Archive for » February 12th, 2012«

Gulls Gotta Go Unleashes the Gulls Cat

Birds beware! Gulls Gotta Go launches the “Gulls Cat” an innovative, green energy driven bird deterrent with twitching tail and skyward-looking face that moves. Debutting at the New England Boat Show in Boston (February 11-19).

Gloucester, Massachusetts (PRWEB) February 12, 2012

In 2011, avid boater and former software sales rep Bob Alves launched a personal war on birds, specifically the gulls, terns and cormorants that were befouling his beloved 1968 Egg Harbor Sportsfish.

“I’ve purchased the existing bird-deterrent solutions—which have been around for decades—but they just didn’t work,” said Alves. “It got me thinking: Why hasn’t someone come up with something more effective?”

A memory from his days as a child, growing up on the docks of Gloucester, Mass., provided an answer. Alves recalled an elderly marina owner who would feed feral cats to keep the birds and rats off his property. Inspired by this recollection, Alves sought the advice of ornithologists and other experts, which eventually led to the creation of an innovative, viscous-looking feline facsimile that Alves dubbed the Gulls Cat.

Using subtle movements powered by green-energy sources such as wind or sea, the Gulls Cat resembles a hungry predator. The Gulls Cat is equipped with a twitching tail and skyward-looking face that moves with the slightest breeze or rocking action of the boat or dock. Birds instinctively avoid it.

Tests in the summer of 2011 proved that the Gulls Cat worked even better than Alves had hoped. Numerous samples were sent to boaters throughout New England and all of them found that the product kept birds from landing on their boats and docks. “We really knew we were onto something when we collected the prototypes the day before Hurricane Irene hit the Northeast. The following day our testers were calling and texting, demanding that we return the Cat.” Alves said.

Now the Gulls Cat is out of the bag and boaters everywhere will get to see this exciting new bird-deterrent when it makes its debut at the New England Boat Show in Boston (February 11-19). It’s the perfect opportunity to take pre-season action to keep birds off your boat this spring! Drop by Booth 422 for a live demo.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/2/prweb9189283.htm


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Travel show next weekend

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The 2012 edition of the Philadelphia Sport, Travel and Outdoor Show will embark on its annual run at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at the Oaks this week, beginning Thursday and running through Sunday.

The show is the biggest outdoor show held in the Trenton-Philly area. So here are some highlights of this year’s show.

Jack Dagger: The King of Fling is a world-renowned knife-throwing comedian (performing in over 2,000 shows).

He has been inducted into the International Knife Throwers Hall of Fame, won several world championships, and has invented the first new knife-throwing stunt in almost 100 years – The Jack Knife, Cucumber Slice, which was demonstrated on “The Tonight Show” when Conan O’Brien was the host.

Swampmaster: Jeff Quattrocchi, who’s better known as “The Swampmaster,” is a professional alligator handler.

He may find that the 7-foot alligator will see eye-to-eye as Quattrocchi demonstrates his skill at alligator handling, one of the features at this year’s show.

The Hawg Trough: Watch pro fishermen cast to live bass in a 6,000-gallon aquarium and demonstrate how to use jigs, spinnerbaits and plastic baits.

You’ll learn how fish react to the presentation.

FLW Reel Casting Kids Competition: On Sunday, the Pennsylvania Bass Federation will hold a free FLW Reel Casting Kids Competition from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

The Berks Bassmasters will host two separate age groups, one for ages 8-11 and another for ages 12-15.

Winners in each age group will be eligible to move on to the Pennsylvania State Finals held at Cabela’s in Hamburg, Pa., later this fall.

Winners of the state finals will be eligible for scholarships or other prizes.

The ‘Cave’: Cold River Mining Company will present the “Cave.” Kids will be able to enter a dark cave-like atmosphere and hunt for fossils.

This will present a unique and educational experience for children.

Cold River Mining will again provide their gemstone-panning sluice in addition to the “Cave.”

Fishing Simulator: Watch on a large-screen TV as the fish you’ve just hooked jumps and dives while the pull on the line exactly simulates the action of the fish. Fun for anglers of all ages.

Stihl Archery Range: Volunteers from the United Bowhunters of Pennsylvania will be on hand to provide expert advice and instruction.

Seasoned archers can also try out the latest in bows from exhibiting retailers.
Legendary Bowhunter Myles Keller: Myles will be holding court at the Sportshow.

A member of the Bowhunters Hall of Fame, Myles earned his recognition through years of well-documented success.

Myles’ attendance at the show is sponsored by United Country Outfitters (booth 609). Myles is a United Country Outfitters Pro Staff member.

Guides, Charter Boats, Outfitters and Lodges: If you are looking to book a fishing or hunting trip, charter boat or a lodge for your vacation, the show will have on hand fishing and hunting guides, charter and party boats, outfitters and lodges and travel destinations.

New Jersey, Delaware, New York and New England party and charter boats will be well-represented at the show, and hunting guides from the East Coast, Midwest, Alaska, and Canada will give you a look at what’s in store for the North American hunter.

Plenty of Seminars and Workshops: The show also offers you a chance to pick up some tips on hunting and fishing from local and national pros.

Doing workshops at the show will be Scott Martin; Freddie McKnight; Lou Consoli; C.J. Winand; Mike Laptew; Mark Wolfskill; Bob Murry; Capt. Steve Hovath; Mike Acord; Chris Gorsuch; Blaine Mengel; Paul Fuller; and more.

I’ll be at the show on Friday doing a Jetty Fishing workshop at 2:15 p.m., and on Saturday doing a Jetty fishing workshop at 12:15 p.m. and a Party Boat Fishing workshop at 3 p.m.

Show Hours: Thursday, 1-9 p.m.; Friday, 12:30-9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission prices are $11 for adults and $3 for children (5 to 11 years old); children under 5 are admitted free of charge.

Fishing Report
Saltwater: Capt. Greg Markett of the Golden Eagle reports Capt. Jim Eliot has been finding an excellent numbers of medium size mackerel 10-12 miles to the northeast of Shark River Inlet.

Excellent mackerel fishing was also the word from Capt. Al Shinn of the Miss Belmar Princess.

Al said anglers saw non-stop action with medium size macs about 8-12 miles to the northeast of the inlet.

Capt. Bob Quinn of the Ocean Explorer reported excellent fishing in 100 feet of water to the northeast of Shark River Inlet.

The boat has been putting anglers into nice-sized ling, plenty of throwback sea bass, occasional stripers and cod, and even an occasional fluke.

Capt. Howard Bogan of the Jamaica reported good catches of ling, along with increasing numbers of cod on the boats most recent offshore trips.

Capt. Willie Egerter of the Dauntless reported his trips last week saw coolers full of ling along with some cod and blackfish. Willie said he has been fishing along the east edge of the Mud Hole in 100-150 -feet of water. Capt. Francis Bogan of the Paramount gave us a call to say his recent trips have been into excellent ling fishing along with cod to 10 pounds on his Mud Hole Marathon trips.

Local Fishing: Crappies, bass, pickerel and perch continue to supply picky fishing in local lakes and ponds.

Last week saw the slowest fishing of the winter with mainly white and yellow perch being caught, along with a few bass, crappies and pickerel.

Water temps in local waters continued to hover around the 40-degree mark. If the predicted cooling trend happens, look for anglers to have problems with skim ice this week. Carnegie Lake, the Millstone River, Lake Mercer and Stone Tavern Lake saw the better fishing last week.

Delaware River: Reports coming from the river have been few in recent weeks. Anglers fishing the river north of Trenton have been picking up a few walleyes on live bait and plugs in Lambertville, Scudders Falls and Bryam.

Fishing at the Trenton Power Plant has also been spotty due to a lack of warm water, however, we have been getting reports of crappies, perch and bass being caught in Tulleytown Cove and other tidal coves on the top of the tide, mainly on live bait.
Elsewhere: We received reports of trout being caught from the shoreline at Round Valley; crappie and panfish being caught from Farrington Lake; perch being caught from the bridges at Lake Hopatcong; and very good pickerel fishing in the south Jersey Pine Barrens.

Contact J.B. Kasper at jb.kasper@verizon.net.

Follow the Times of Trenton on Twitter.


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3M replacing retiring CEO

– 3M Co., the maker of Post-Its and Scotch Tape, has named a new chief executive.

With his employment contract set to expire this month, CEO George Buckley will retire June 1, the company announced Wednesday. It named chief operating officer Inge Thulin to replace him, effective Feb. 24. Thulin will also join 3M’s board.

During Buckley’s six years as CEO, 3M’s sales rose by 40 percent. Thulin was a big part of that.

Before he became COO last May, Thulin was head of international operations, and the company credits him with building international sales to nearly $20 billion annually. 3M’s revenue totaled $29.61 billion last year.

Wall Street has been waiting for the Maplewood, Minn., company to name a new CEO. As Buckley approached 3M’s mandatory retirement age of 65, analysts clamored for information about a succession plan.

Published reports suggested that some 3M board members wanted the popular CEO to stay on despite the company’s age cap. Buckley, too, did not seem eager to leave.

“Unless I drop dead first, I’m going to work here as long as the board wants me to work here,” he said last year.

In a note to clients, Morningstar analyst Adam Fleck said he thinks investors will applaud the selection of a company insider for its top spot because it suggests 3M is in large part planning to continue business as usual. Fleck thinks Thulin’s international experience can only help the company grow more overseas.

Buckley will remain chairman until the company’s annual shareholder meeting in May, when Thulin is expected to be elected.

Besides its trademark Post-Its and Scotch Tape, 3M also makes products as varied as stethoscopes and films for LCD televisions.

Buckley, who is British, came to the company in 2005 from boat maker Brunswick Corp. At the time, some observers questioned the choice of an outsider from a much smaller company, although Buckley had proven himself in the boat industry.

When he joined Brunswick in 2000, he dramatically expanded the 160-year-old company’s market presence. He snatched up boat and engine brands including Lund, Sea Pro and some suppliers. He also moved to create a used-boat business.

Trained as an electrical engineer, Buckley called 3M an “engineer’s heaven” and an “ethical upstanding super-engineering machine.” Under him, 3M made a number of acquisitions, including those that boosted its technology offerings in recent years.

Thulin said the company “will continue to look for a lot of acquisitions” when he takes the lead. It will also keep investing in new products, continuing a pattern of research and development that accelerated under Buckley.

Thulin, a native of Sweden, has been with 3M for 32 years. He began his career there with 3M in sales and marketing.


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OUTDOORS: A smaller king still reigns supreme

For King and his three fishing partners, Eric Pedersen, Jim Fowler and Josh Kujawa, the king salmon garnered a cool $16,700 in cash winnings. That’s $10,000 first prize from the derby and another informal winner-takes-all $100 side bet kitty anted into by 67 of the contestant boats in the event.

State fishing regulations say that all wild chinook salmon, those possessing their adipose fins, must be released alive and unharmed when caught this time in Marine Area 7.

This important rule applies to all anglers and derby organizers are obliged to follow suit and disqualify any non-marked fish.

The fish that are targets of salmon questors are products of artificial production in a hatchery, most likely in Washington state, where just prior to their release as tiny juveniles they had their inconsequential adipose fins snipped off. For the rest of their lives the missing fin marks them as eligible for harvest from waters where wild origin fish are golden (protected) and have to be released and unharmed.

King said that right away from the dock Friday morning (Day 1 of the derby) they were ‘in the fish’ on the northeast side of Waldron Island.

Fishing at various depths with cut-plug herring on a short tide, they brought to the boat and set free three native kings in the 18- to 24-pound range, he said.

Just after 9:40 a.m. they hooked first one chinook, then a second fish hit as King was pulling up gear on another downrigger. This doubleheader yielded the eventual winner, but at the time King said he didn’t think much of the middling king and slipped it into a plastic bag and onto ice in a chest.

Experienced anglers know that salmon, though actually dead, live on in one sense in that they shrink in weight post-mortem.

Later Friday afternoon after checking derby updates on Facebook, King said he suddenly realized that he might have a money fish in the 16-plus pounder, so he exercised his absolute authority as captain of his boat and headed for Roche Harbor, despite protests from his partners who wanted to keep their lines in the water.

Catching the leader fish on Day 1 of a multi-day fishing contest always has its attendant afflictions, in this circumstance a case of butterflies as well as an involuntary compulsion to repeatedly check social media sources or glance at the leaderboard when back at the dock.

Fishing hard to catch a bigger keeper fish on Saturday and Sunday helped and there were other targets such as total boat weight prize for which they could gird themselves.

But, King said, even though they hooked into more salmon, none surpassed the original, so it became a matter of simply waiting nervously as the clock ticked ever-so-slowly down to the event’s end.

King said that landing the money fish is the culmination of his angling aspirations.

“I feel fortunate to live in this area, being able to fish,” King said. “This is a life-long dream, something to mark off your bucket list.”

As for his protesting crew of salmon fishing partners, they went home happy, too.

In the best tradition of sharing on-the-water-gotten bounty, after gratefully tipping the Roche Harbor derby folks, King said he divided the remainder of his boat’s $16,700 total winnings into four equal purses and parceled them out to his mates.

After all, it was a team effort that won the derby, King said.

MORE 2012 SALTWATER DERBIES

Roche Harbor Resort’s winter blackmouth set-to is the first in an annual series of 14 saltwater fishing derbies organized under the aegis of the Northwest Marine Trade Association’s Northwest Salmon Derby Series.

This year the NSDS calendar includes four pre-spring closure (May 1 in many marine areas) events including the upcoming Discovery Bay (Feb. 18-20), Everett (March 17) and Anacortes (March 31-April 1) contests.

When saltwater salmon angling resumes in July in many inland waters locales, Bellingham PSA’s event (July 13-15) heads the list of summer/fall derbies with four more contests in August, three in September and one each in November and December.

Contestants in each of these events, besides vying for the cash and prizes in their chosen individual derby, are also entered in NMTA’s annual sport fishing boat package giveaway, a drawing that occurs each September. Anglers fishing in later contests are entered in the coming year’s boat lottery.

A relative newcomer to the series itself is the December event headquartered in Friday Harbor, sponsored by the Puget Sound Anglers chapter there.

Known as the Resurrection Salmon Derby, its promoters have a goal of enhancing salmon fishing in the San Juan Islands. Last year after clearing the cash prizes the PSA chapter donated $6,900 to the nonprofit organization Long Live the Kings which operates a private salmon hatchery at Glenwood Springs on Orcas Island.

LEGION SALMON CONTEST NEXT WEEK

There’s another less well-known winter fishing contest in the San Juans, but nonetheless it benefits an equally worthy cause.

American Legion Post 93 on Orcas Island holds its 33rd annual salmon derby, open to all comers on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 18-19. Tickets are $50 per person for the two-day event and entry forms are available online at orcaspost93.org/events/fishingder

by. Participants must be registered by midnight Friday, Feb. 17.

Top chinook earns $1,100 with another $2,600 in cash awarded as well as an array of door prizes for derby entrants.

They also host $8-a-plate dinners Friday, Saturday and Sunday of the derby at the post located at 793 Crescent Beach Drive in Eastsound.

The event is held in conjunction with the post’s membership drive Saturday and all proceeds clear of prizes go to the post’s high school/college scholarship fund.

For more details, call 360-376-4689 (Bob) or 360-376-3432 (Steve). The post’s telephone number is 360-376-4987.

BARKLEY SOUND BOUND

The how-to’s of fishing British Columbia’s picturesque Barkley Sound will be discussed at the monthly meeting of the Bellingham Chapter of Puget Sound Anglers Wednesday, Feb. 15.

Mark Schinman of the Anacortes Chapter of PSA has been making pilgrimages to Barkley for its saltwater fish bounty for 26 years. In his multitude of trips he’s learned the ins and outs of getting to this popular, yet still relatively remote side of Vancouver Island not to mention, once there, fishing safely and successfully.

In his presentation, he’ll discuss details of both the overland approach (via ferry) options as well as his own on-the-water route to get out to the fishing village of Ucluelet.

And among the myriad things it’s helpful to know before you go, Schinman also will describe weather and water conditions and how a reliable onboard radar set and GPS can be your best friends when fishing the real hotspots offshore.

Other essentials in his talk include tried and true terminal tackle rigs and Ucluelet’s best places to stay and dine.

Bellingham PSA meets the third Wednesday of each month in the upstairs dining room at Nicki’s Bella Marina Restaurant at Squalicum Harbor.

Programs start at 7 p.m. preceded by a no-host dinner at 6 p.m.. Everyone is welcome, you need not be a member of PSA to attend.

The club annually hosts the Bellingham PSA Family Salmon Derby right after the opening of the summer season. This year’s contest is July 13-15. For more details about Bellingham’s contest and links to other PSA activities, log on to bellinghampsa.com/derby.htm.

SOL DUC PROGRAM TAKEN OFF LINE

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has designated the Olympic Peninsula’s Sol Duc River a wild steelhead sanctuary and has ended a 25-year cooperative wild steelhead augmentation program there.

Supported by the Olympic Peninsula Guides’ Association, the Snider Creek project, annually produced both winter and summer run steelhead smolts for release into the Sol Duc, which is a major feeder stream to the Quillayute River.

Department officials and the coop group are exploring ideas for moving production releases to the neighboring Bogachiel and Calawah rivers, also tributaries of the Quillayute.

STILL CAN KEEP SOUND STURGEON

Sturgeon-targeting anglers may still ply greater Puget Sound and its freshwater tributaries for whites year-round, but the option to keep them when landed is now significantly restricted.

Under a new PS-directed regulation just adopted by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, there will be a 75-day catch and keep opportunity inserted in two periods on the annual angling calendar, June 1-30 and Sept. 1 – Oct. 15.

Intended originally to eliminate completely the interception of seemingly vagabond Columbia and Fraser river whites, the original proposal, number 9 in the package of agency recommended changes for the 2012-2013 regulations, called for a full year-round ban on retention leaving only the release option.

The limited allowable catch presumably will have a smattering of Columbia River sturgeon that may need to be factored into the management regime there.

Commissioners also made permanent early winter closures – anywhere from the middle of January to the middle of February – on six greater Puget Sound streams plus several entering the Strait of Juan de Fuca to protect wild steelhead populations and stripped northern pike of their gamefish status.

WDFW will post on its Website by next week the commission’s recent fish regs rule-making decisions.

MORE FULL SEASON PERMITS

Acting on a recommendation from the department’s wildlife program staff, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission more than doubled the number of multi-season permits that will be awarded this year to Washington deer hunters. In the same vein, panelists also increased elk multi-season permits by about a third.

Holders of these special permits are allowed to hunt in any open unit if all general seasons for the three main hunting weapons categories in a given year provided they use a legal version of the weapon and follow all other rules in place for each season. Practically speaking that’s a time span from the first of September to the end of December.

Drawing entrants will now be vying for 8,500 deer and 1,250 elk multi-season tags. The deadline for applications for the 2012 drawing is Saturday, March 31.

Doug Huddle, The Bellingham Herald’s outdoors correspondent, since 1983, has written a weekly fishing and hunting column that now appears Sundays. Read his blog and contact him at pblogs.bellinghamherald.com/outdoors.


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Gulls Gotta Go Unleashes the Gulls Cat

Gull’s beware… The Gull’s Cat is on the prowl.

“I couldn’t be happier with the performance of the Gulls Cat. It has kept my dock clear of ducks and geese—and their awful feces which covered the dock in the past—day and night. It really works!”

—Howie Hacht, Watertown Yacht Club

Gloucester, Massachusetts (PRWEB) February 12, 2012

In 2011, avid boater and former software sales rep Bob Alves launched a personal war on birds, specifically the gulls, terns and cormorants that were befouling his beloved 1968 Egg Harbor Sportsfish.

“I’ve purchased the existing bird-deterrent solutions—which have been around for decades—but they just didn’t work,” said Alves. “It got me thinking: Why hasn’t someone come up with something more effective?”

A memory from his days as a child, growing up on the docks of Gloucester, Mass., provided an answer. Alves recalled an elderly marina owner who would feed feral cats to keep the birds and rats off his property. Inspired by this recollection, Alves sought the advice of ornithologists and other experts, which eventually led to the creation of an innovative, viscous-looking feline facsimile that Alves dubbed the Gulls Cat.

Using subtle movements powered by green-energy sources such as wind or sea, the Gulls Cat resembles a hungry predator. The Gulls Cat is equipped with a twitching tail and skyward-looking face that moves with the slightest breeze or rocking action of the boat or dock. Birds instinctively avoid it.

Tests in the summer of 2011 proved that the Gulls Cat worked even better than Alves had hoped. Numerous samples were sent to boaters throughout New England and all of them found that the product kept birds from landing on their boats and docks. “We really knew we were onto something when we collected the prototypes the day before Hurricane Irene hit the Northeast. The following day our testers were calling and texting, demanding that we return the Cat.” Alves said.

Now the Gulls Cat is out of the bag and boaters everywhere will get to see this exciting new bird-deterrent when it makes its debut at the New England Boat Show in Boston (February 11-19). It’s the perfect opportunity to take pre-season action to keep birds off your boat this spring! Drop by Booth 422 for a live demo.

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At Pymatuning Lake, hearty walleyes stocked in 2009 are reaching legal size – Pittsburgh Post

A successful plan is a beautiful thing, especially when the story grows from an apparent failure.

In 2001, electro-fishing surveys conducted by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission charted a disturbing decline in walleye numbers on jointly managed Pymatuning Reservoir. In 2005, surveys counted no walleyes in the lake — zero — and anglers reported a catch rate of one for every 30 hours of fishing.

But by 2011, DNR netting surveys showed the walleyes had bounced back to healthy population levels, and those stocked in 2009 were near or over the 15-inch legal size. Angler surveys reported one walleye caught every 1.3 hours — unofficially some fishermen were boating three per hour.

Biologists in both states predict outstanding walleye fishing at Pymatuning in 2012.

The dramatic changes at the 14,000-acre impoundment are the result of natural cycles and a progressive wildlife management approach on both sides of the state line — a scientific method in which actions were taken, analyzed, reconsidered and improved until the desired impact was achieved.

Matt Wolfe, a fisheries biologist at Ohio DNR, will explain the Pymatuning walleye recovery and assess this year’s fishery at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Allegheny Sport, Travel and Outdoor Show at the Monroeville Convention Center at Monroeville Mall.

“Once we noticed a problem, we realized that in a lake the size of Pymatuning, there was only one thing we could control — what we were stocking,” said Wolfe, who grew up in Jeannette, Westmoreland County, and briefly worked for the Fish and Boat Commission.

With little natural walleye reproduction, in the late 1980s DNR and PFBC began stocking millions of inexpensive and easy-to-raise half-inch walleye fry. A large percentage of vulnerable fry routinely succumb to predation, weather and water conditions, but enough seemed to be surviving until the 2000s.

It’s still unclear what changed at Pymatuning resulting in the elimination of an entire year-class of an important predator. Water quality was good and no over-fishing occurred — suspected causes include unusually high predation, a decline in the health of zooplankton that fry eat, or both.

Following the walleye’s population collapse, Ohio switched management tactics, stocking only hatchery-grown fingerlings of 1 to 2 inches. Pennsylvania followed suit, continuing to stock some fry.

In recent years, tons of rock reefs and 100 wooden crib structures were dumped onto the muddy, decaying bottom of Pymatuning Lake, improving a small portion of habitat.

“The fish we’re seeing now are mostly the result of stocking, not natural reproduction,” said Wolfe. “It’s probably about 20 percent natural, 10 percent from the fry that survived and the rest from the fingerlings, which really seemed to take hold in the lake. In fall netting surveys, we found a large number of fish from that 2009 year class.”

That year, excess walleyes from Pennsylvania hatcheries were added to the planned stockings. Fish and Boat biologist Tim Wilson, who is not part of this week’s walleye seminars, said from a wildlife management standpoint it would be unwise to continue stocking at 2009 levels despite the positive results.

“We’ve had respectable survival from other years, as well,” he said. “You don’t want to oversaturate the population to the point where we affect the growth rate. I’m not sure it would be good to have that number every year.”

Wilson said Pennsylvania continues to stock some fry, despite limited results, “with hopes that things [could] return to the days when we could stock fries only. We’d like to go back to that, but so far survival has favored fingerlings.”

Wolfe said he hopes his talk will “give anglers hope,” and recommended bottom-bouncing worm harnesses at Pymatuning Reservoir. Mild winter conditions may encourage walleyes to spawn early this year.

“Once they’re done spawning in mid-April through June, that’s the time to hit that 2009 year-class,” he said.

Pennsylvania’s new rule permitting three rods per angler went into effect Jan. 1. Ohio restricts anglers to two fishing rods, but will permit three rods on Pymatuning at the March 1 start of that state’s license year.


Allegheny Sport, Travel and Outdoor Show runs Wednesday through next Sunday at Monroeville Convention Center. $10 admission, children 12 and under free with paid adult admission. Free parking. 800-600-0307, www.sportandtravel.com.


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Utah Boat Show

The Utah Boat show runs this weekend at the South Towne Expo Center in Sandy.  You will see the newest in all things for the water, including boats, water skiing equipment, wake boards and much, much more!

It runs Thursday – Sunday.  Admission is $9.00 for adults, $7.00 for seniors and children (12 and under) are free with an adult’s admission.  You can find all the information at: http://www.greenband.com/boat_visitor.html

Wednesday, one of the companies who will be there came on the show. Jeremy Thornen with “Marine Products” says it’s important to know what you’re looking for when buying water skis, wake boards and surf boards.   You need to consider your weight, ability and what tricks you will be attempting.

Marine Products Pro Shop has been in business since 1971. They are the original water sport pro shop located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Surrounded by water within 45 minutes of the Salt Lake Airport..
There are two Marine Products locations: The Mother store @ 949 West 1700 South In Salt Lake City, Utah 84104 801-973-4017 the store is approximately 22,000 sq. ft. while the 2nd Location @ 10835 South State in Sandy, Utah 84070 801-553-8332 is approximately 7.500 sq.ft.

They stock what we sell and very seldom need to drop ship from factories like so many other e-commerce sites do.

Marine Products has received the coveted WSIA Dealer of the Year Award 3 times in the past 6 years. And 2009 Promotional Dealer of the Year. This medal of honor is awarded only to dealers that excel in customer service, support the water sports industry, are active in teaching and promoting safe boating, promote the sport of wake boarding and water skiing, and actively sponsor water sport events and clinics thru out the year.

Additionally, Marine Products sponsors 4 Wake Board schools that teach the beginning Grom to the Advanced Outlaw dude, All pulled behind the newest Supra, Axis Wake and Moomba, Wake and Water ski Boats.

In just 4 short years, Marine Products has become one of the top Supra Moomba boat dealers in the county. Customer service, inventory selection, honesty, and our Knowledgeable Sales Staff has made us the top water sport pro shop in the states.

Their average employee has been with us over 15 years. Combined sales staff experience is over 100 years.
They never know what competitors might do “price wise,” but they say they always want your business, so never let a price scare you away. If you see an advertised price for less they will match that price with the best service available (price must be verifiable on like merchandise).

For more information, go to: http://www.marine-products.com/.


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Outdoors – Good crappie fishing on canal

The canal adjoins the road. The elevated road created a windbreak, keeping wind from interfering with the fishing of Larry Williams, who had launched a 14-foot johnboat.

“The crappie fishing has been good,” said Williams, 65, a retired electrician and mason from Hallsboro. “I caught my first big mess the first week of January.”

To Williams, a “mess” of crappie is anywhere from a half-dozen to 15 fish, his personal record. He said canal crappie run unusually large.

“Most crappie are 10 inches to 14 inches long,” he said. “It doesn’t take many that size to make a meal.”

Using a dip net, he corralled a sand minnow in a bucket. Hooking it through the lips, he dropped it into the water. A chartreuse float plopped above it, dangling from a few feet of line at the end of a telescoping fiberglass pole.

“The sand minnows were seined from the lake,” he said. “Native minnows work better than shiners you buy at a tackle shop and they’re less expensive.”

Although his boat had a trolling motor, Williams propelled the boat with a paddle made from a plank. He said the sound of an electric trolling motor scared the fish.

“A lot more fish are going to be biting at the end of February, when the roosters (male crappie) move to the edges,” he said. “After they spawn, the roosters and hens (female crappie) go back to deep water. When you find them along the bank, it’s on. You can catch a dozen in a morning of fishing.”

Williams paddled his boat along, trolling his minnow or lifting the shiny baitfish and brightly colored float out of the water, then dropping it back down at a spot that looked “fishy.” He fished the minnow beside felled trees that were now partially submerged, underneath overhanging waxmyrtle and sweetgum limbs, beside cypress trunks and under piers extending over the canal.

“There are some big alligators in the canals, but they don’t usually come out this time of year,” he said. “You see them after it warms up, but the crappie have usually stopped biting by then.”

Sharing a narrow canal with a big alligator while seated in a tiny boat keeps many anglers away from the canals in the summertime. But in wintertime, the canals are domains of fishermen like Williamson.

Williamson fished an hour before his first fish, and it turned out to be his only catch of the day. The float dove and the rod tip went up. The rod surged up and down as the angler tried to ease the soft-mouthed fish from the water. After a struggle that lasted several minutes, the hook pulled out of the fish’s mouth and it swam away.

“That was a big crappie, probably a 14-incher,” he said. “They really aren’t biting today. They pick their time to bite. You just have to be here when they do.”

Mike’s new book, “Fishing North Carolina,” details the fishing at 100 lakes, rivers, parks, sounds, beaches and piers. To order online or for more outdoors information, visit www.mikemarshoutdoors.com.


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