Archive for » February 9th, 2012«

A boatload of boats at this show

It’s a credit to Joe O’Neal, manager of the 2012 New England Boat Show, that he doesn’t flinch when you bring up the old adage: “A boat is a hole in the water that you pour your money into.”

“I think some people still think that,” says the Charlestown resident and owner of a 34-foot Saber power boat, speaking on the phone from his Quincy office. “That was really true for people who owned older boats that you constantly had to fix and update. But today’s boats are so reliable that there are very few mechanical issues.”

If fact, when people attend this year’s boat show, sponsored by Progressive Insurance and running Feb. 11-19 at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center, first-time visitors might be struck by a surprising little phenomenon: affordability.

Sure, at the show, the top boat (fit for Thurston Howell III and Lovey, no doubt) will top out at about $1 million, but O’Neal says visitors will also find 8-foot sailboats starting at about $3,000, and aluminum skiffs for around $4,000. And the financial blow can be further blunted by financing programs that allow buyers to walk away with a boat, motor and trailer for as little as $150 a month.

Those numbers sound good, especially in this economy. Asked if boats are a tough sell these days, O’Neal says, “Clearly the economy has impacted boat sales, but the core group of boaters has continued to boat and purchase boats. And [the boat market] has been coming back recently. It’s a slow process, but we’re seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.”

Maybe that’s why this year’s boat show has grown by 100,000 square feet — a 40 percent boost in exhibit space that makes room for more than 700 boats of all shapes and sizes, including wave-runners.

But the growth of this show also has lots to do with the region. New Englanders love to hit the water.

“Boating in New England is extremely popular,” says O’Neal. “There’s all that coastline from Rhode Island to the tip of Maine. And then you have all the interior lakes. The popularity of this show is just a reflection of the popularity of boating.”

The event is also increasingly family-friendly.

“It used to be that the boats were enough to draw in the crowd,” says O’Neal, describing the boat show business. “But that’s changed. That’s not enough anymore. People are looking for more entertainment.”

And he thinks they’ll find it at this boat show, where a 20-foot indoor pool provides the opportunity for people to compete in a remote-controlled powerboat docking challenge and a remote-controlled sailing contest. Teenage sailing adventurer Abby Sunderland will also be on hand to talk about her harrowing attempt to be, at the age of 16, the youngest person ever to circumnavigate the globe.

When you hear how that story ended, you might want to look into the cost of insuring your boat. But O’Neal says buyers will be surprised by the low price: often about $150 year.

O’Neal knows that many of the people who visit the exhibit will be diehards, old-timers, salty veterans, perhaps looking for a new boat, or just out to get a GPS or a new sail. But he’s really excited about the prospect of attracting new faces.

“Surveys show that at every show, we get new people,” he says. “Those are the people we want. We want new boat people.”

 

 

2012 New England Boat Show

WHEN: Feb. 11-19

WHERE: Boston Convention Exhibition Center

ADMISSION: $14 adults (16 and older); kids free

INFO: newenglandboatshow.com

 

Boat Show tips

Haggle: It’s like buying a new car. “All dealers negotiate,” says Joe O’Neal, manager of the 2012 New England Boat Show. “And be aware that many manufacturers have incentives that are good only during the show.”

Mull: Gather up information on the cost of everything, and go home and think about it. Then return – that’s why the exhibit runs for nine days.

Browse: “Take the time to walk through the show and see everything,” says O’Neal. “You might think you want one type of boat, but maybe you’ll realize that it doesn’t fit your lifestyle.”

Take a spin: “Some people want to take a test drive,” says O’Neal. “It’s possible a manufacturer will give you a sea trial, right after the show.”

 


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Central Pacific hot; winds hamper boats in north

Fishing is still very good in Quepos on the Central Pacific, but other areas turned on this week as well. Boats out of Los Sueños are getting into lots of sailfish and also some marlin. Many boats are reporting numbers in the double digits. The fish are hanging around 40 miles off the coast, but those willing to venture out are well rewarded.

The Papagayo winds are hampering boats up north in Guanacaste. A few marlin are being taken on good days, but the ocean is not the most pleasant this time of year. Inshore action also slowed in the region, but should pick up again after the moon.

Speaking of the moon, I have been chastised before for mentioning it in connection with billfishing and was told the moon has no effect on the fish. I don’t really agree, having seen the fish shut down on a full moon, and also bite like crazy on the full moon. The Southern Zone has been really slow the last two weeks, but apparently a new group of fish has moved into the area. Two days before the moon the bite was on, and my blood pressure dropped 20 points the same day.

The saving grace the last two weeks down south has been the inshore fishing. Lots of snapper, roosters and jacks have been hitting live bait and poppers.

The fishing over on the Caribbean continues to be good. Diann Sánchez checked in with the following report: “Tarpon fishing in Barra del Colorado continues to be good and steady. Last week brothers John and Don McCarthy visited Rio Colorado Lodge and fished three and a half days. They had one day that was really slow, but then things picked up, and they jumped 19 tarpon, two jacks, one barracuda and one snook. Next week we expect a nice crowd of people and are looking forward to some real good fishing. The weather continues to be mostly nice, with a shower or two intermittently to cool things down.”

Todd Staley is the fishing manager at Crocodile Bay Resort in Puerto Jiménez, on southwestern Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula. Skippers, operators and anglers are invited to email fishing reports by Wednesday of each week to todd@crocodilebay.com. To post reports and photos on The Tico Times’ online fishing forum, go to www.ticotimes.net/Weekend/Fishing and click on Show Us Your Catch.


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Search ISAF

The first modern Olympic Games took place in 1896 in its ancient birthplace, Athens, Greece. Sailing was planned for the programme but owing to bad weather the events were not staged.

Fast forward four years to 1900 and sailing’s 112 year Olympic history began on the River Seine. Meulan, 20km away from Paris, and Le Havre, located at the mouth of the Seine welcomed the sailors to the Games of the II Olympiad.

The regatta was split in two, the smaller boats sailied from 20 – 27 May whilst the 10-20 Ton boats sailed from 1-5 August.

All competitors were required to participate in a Concourse d’Honneur on 20 May at Meuan but only seven finished inside the time limit. Two, Mamie and Carabinier were disqualified for “using other means of propulsion than sail.”

The image below (taken from the 1900 Olympic Report) shows the boats that finished the Concourse d’Honneur.

The classes were determined under the Thames Tonnage Rules with the 10-20 and Over 20 Ton classes competing on the coast. In fact the big boats just had one race to determine their medal while the smaller classes on the Seine at Meulan had two separate races with medal winners in each.

This is one reason for the inconsistent results because some sources have aggregated the two races in the modern style as an overall series score.

Keeping It In The Family

Count Hermann de Pourtales of Switzerland, winner in the 1-2 Ton class, was the oldest sailor at 53. Sailing alongside him was his wife, Helene de Pourtales who, at 33, was the oldest woman in any of the 1900 Olympic sports. Helene became the first female Olympic medallist when Lerina (pictured right) crossed the line in a corrected time of 2 hours, 15 minutes and 32 seconds in Race 1 of the 1-2 Ton Class.

The wife and husband sailing duo were also joined by their nephew Bernard and they added a silver medal to their collection in Race 2 after they finished behind the German boat Aschenbradel.

They said

“In common with other sports at the 1900 Games the yachting results are varied, incomplete and contradictory,” concluded Ian Buchanan, president of the International Association of Olympic Historians who, with Swede Tore Widlund, ploughed through contemporary accounts in French, German and British periodicals.

“The picture that was in front is really impressive, the many amateur photographers who furnish the bank hasten to take pictures and while the public is in love with this panorama that we will not see for long in Meulan,” 1900 Olympic Report.

The Medallists

The 10-20 and Over 20 Ton classes had just one race to determine their medal whilst those racing on Seine had two, with medals (pictured right) determined in each. This is one reason for the inconsistent results because some sources have aggregated the two races in the modern style as an overall series score. For the full results table check out the Paris 1900 Olympic section on the brand new ISAF London 2012 Olympic Sailing website.

The Future

St. Louis, USA was to host the 1904 Olympic Games, beating off Chicago with 14 of 21 IOC votes. But unfortunately, this was the second games where sailing was not present, but it was to be the last with sailing present in every games to date.

ISAF London 2012 Olympic Sailing Website


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Detroit Becomes the "Boater City" as the 54th Annual Detroit Boat Show Rolls …

/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The Detroit Boat Show starts Saturday, Feb. 11 and runs through Feb. 19 at Cobo Center.  This week, hundreds of boats from 10 – 45 feet in length are lining up along the streets of Detroit waiting for their turn to get into the warm halls of Cobo which will be transformed into a summer paradise within a few days. 

Show management and exhibiting dealers are expecting a strong showing of attendees and boat buyers.  The show’s bulk exhibit space is sold out and up 24% from 2011.  More boats and more brands will be on display and for sale.  Many boat dealers attribute up to 50% of their annual sales due to the sales and leads generated at the Detroit Boat Show.

“With positive reports coming from Michigan’s auto industry and from other boat shows around the country, we are expecting a strong show here in Detroit,” said Show Manager John Ropp.  “Consumer confidence is up and so is pent-up demand – which means boat sales are heading in the right direction.”

Michigan has nearly 1 million registered boats on file and more than 4 million active boaters who enjoy them.  The Detroit Boat Show is one of the top five boat shows in the country.  “Detroit is really as much the ‘Boater City’ as it is the ‘Motor City’ if you look at the passion we have here for the water and boating related activities like fishing, cruising and waterskiing,” said Ropp.

Features and promotions and discount tickets are available at DetroitBoatShow.net. Regular admission is $12 for adults, children 12 and under free with an adult. Hours: Saturdays and Friday: 11 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Sundays: 11 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Monday through Thursday: 3 p.m. – 9 p.m. Parking is available at Cobo and surrounding lots. The Detroit Boat Show is owned and produced by the Michigan Boating Industries Association (MBIA), the voice of boating in Michigan. Revenue generated for this event is returned back to fund boater’s interests via MBIA’s programs and services. For more information visit www.DetroitBoatShow.net or call 800.932.2628.

The Detroit Boat Show is sponsored by RAM Trucks, Official Truck of the Detroit Boat Show, Courtyard by Marriott and Fishbone’s Restaurant.

SOURCE Michigan Boating Industries Association


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Open water fishing gives ice anglers an outlet

Life’s a Beat

This blog, like the people and things that make Metro Detroit an interesting place to live, is a diverse place of posts that are meant to be informative but also entertaining, engaging and inspiring.


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A little ‘ruff' sailing at boat show

BoE to pump £50 bln into economy

The Bank of England will inject another £50 billion into Britain’s weak economy and keep interest rates at a record-low …


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Anticipation runs high for 2012 Biloxi Boat and RV Show

The show, using a total of 140,000 square feet of space at the convention center and the adjacent parking lot, will feature 75 vendors, including ATV, personal watercraft, kayaks and campers.

“We have never had greater participation than we have had this year,” said Dan Miller of Gulf Coast Shows out of Mobile. “We have more dealers on hand than ever before and the optimism is high throughout the industry, both boating and RV. With manufacturers on hand, you will get some of the best prices of the year.

“It looks like sales have been good at other shows and the dealers are excited about the potential for this year. It’s going to be a great show.”

Miller said past shows generally draw crowds of 15,000 over the three days,

“It seems like people are in the mood to get out of the house. If not buy, at least dream about it,” Miller said.

The show will also include accessories such as marine audio, electronics, boat towers, boat lifts, fishing tackle and fishing guides. Special events will include seminars on salt and freshwater fishing and engine maintenance.


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Bad weather slows, but doesn’t stop crab fishery

The boats that braved the brutal weather to fish the bairdi tanner crab season in Kodiak, Chignik and the southern Alaska Peninsula are mostly done, in spite of a 10-day weather hold at the start of the season for the Chignik fleet.

It is a rather mixed fishery, with some areas operating under an open entry system with a 58-foot vessel size limit and other areas requiring a limited entry permit, the same as with Alaska’s salmon fisheries, but open to vessels of any size.

There also were mixed guideline harvest levels compared to last season.

The Kodiak district had a GHL of 950,000 pounds, down from 1.49 million last season, and a 20-pot-per-boat limit.

The Chignik district GHL was 700,000 pounds, up from 600,000 pounds last season, and a 30-pot limit.

The Alaska Peninsula districts, eastern and western, had a combined GHL of 1.62 million pounds, down from 2.3 million pounds, and a 30-pot limit. The pot limit last season for this district was 75 pots per boat.

There were 65 boats that fished the limited entry Kodiak fishery, 28 boats registered for Chignik, and 57 boats for the Alaska Peninsula.

There is an overlap fishery in the Semidi Islands, which straddles the area between Kodiak and Chignik and does not have a set GHL. It can be fished by boats registered in either Chignik or Kodiak, according to Alaska Department of Fish and Game area management biologist Mark Stichert. That area was still open as of Feb. 3, with five boats registered.

Because of the lack of a set quota, it is hard to say when that area might close.

“We don’t do any surveying in that area, unlike Chignik and Kodiak and the (Alaska) Peninsula and other areas where we have quotas based on the survey data,” Stichert said.

“It’s designed as an exploratory fishery,” he elaborated. “We manage it in-season, we have a mandatory call-up program with the boats, where we talk to each boat every day, and we largely monitor (catch per unit of effort).”

The effort of what few boats fish the area may largely be driven by curiosity and a sense of adventure from pre-GPS days, when the only way to navigate through the Semidis was with what was known as the “white chart,” the paper chart issued by NOAA that had no depth soundings, only white areas surrounding the islands.

“The reality is a lot of people are intrigued by the Semidis, and the few people that have gone typically don’t find a lot of crab,” Stichert said. “Last year I think we had six or seven boats that did some exploring around, and had a total harvest of something less than 20,000 pounds.”

He also said that weather last year limited most of the smaller boats to exploring around the bays, and small catch rates led to closing the waters inside 3 miles after a couple of weeks.

This year they will continue to watch the CPUE to decide when to close the fishery.

About half of the Chignik district was also still open last week, with about 80,000 pounds out of 140,000 pounds for the area west of Castle Bay still available. It could be open for awhile, Stichert said.

“Nothing eminent there, I think a lot of guys are just exploring right now, and fishing in areas they haven’t fished in the past,” he said.

He also noted that there are a lot of smaller boats fishing those waters, and the harsh winter and open waters are slowing things down.

“There’s a lot of exposure in that part of Chignik area,” he added.

Dock prices for the crab this season has ranged between $2.50 and $3.00 per pound.

A bill that is making its way through the state Legislature that is designed to increase Alaskans’ participation in state fisheries is getting support from the Cordova District Fishermen United group.

According to the sponsor’s statement, House Bill 261 “seeks to increase Alaskan ownership of Alaskan fisheries by enabling a larger number of state residents to purchase limited entry commercial fishing permits.”

The bill doubles the amount of money available to Alaska residents for commercial fishing loans from $100,000 to $200,000, and would allow loans for entry permits at 2 percent below the prime rate with an interest floor of 3 percent.

The Cordova Times reports that Alexis Cooper, executive director of CDFU, praised the bill for “allow(ing) many young Alaskans a continued opportunity to obtain entrance into independent commercial fishing businesses by increasing finance opportunities unavailable to them from commercial lending institutions.”

The bill is co-sponsored by Reps. Bryce Edgmond, Charisse Millett and Steve Thompson, chair of the House Fisheries Committee.

Cooper noted in a letter to Thompson that since 2008 in Prince William Sound alone, the price of limited entry permits has increased more than 50 percent to values in excess of $100,000. According to the Commercial Fisheries Entry Commission, estimated average value of a Prince William Sound drift gillnet permit for 2011 is $161,600.

“In this same time the lending maximum of the Commercial Fishing Loan Program has remained static, limiting the number of state residents’ access to purchase limited entry permits,” Cooper told the Times.

Not everyone is a fan of the bill, though. It drew criticism from Commercial Fishing and Agriculture Bank President Lela Klingert, who voiced her concerns in a Jan. 25 letter to the House Finance Committee.

Klingert said that at first glance the intent of HB 261 seems commendable, to provide residents with below market interest rate loans in order to boost their prospects of entering the Alaska commercial fishing industry, while addressing the looming issue of a graying fleet, and without competing with private sector lenders.

However, she noted, the opposite generally occurs.

“These types of programs generally result in driving up demand, which then drives up price. While this maybe good for the seller of the permit, it is generally not good for the buyer,” she said.

Klingert said CFAB supports assisting residents in purchasing limited entry permits, but would encourage legislators to work toward preparing borrowers “to be able to operate on a level playing field so that they not only get into the fishery, but have the wherewithal and commitment to be competitive in it. Regretfully, we do not believe this change will do that,” she told the Times.

Cristy Fry has commercial fished out of Homer and King Cove since 1978. She can be reached at realist468@gmail.com.


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Boat sales industry reveals big downturn last year

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – The Vancouver International Boat Show is back, starting at the same time the industry reveals a big downturn in 2011.

A manufacturers’ group says sales of new and used recreational boats and outboard engines fell 21 per cent last year to $2.8 billion.

Local dealer Bob Pappajohn at MP Mercury Sales says his experience was different; he tells us his company saw a 15 per cent sales increase, with plenty of strength at the high end.

“Very much so,” he tells us. “In fact, at the higher end, we actually didn’t see a dip.
It continued very strong right through 2009, 2010 and 2011.”

But the National Marine Manufacturers Association says sales of new boats were down 22 per cent last year.

The boat show is at BC Place and the Granville Island marina through Sunday.

The boat show is at BC Place and the Granville Island marina.


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Good sturgeon fishing in Bonneville Pool, and excellent boat steelhead fishing in The Dalles Pool

The Columbia River fishing reports by Oregon Fish and Wildlife:

Weekend Fishing Opportunities:

Sturgeon angling is good for boat anglers in the Bonneville Pool (which closes for retention fishing on Feb. 18) when the weather cooperates. Anglers in the John Day Pool are also catching a few legals.

Steelhead fishing is excellent for boat anglers in The Dalles Pool. Steelhead should also be available for anglers plunking on the lower Columbia River sandbars.

SALMON, STEELHEAD AND SHAD

The following modifications are now in effect for the mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington border above McNary Dam:

COLUMBIA RIVER MAINSTEM, BUOY 10 LINE UPSTREAM TO THE I-5 BRIDGE:

This section of the Columbia River is currently open seven days per week to the retention of adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook, adipose fin-clipped steelhead, and adipose fin-clipped coho during January 1 through Wednesday February 29, 2012 with a daily bag limit of two adult salmon or steelhead in combination plus five jacks.

Effective Thursday March 1 through Friday April 6, 2012 (or until the catch guideline of 12,700 upriver spring Chinook has been reached) this section of the Columbia River will be open to the retention of adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook, adipose fin-clipped steelhead, and shad with a daily bag limit of two adult salmon, only one of which may be a Chinook (≥24″), and five adipose fin-clipped jacks; however, the season will be closed on Tuesdays, March 20, 27, and April 3 to allow for possible commercial fishing days. The retention of chum and sockeye salmon is prohibited. All other permanent rules apply.

COLUMBIA RIVER MAINSTEM, I-5 BRIDGE UPSTREAM TO BONNEVILLE DAM:

This section of the Columbia River is open to the retention of adipose fin-clipped steelhead with a daily bag limit of two fish during January 1 – February 29, 2012. The retention of spring Chinook is prohibited as per permanent regulations.

Effective Thursday March 1, the mainstem Columbia River from the I-5 Bridge upstream to Beacon Rock plus the Oregon and Washington banks from Beacon Rock upstream to Bonneville Dam will be open to the retention of adipose fin-clipped spring Chinook, adipose fin-clipped steelhead and shad through Friday April 6 (or until the catch guideline of 12,700 upriver spring Chinook has been reached); however, the season will be closed on Tuesdays, March 20, 27 and April 3 to allow for possible commercial fishing days. The daily bag limit will be two adipose fin-clipped adult salmonids, of which only one may be a Chinook (≥24″), plus five adipose fin-clipped Chinook jacks. The retention of chum and sockeye salmon is prohibited.

All other permanent rules remain in effect.

COLUMBIA RIVER MAINSTEM, BONNEVILLE DAM UPSTREAM TO THE OREGON/WASHINGTON BORDER:

This section of the Columbia River is open January 1 – March 15, 2012 to the retention of adipose fin-clipped steelhead with a daily bag limit of two fish. The retention of spring Chinook is prohibited as per permanent regulations.

Effective Friday March 16 through Wednesday May 2, 2012 (or until the catch guideline of 1,700 fish has been reached), this area will be open to the retention of adipose fin-clipped spring chinook and adipose fin-clipped steelhead with a daily bag limit of two adipose fin-clipped adult chinook (≥24″) or steelhead in combination, plus five adipose fin-clipped chinook jacks. Angling for salmon and steelhead from a floating device between Bonneville Dam and the Tower Island Powerlines (located approximately 6 miles downstream from The Dalles Dam) is prohibited.

Boat and bank anglers are catching steelhead in The Dalles Pool. Effort for steelhead and early spring Chinook was light this past weekend on the lower Columbia, with 34 boats and 37 Oregon bank anglers observed on Saturday’s flight (2/4).

Portland to Longview Bank:

No report.

Portland to Longview boats:

Weekend checking showed no catch for 19 boats (37 anglers).

Bonneville Pool:

No report.

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed eight adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept, plus 12 unclipped steelhead released for six boats (11 anglers); and four adipose fin-clipped steelhead kept plus two unclipped steelhead released for 23 bank anglers.

John Day Pool:

Weekly checking showed no catch for six bank anglers.

STURGEON

The following modifications are now in effect for the mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to the Oregon/Washington border above McNary Dam:

BUOY 10 UPSTREAM TO WAUNA POWERLINES:

This section of the Columbia River is currently open to the retention of sturgeon seven days per week with a daily bag limit of one sturgeon between 38 and 54 inches fork length and an annual limit of five fish. The retention of green sturgeon is prohibited.

The following modifications were adopted at the January 26 Compact/Joint State Hearing for the 2012 mainstem Columbia River sturgeon fishery from Wauna Powerlines (River Mile 40) downstream to the mouth at Buoy 10, including Youngs Bay and all adjacent Washington tributaries.

The modifications include:

Allow the retention of white sturgeon seven days per week effective Sunday January 1 through Monday April 30, 2012 with a daily bag limit of one fish between 38 – 54 inches fork length.

Prohibit the retention of sturgeon seven days per week during Tuesday May 1 through Friday May 11, 2012.

Allow the retention of sturgeon seven days per week effective Saturday May 12 through Sunday July 8, 2012 (or until the harvest guideline of 4,160 legal white sturgeon has been reached) with a daily bag limit of one fish between 41 – 54 inches fork length in effect.

Prohibit the retention of sturgeon seven days per week during Monday July 9through Monday December 31, 2012.

Retention of green sturgeon is prohibited as per permanent regulations.

Catch and release of sturgeon may continue during retention closures.

WAUNA POWERLINES UPSTREAM TO BONNEVILLE DAM:

Effective January 1 through Tuesday July 31, 2012, this section of the Columbia River is open to the retention of sturgeon on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays with a daily bag limit of one fish between 38 – 54 inches fork length and an annual limit of five fish.

The following modifications were adopted at the January 26 Compact/Joint State Hearing for the 2012 mainstem Columbia River sturgeon fishery from the Wauna Powerlines (River Mile 40) upstream to Bonneville Dam, all adjacent Washington tributaries, excluding the lower Willamette River upstream to Willamette Falls, Multnomah Channel, and Gilbert River.

The modifications include:

Allow the retention of white sturgeon three days per week on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, and prohibit the retention of sturgeon four days per week on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday beginning January 1 through Tuesday July 31, 2012.Prohibit the retention of sturgeon seven days per week during Wednesday August 1 through Friday October 19, 2012.

Allow the retention of sturgeon three days per week on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday and prohibit the retention of sturgeon four days per week on Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday beginning Saturday October 20 through December 31, 2012 or until the catch guideline of 2,080 legal white sturgeon has been met.

Effective Wednesday, February 1 through Monday, April 30 angling is prohibited for all species in the area from a line between the upstream end of Sand Island and a marker on the Oregon shoreline, downstream to a line between the lower end of Sand Island and a marker on the Oregon shoreline.

Retention of green sturgeon is prohibited as per permanent regulations.

Catch and release of sturgeon may continue during sturgeon retention closures, except all sturgeon angling is prohibited between Marker 82 and Bonneville Dam during May 1-August 31, 2012.

The lower Willamette remains closed for sturgeon retention except for February 17 – 18 and February 24 – 25.

BONNEVILLE DAM UPSTREAM TO THE OREGON/WASHINGTON BORDER:

Regulations for the 2012 sturgeon sport fishery from Bonneville Dam upstream to the Oregon/Washington border are currently as follows:

Sturgeon creel sampling summaries and catch estimates for Bonneville, The Dalles, and John Day pools can be found at the following link:

WDFW Mid-Columbia River mainstem sport sampling summary

BONNEVILLE DAM UPSTREAM TO THE DALLES DAM:

Effective January 1, 2012 this section of the Columbia River is open to the retention of sturgeon seven days per week until the catch guideline is reached. The daily bag limit is one sturgeon between 38-54 inches fork length and an annual limit of five fish. The use of more than one single point barbless hook is prohibited.

THE DALLES DAM UPSTREAM TO MCNARY DAM:

Effective January 1, 2012 this section of the Columbia River is open to the retention of sturgeon seven days per week until the catch guidelines are reached. The daily bag limit is one sturgeon between 43-54 inches fork length and an annual limit of five fish. The use of more than one single point barbless hook is prohibited.

MCNARY DAM UPSTREAM TO THE OREGON/WASHINGTON BORDER:

Effective Wednesday February 1 through Tuesday July 31, 2012 this section of the Columbia River is open to the retention of sturgeon seven days per week with a daily bag limit of one sturgeon between 43-54 inches fork length and an annual limit of five fish. The use of more than one single point barbless hook is prohibited.

Sturgeon angler effort is light on the lower Columbia, and catch rates remain poor overall. Sturgeon fishing is excellent in the Bonneville Pool when the weather cooperates. Anglers are also catching a few keepers in the John Day Pool.

Gorge Bank:

Weekly checking showed no catch for 13 anglers.

Gorge Boats:

No report.

Troutdale Bank:

No report.

Troutdale Boats:

No report.

Portland to Longview Bank:

Weekly checking showed two sublegal sturgeon released for four bank anglers.

Portland to Longview Boats:

Weekend checking showed one legal white sturgeon kept, plus 33 sublegal sturgeon released for 34 boats (81 anglers).

Bonneville Pool:

Weekly checking showed four sublegal sturgeon released for 56 bank anglers; and seven legal white sturgeon kept, plus 171 sublegal sturgeon released for 39 boats (97 anglers).

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed three sublegal sturgeon released for 41 bank anglers; and four sublegal sturgeon released for seven boats (19 anglers).

John Day Pool:

Weekly checking showed no catch for 17 bank anglers; and three legal sturgeon kept plus three sublegal and one oversize sturgeon released for 17 boats (35 anglers).

WALLEYE

Bonneville Pool:

Weekly checking showed nine walleye kept for two boats (two anglers).

The Dalles Pool:

Weekly checking showed four walleye kept and one walleye released for five boats (15 anglers).

John Day Pool:

Weekly checking showed nine walleye kept for eight boats (16 anglers).


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