Weymouth. What
went wrong in Weymouth is that she became an Olympic silver medallist.

The other,
match racing, arm of Team GAC Pindar was put on hold all day in Switzerland as
reigning world champion Ian Williams was kept ashore in St. Moritz due to a
lack of wind.

In Kiel, the
first regatta on the new European tour for the MOD70 trimarans, it was aday for
practice racing ahead of two days of inshore races followed by the passage race
to Dun Laoghaire for the second of the five regattas which take in Cascais,
Marseille and Genoa.     


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Anna Tunnicliffe injured during Extreme Sailing Series

Many of the Olympic sailors, including a posse from Team
GBR, were still enjoying the afterglow of Weymout.
But at least two, while claiming to be there for the fun of it, could not
suppress entirely the competitive instincts that drive top sportsmen and women
to beat their rivals.

Tunnicliffe,
born in Doncaster but now proud to be an American, was in tears in Weymouth a
fortnight ago when her campaign to win a second gold – she did it singlehanded
in the China games – came to a juddering halt in the women’s match racing
event.

Not quite as
choked, but definitely not celebrating, was Hannah Mills as she and crew Saskia
Clark had to settle for silver in the women’s 470 dinghy.

Tunnicliffe
has joined Team GAC Pindar for the rest of the season and, in addition to
throwing her athletic frame across the 40-foot catamaran, is giving voice to a
stream of tactical advice. It worked, as skipper Andy Walsh steered them to
equal second on the day but she was injured in the
final race and team manager Nick Crabtree was doubtful she would be available
for the rest of the regatta, which runs until Sunday.

Mills, whose
eyes speak almost as eloquently as her voice, is racing with Team Wales, a
one-off entry given a wild card ticket to join the eight permanent members of
the world tour.

She is also
using her 50kg frame to help up on the bow of boats which had to reduce power
in the tight confines of a stretch of water formerly, and notoriously, known as
Tiger Bay. There was plenty enough breeze on what the authorities prefer to be
known as Cardiff Bay bounded by new developments and Waterfront Park.

“This is
definitely the type of sailing I want to get into,” said Tunnicliffe, whose
match racing event is currently dropped from the race card in 2016. She expects
to be fighting for the US place in the new women’s skiff in Rio “so I am tuning
into the more high performance type of boat which need fast assessment of the
conditions on the race course and quick decision making.”

Mills and
Clark have already decided to stick with the 470 dinghy in Rio de Janeiro,
though Mills admits she hasn’t been in the gym since the Games. It is also
Mills’ first time home – her parents live a quarter of an hour up the road in
Dinas Powys – since London 2012 and primarily is hoping to sail safe and stay
out of trouble. “We are here to have fun but as soon as we are on the race
course we are trying to win,” she says. “”I am helping on the bow, pulling lots
of ropes, and running around frantically.”

Steering is
Torvar Mirsky with Olympic 49er hopeful Dave Evan and part of the crew with his
Olympic squad partner, Ed Powys but Mills insists “there are jobs which girls
can do on these boats.”  That is, unless the mast falls down and you need
a rescue boat to take you home. No-one was injured.

In the
meantime, Mills says that they are analysing what went wrong in Weymouth. What
went wrong in Weymouth is that she became an Olympic silver medallist.

The other,
match racing, arm of Team GAC Pindar was put on hold all day in Switzerland as
reigning world champion Ian Williams was kept ashore in St. Moritz due to a
lack of wind.

In Kiel, the
first regatta on the new European tour for the MOD70 trimarans, it was aday for
practice racing ahead of two days of inshore races followed by the passage race
to Dun Laoghaire for the second of the five regattas which take in Cascais,
Marseille and Genoa.     


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