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Hagadone Marine to host own boat show in 2012

December 28, 2011
Filed under News

COEUR D’ALENE, Idaho – Hagadone Marine Group in Coeur d’Alene will be hosting its own boat show in 2012, foregoing the Spokane International Show to invite customers to come to the boat show and sales event scheduled Jan. 21 through Feb. 5. at Hagadone’s Blackwell Island showroom.

“This new location will give us the opportunity to present our entire stock of 2012 Cobalt, Carver, Malibu, Axis and Regal Boats as well as our full line of pre-owned boats,” Craig Brosenne, general manager of the Hagadone Marine Group, said in a release.

Hagadone is skipping the boat show and inviting customers to come test out the boats on the water at Hagadone’s Blackwell Island Marine on Lake Coeur d’Alene. The boat show idea will allow boat buyers an on-water demonstration before they finalize their purchase, Hagadone said. “When was the last time you purchased a car without driving it first?” Brosenne said in the release.

“We still believe boat shows are important and get people excited about boating,” Brosenne said. “By staging a free event at our 25,000-square-foot indoor facility, we provide the buyer with the best selection of models to select from at one location.”

The boat show and sales event will last for more than two weeks and will feature more than 100 boats and slips for sale from Hagadone Marine Group’s three marinas. “Boat slips at our three marines, which are constantly in short supply, will be available with the purchase of select boats,” Hagadone director of sales Paul Nielsen said.

“Having everything in one location on the water will give our customers the opportunity to view and test drive every new and pre-owned boat we have,” Nielsen added. “We’re the largest boating facility in the Pacific Northwest and this will be a unique opportunity for people to enjoy tremendous value and the finest family boating.”

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Gentlemen look away: Angler snares deadly fish that killed two men by biting off their testicles

  • Angler wrestled 40lb monster on to
    the floor of his boat and opened its snapping jaws with his naked hands
  • Pacu fish boasts impressive set of man-like molars, which tear off testicles of unwitting fishermen

By
Nadia Gilani

Last updated at 8:37 PM on 28th December 2011

An intrepid British angler today told how he snared a predator which kills men – by biting off their testicles.

Fearless Jeremy Wade, 53, spent weeks hunting for the fish in remote Papua New Guinea after locals reported a mysterious beast which was castrating young fishermen.

He finally unmasked the perpetrator as the Pacu fish – known locally as ‘The Ball Cutter’ – and managed to catch one in his small wooden fishing boat.

Brave: Jeremy Wade, pictured with the ferocious 'Ball Cutter' fish which has killed two men by biting off their testicles

Brave: Jeremy Wade, pictured with the ferocious ‘Ball Cutter’ fish which has killed two men by biting off their testicles

Mr Wade wrestled the 40lb monster on to the floor of his boat and opened its snapping jaws with his naked hands – to discover a jaw-dropping array of human-style teeth.

The Ball Cutter boasts an impressive set of man-like molars, which tear off the testicles of unwitting hunters, leaving them to bleed to death.

Mr Wade, from Bath, Somerset, told how he reeled in the Ball Cutter as part of his new series of River Monsters, aired on ITV next week.

He said: ‘I had heard of a couple of fishermen in Papua New Guinea who had been castrated by something in the water.

‘The bleeding was so severe that they died. The locals told me that this thing was like a human in the water, biting at the testicles of fishermen. They didn’t know what it was.

‘It is a hot and dirty area so the
people would often go to the water with their children to wash but
obviously they were very worried about this thing in the water.

‘Amazingly,
these things are quite elusive so we had to be patient catching one. We
put a line into the water and waited for it to bite.

‘When
I reeled it in, it had this mouth which was surprisingly human-like, it
is almost like they have teeth specially made for crushing.

‘They
are like human molars and the fish have powerful jaw muscles. They are
very deep bodied and solid like a carp, with strong muscles.’

At
least two fishermen have bled to death after being bitten by the beast
although Jeremy believes they were ‘pretty unlucky’ as it is quite shy.

Fierce: The pacu fish have human-like teeth and powerful jaw muscles

Fierce: The pacu fish have human-like teeth and powerful jaw muscles

Pacu fish are usually found in the Amazon, where they need their teeth to crack into the tough cases of nuts and seeds.

The previously vegetarian fish were introduced to Papua New Guinea 15 years ago to increase stocks.

They quickly used their special technique to chomp meat due to a lack of suitable vegetation in the waters – making short work of human testicles.

Former biology teacher Jeremy luckily just sustained a small nick to his knuckles during his encounter with the Ball Cutter, despite wearing just shorts and a T-shirt.

The angler of 40 years said: ‘It is about going in to these situations with the right information to know what you are dealing with.

‘It is all about prevention. But there is this fear running through you. As long as I know what I am about to face and we have all of the precautions then I am happy.

‘The fish was remarkably muscular, it was kicking so hard to get away from me but I wasn’t really injured.’

Jeremy spent 14 weeks travelling around the world – from Australia to Suriname in South America – to film his third series of his hit show this year.

He captured a total of seven beasts, including an electric eel which stopped human hearts in Brazil, before releasing them back into the wild.

His team consisted of just four others, plus a local guide who would show them where to find the monsters. 

River Monsters Series Three – which features seven parts – will begin on ITV1 at 7.30 on January 3. The fourth series is currently in production.

Here’s what other readers have said. Why not add your thoughts,
or debate this issue live on our message boards.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Heck, That sure took some ‘B+ll’s. !

That fish has a lot of balls….

OUCH! *ROFL*

My god, this hurt to read.

I never gave the writes to sell pictures of my X Mother In Law !

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Sailing friends plotting course for Olympics

Stuart Bithell and Luke Patience, Britain’s in-form 470 sailing pairing and World Championship silver medalists, often reflect on the moment they heard the 2012 Olympics would be held in London.

“I was up at Luke’s house in Scotland. We were teenagers, and he was a good buddy of mine, but we had never sailed together as a partnership,” said Bithell, 25.

“I switched on the TV news as the announcement was being made. I think we both decided from that moment we would aim for the Olympics.

“Now we’ve got a good chance of being there – and together – we talk quite regularly about the irony of being together when we heard.”

Bithell, from Rochdale, teamed up with Patience four-years later, and the pair have exceeded even the most optimistic expectations during their relatively short time together. At the 2009 World Championships – after being in the boat together for just two-weeks – they won a silver medal.

A string of podium finishes have saw them climb to fourth in the 470 world rankings by the end of 2010. A silver medal at the Sailing World Championships in Perth earlier this month confirmed them as front runners to represent Great Britain in the 470 at next year’s Olympics.

“Our performance in Perth will have been really good for our chances of selection but it is not the be all and end all,” said Bithell.

“You assume the selection process will be result-based, which puts us at the top of the pack, but there may be other factors.

“We predicted that the big events like the World Championships in Perth will be the most important, but you don’t always know.

“We work on the basis that the selectors are always watching. It’s probably a good thing because it keeps us on our toes.”

Bithell is sensible to approach the selection process with trepidation. Nick Rogers, a silver medalist at Athens and Beijing, and Chris Grube are a formidable British 470 partnership. While Nic Asher and Elliot Willis, the outsiders for Olympic selection, are also doing well at the moment.

“Nick and Chris are good friends of ours and we dine together at events, but Nic and Elliot prefer to do their own thing,” said Bithell.

“It’s a bit frustrating not knowing for certain whether we will be going to London, but we treated Perth as an Olympic trials. We focused all out effort and energy on performing there, which we did. Now we are preparing as though we will definitely be at the Olympics. All our focus is on hitting our peak for the Olympic sailing events next year.”

Bithell was introduced to sailing as a seven-year-old on Hollingworth lake, Rochdale, and quickly adapted to life on the water with his father’s crew.

“When I first began sailing everything was centred around having fun,” said Bithell.

“Hollingworth lake was a very nice, pleasant place to start out and whenever I can go back I do. My parents still live round there and I go out on the lake with my dad. He’s not an Olympic athlete but he’s not bad. He’s a big sailing fan and I’m sure he’s very proud of what I’m doing.”

Bithell began sailing full time at 18-years-old as part of the Team GB development scheme.

“We weren’t actually getting paid, we were just getting coaching support and expenses,” said Bithell.

“After I teamed up with Luke and we came second in the World Championships, I started to realise that we were a good solid team and had a shot at getting to the Olympics. Few teams are as good friends with each other as me and Luke and I think that’s absolutely a positive. We started racing against each other when we were 15 and became good friends because we were the same age and had a lot in common.

“We went head-to-head quite a few times when we were younger so we know each other competitively as well. We just connected and my strength’s really complement Luke’s.

“We do gym work together and spend a lot of time together off the water, more than most would advise probably.

“But we very rarely argue on the water, whereas we see other teams – usually the Italians – arguing a lot.”

Bithell relocated from Rochdale to Portland – where next year’s Olympic sailing events will be held four-years-ago.

“I’m quite familiar with the waters around Portland and Weymouth.

“If no competitor from the other countries had been allowed to practice there it would be a huge advantage, but the London Olympic Organising Committee have allowed other countries to train there. At the Beijing Olympics nobody was allowed to go out on the waters before the competition started.”

  • The 470 is a doublehanded dinghy with one hull and a centreboard. The name 470 refers to the 4.7m length of the boat. It is relatively easy to handle and is often used by sailing schools to introduce people to high-performance boats.

    The 470 has been an Olympic Class since 1976, when men and women competed against each other.

    At the 1988 Seoul Olympics separate events were established for men and women and it has been the same ever since.

    Mat Belcher and Malcolm Page, the Australian duo are favourite to win the men’s event at London 2012.



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    Florida boat auction set for January

    Florida boat auction set for January


    Posted on 28 December 2011


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    The Indian River Nautical Flea Market and Seafood Festival will host a boat, watercraft and vehicle auction in January.

    The event will be held Jan. 21-22 at the Indian River Fairgrounds in Vero Beach.

    Boat repossessions, short sales, dealer trades and private liquidations will be for sale. A preview will be held all day on Jan. 21; the sale starts at 11 a.m. the following day.

    As many as 10,000 boat enthusiasts have attended past editions of the event. To pre-register to sell or buy a boat, click here or call (561) 844-0440.

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    Russian boat Sparta in Antarctic sails for open water

    The Sparta in Antarctic ice, on 17 December 2011The Sparta is expected to reach the New Zealand port of Lyttelton

    A Russian fishing boat is now making its way to open water after being stuck in ice-filled waters off Antarctica for 12 days with a hole in its hull.

    New Zealand officials said that the Sparta began navigating 160km (100 miles) of sea ice after repairs were finished on Wednesday.

    A South Korean icebreaker ship, the Araon, reached the Sparta on 26 December to offer assistance.

    Both ships are expected to clear the ice pack later on Wednesday.

    The Sparta will then head to the New Zealand port of Lyttelton where permanent repairs will be done, said rescue centre spokesman Chris Henshaw.

    According to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ), repair work carried out on the Sparta included transferring fuel and welding plating onto the ship to make it seaworthy.

    “The inside of the (hull hole) has been all fixed up,” Mr Henshaw told New Zealand radio.

    Other vessels attempted to rescue the Sparta – which hit an iceberg and issued a distress call on 16 December – but heavy ice prevented them from doing so.

    A Hercules aircraft was previously flown over the site but officials said the plane could not pick up the crew.

    While waiting for help, the crew threw cargo overboard to lighten the ship and raise the hole in the hull above the water line.

    The Sparta has a crew of 15 Russians, 16 Indonesians and one Ukrainian.


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    Sailing-Protest lodged on Sydney-Hobart winner

    Australian supermaxi
    Investec Loyal’s thrilling Sydney-Hobart win is under threat
    after a protest was lodged minutes after the race, claiming its
    crew asked a media helicopter pilot to spy on rival supermaxi
    Wild Oats XI during the 680 nautical mile race.

    An international yacht racing committee will hear the
    protest on Thursday, meanwhile Investec Loyal has been declared
    provisional winner, crossing the line only minutes ahead of Wild
    Oats XI on Wednesday.

    The protest says that an Investec Loyal crew member asked a
    media helicopter pilot whether Wild Oats XI was using a tri-sail
    as the two boats sailed down the Australian east coast off the
    fishing town of Merimbula on day one of the race.

    Under yacht racing rules such a request could be viewed as
    outside assistance.


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    2012 Legacy Fly Fishing Drift Boat

    PRLog (Press Release)Dec 27, 2011
    Pavati Marine, White City, Oregon unveils their all new 2012 Legacy Drift Boat designed specifically for the expert fly fisherman.  The boat includes a front and rear door, a snag free line deck, built in fly rod storage tubes, front and rear casting stands, and their patented quick- lock floor system. The quick lock floor system is a simple but quick feature that allows you to arrange the boat any way you like, making the possibilities endless. These distinctive looking boats not only look nice but are built with the quality demanded by the most experienced fisherman.  Easy rowing and more than enough room to fish from this boat is what dreams are made of!  For more information visit www.pavatimarine.com

    PAVATI Marine understands that not everyone fishes the same way and we want your drift boat to compliment your fishing style. We have three models of drift boats (above), “The Legacy”, “The Warrior”, and “The Guardian”, covering all aspects of the drift boat fishing world. Although each boat is still designed with our patented modular seat system for the maximum flexibility possible for any drift boat, there are subtle differences. If you are a fly fisherman, the Legacy has fly rod tubes, molded casting stands, and a snag free line deck.

    If you are a bait and tackle guy, the “Guardian” is setup with built in weight tray on the line deck, a heated oven option and a more “weight forward” design for fishing two or three up front. The “Warrior” Drift boat is for the serious white water drifters who need the dryest, easiest maneuvering boat available. Look at each model and see which drift boat serves your needs best.

    Click on each boat above to find out more! If you have any questions, please call a factory representative at 800.866.5269 and we will get you taken care of.


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    Sailing-Investec Loyal wins Sydney-Hobart

    Australian supermaxi
    Investec Loyal won the 67th Sydney-Hobart on Wednesday, crossing
    the line just minutes ahead of Wild Oats XI after the two boats
    engaged in a tacking duel ahead of the finish line.

    In the closest finish in 28 years, Investec Loyal gained the
    lead from rival supermaxi Wild Oats XI early on Wednesday after
    trailing the favourite since the start of the 680 nautical mile
    race on Monday.

    Investec Loyal, crewed mainly by amateur sailors, opted to
    sail further out to sea than Wild Oats XI, a six-times line
    honours winner, and picked up better winds in the final stages.

    Investec Loyal crossed the line two minutes, 10 seconds
    ahead of Wild Oats XI.


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    Foster City Waterfront Holiday Lights Contest winners announced


    Eight judges traveled the Foster City waterways on Dec. 11 to choose the winners for for the event.

    Eight judges in an ElectraCraft boat traveled the waterways to pay homage to those residents who lit up their homes with beautiful holiday light displays along Foster Citys magical waterways, said a statement by Patti Styka of ElectraCraft Boat Sales.

    After a lively and spirited debate, the following residents were acknowledged in their respective categories:

    Best overall
    John and Fern Quigley, San Nicholas Lane

    Most eco-friendly
    Tom and Dianna Halpin, Sailfish Isle

    Best condo, townhome or apartment
    Jane Warren and Raj Tiwari Sumita Bhattacharya, Lido Lane

    Most imaginative
    Dr. and Mrs. Leland R. Smith David R. Smith

    Best neighborhood display
    Bo Hintz Nancy Rancatore Hintz, Phil Chris Lerza, Dan Dianne Damico, Flying Mist Isle

    The sponsors of the event, Patti Styka-ElectraCraft Boat Sales, and the Foster City Parks and Recreation Department, offer their congratulations to the winners and thank all of the participants for their hard work and enthusiasm! said the statement.


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    Patched up Russian fishing boat poised to leave Antarctic

    Chris Henshaw, of the Rescue Co-ordination Centre said the 48-metre Sparta, with 32 crew on board, had been patched up with the aid of the of the Korean icebreaker Araon, which reached the stricken vessel Monday, after two other boats attempting mercy missions were forced to turn back due to thick pack ice.

    He said the Sparta would be escorted by the Araon out of the Ross Sea, where the Russian vessel had reported on December 16 that it was sinking, about 3,700 kilometres south-east of New Zealand.

    ‘They’ve got approximately 100 miles (160 kilometres) of ice to get through, and once she’s clear of the ice the intention is, we understand, that Sparta will then make her way to Lyttelton (New Zealand).’

    At the South Island port near Christchurch, the Sparta is expected to have permanent repairs to the 30-centimetre gash punched into the hull by the iceberg.

    Henshaw said that the two ships would take about 12 hours to get beyond the ice, when it is expected to rendezvous with its sister ship Chiyo Maru Number 3.

    The Sparta was patched up after the repair mission struck a hitch and discovered a second puncture on Tuesday.

    The Rescue Co-ordination Centre said plans to attach a steel plate to the outside of the hull, after fuel was pumped off to raise the ship and expose the hole above the waterline, were abandoned for unspecified safety reasons, but a cement box was being secured to the inside of the shell plating to make the vessel seaworthy.

    When the ship’s bow was raised above the water level, a second hole was discovered, but that caused only localized flooding in a small contained space and would not stop it sailing.

    ‘;
    PrintArticle();//–

    Wellington – A Russian fishing boat stuck in the Antarctic for 12 days after being holed by an iceberg was due Wednesday to steam out of the area of the mishap, after temporary repairs to its hull, a New Zealand rescue official said.

    Chris Henshaw, of the Rescue Co-ordination Centre said the 48-metre Sparta, with 32 crew on board, had been patched up with the aid of the of the Korean icebreaker Araon, which reached the stricken vessel Monday, after two other boats attempting mercy missions were forced to turn back due to thick pack ice.

    He said the Sparta would be escorted by the Araon out of the Ross Sea, where the Russian vessel had reported on December 16 that it was sinking, about 3,700 kilometres south-east of New Zealand.

    ‘They’ve got approximately 100 miles (160 kilometres) of ice to get through, and once she’s clear of the ice the intention is, we understand, that Sparta will then make her way to Lyttelton (New Zealand).’

    At the South Island port near Christchurch, the Sparta is expected to have permanent repairs to the 30-centimetre gash punched into the hull by the iceberg.

    Henshaw said that the two ships would take about 12 hours to get beyond the ice, when it is expected to rendezvous with its sister ship Chiyo Maru Number 3.

    The Sparta was patched up after the repair mission struck a hitch and discovered a second puncture on Tuesday.

    The Rescue Co-ordination Centre said plans to attach a steel plate to the outside of the hull, after fuel was pumped off to raise the ship and expose the hole above the waterline, were abandoned for unspecified safety reasons, but a cement box was being secured to the inside of the shell plating to make the vessel seaworthy.

    When the ship’s bow was raised above the water level, a second hole was discovered, but that caused only localized flooding in a small contained space and would not stop it sailing.


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